Student Writing Competition

The National LGBT Bar Association’s Michael Greenberg Student Writing Competition recognizes and encourages outstanding law student scholarship on the legal issues affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex persons (Click here to download flyer).

TOPIC: Legal issues affecting the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and/or Intersex community.

AWARDS:

First Place

·         $1,000 cash prize

·         Publication in the Journal of Law and Sexuality at Tulane University Law School

·         Registration, airfare & lodging for the 2010 Lavender Law Conference and Career Fair (August 26-28th in Miami Beach, Florida)*

First & Second Runners-up

·         Registration for the 2010 Lavender Law Conference and Career Fair (August 26-28th in Miami Beach, Florida)

FORMAT: Entries should be a scholarly piece fit for publication in a law review. Entries should follow standard Note format, including Bluebook (18th edition) citation form.  All entries must be submitted in English. Each entry should be no longer than 25 single-sided pages with one-inch margins and 12-point Times New Roman font, double-spaced.  The page limit includes footnotes (Note: footnotes should be single-spaced and 10-point). Entries containing endnotes or including appendices or supplemental material will not be considered. Published papers or papers to be published in other publications during the entirety of the competition process are ineligible. Each individual may submit only one entry and group entries will not be accepted.  Entries should be the sole work of the author and should not yet have undergone editing by others. Editing includes any significant revision as well as technical or substantive review of citations. Informal support, such as general comments on preliminary drafts, is permitted.

All entries must be submitted electronically in either Word or PDF format.  Entrants should not include their name or the name of their school on the competition paper itself. Instead, participants should submit a cover page indicating their name, school, permanent address, telephone number and email address.

DEADLINE: Entries should be submitted before the competition closing date of June 1, 2010.  Entries are submitted via email to writingcompetition@lgbtbar.org. Please include “Michael E. Greenberg Writing Competition” in the subject line.

QUESTIONS?

Please contact the LGBT Bar’s Law Student Division co-chair Samuel Pearson-Moore at writingcompetition@lgbtbar.orgPlease do not include any substantive information regarding your piece, as submissions are blind-graded by student co-chairs.

*Airfare will be provided only from destinations within the 48 contiguous United States.

For more information, please visit: lgbtbar.org/competition.html.

If you are interested in learning more about the exciting work of the National LGBT Bar Association’s Law Student Division and being involved in the Law Student Congress please contact Samuel Pearson-Moore at sm1503a@american.edu.

2010 Lone Star Classic in Texas

The 2010 Lone Star Classic will be held on October 14th, 15th, and 16th in San Antonio, Texas. The competition is open to all ABA accredited law schools. The competition will select 16 teams – of four students each – to compete. Each school selected to compete may enter no more than one team.

If you are interested in being considered for the CLASSIC, please contact Prof. Schlueter at  dschlueter at stmarytx.edu or at 210-431-2212. The entry fee will be $500.

Yearbook Portraits – Last Chance!

Yes, really.  This is THE LAST CHANCE for you to get your yearbook portrait taken–don’t miss out!

Our photographers will be in the Hark on April 6, 7, 8, 9 from 9:00am to 6:00pm.

They will take appointments at http://www.photoappointment.com, password HLS.  Or just drop by for a walk-in.

And don’t forget to order your yearbook!

Go to http://www.jostens.com to order the 2010 book.  Yearbooks will be shipped to you this summer (despite what it says on Jostens.com) and you can update your address after commencement.  If you’d like the 2009 and 2010 books, you can buy them both for $100 in the Student Journals Office, Hastings (cash & check only).

Questions?  Email  yearbook at law.harvard.edu

Fellowships in Law and Economic Students wishing

Students wishing to apply for a John M. Olin or Terence M. Considine Fellowship in Law and Economics may obtain an information sheet and application on our website at http://www.law.harvard.edu/programs/olin….

Any student at Harvard Law School is eligible to apply for a Fellowship (although it is unusual for students to be Fellows when they are 1Ls). Fellowships, which normally are for a one-year period, involve a stipend of $3,000. Students should submit their applications by Friday, May 14, 2010, in order to be considered for a full year fellowship.

Course/Book Information: THE GHANA PROJECT:Information Session – Change in Application Deadline

An information session for the Ghana Project will take place on Monday, March 29, from 12:15 – 1:30 in Griswold 550.

To apply for the course, send a one-page statement of interest and one-page resume to Ellen Keng ( ekeng at law.harvard.edu) by 5:00pm on WEDNESDAY, March 31.  PLEASE NOTE EXTENSION OF APPLICATION DEADLINE.  Applicants will be notified of their acceptance in advance of the clinical registration deadline.  Email Professor White (lwhite) if you have any questions about the course.

Jobs: LSC Summer Internships

The Legal Services Center (LSC) welcomes applications from Harvard Law School students in their 1L and 2L years for a limited number of internship positions.  LSC offers summer students the opportunity to gain hands-on lawyering experience, direct client contact and court experience, and close supervision from trained clinical instructors in a range of practice areas:  Administrative/ Disability Law; Estate Planning; Health Law & Policy; Post-Foreclosure Eviction Defense/ Housing Law; and Predatory Lending Protection/ Consumer Law.  Students wishing to apply for Summer Internships with LSC should send their resumes and cover letters to the address below to arrive no later than April 1, 2010:

Summer Internship Coordinator
Legal Services Center
122 Boylston Street
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
 jmccorma at law.harvard.edu

Students must indicate in their cover letters their first and second preferences from among the clinics listed below.  More information about the LSC can be found at: http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/cli….

Administrative/Disability Law Clinic

Students who work in the Administrative/Disability Clinic take on cases involving the administrative appeals of disabled clients who have been denied Social Security benefits. In preparing these cases for hearing, students interview and counsel clients, compile the evidentiary record, collaborate with medical providers, and prepare a hearing brief. Appeal hearings are held at Social Security’s Office of Disability Adjudication and Review (ODAR) before Administrative Law Judges (ALJs). At the hearing, the student gives an opening statement, conducts direct examination of the client and cross-examines other witnesses such as vocational experts and medical experts. Under the supervision of experienced attorneys, law students in the Administrative/Disability Clinic have a success rate of over 95% in these ALJ hearings. In rare cases that are not approved by the ALJ, students write appellate briefs to Federal District Court and present oral argument before a federal judge.

Estate Planning Clinic

The Estate Planning Clinic provides direct client representation on estate planning and probate, guardianship, debt counseling, and private insurance cases. The Clinic offers estate and permanency planning services to low- and middle-income individuals in our community, specializing in serving people living with HIV/AIDS, the disabled and the elderly. The Clinic helps clients maximize control over decision-making and secure their children’s future in the event of incapacity or death through the drafting of wills, trusts, powers of attorney, health care proxies, funeral planning directives, living wills, guardianship and relationship agreements. The Clinic also assists survivors and family members in probating the estates of deceased clients.

Student work in the Clinic involves extensive client interviewing and counseling, and often requires frequent communications and negotiations with medical providers, employers and their human resources departments, creditors and insurance companies. Students work closely with clients to develop comprehensive estate plans, analyze government and private insurance benefits, assess clients financial situations and, when necessary, provide debt counseling and bankruptcy services. Estate Planning Clinic guardianship and contested estate probate cases involve representing clients at hearings before state probate court judges.

Health Law & Policy Clinic

Students working in the Health Law & Policy Clinic will participate in a broad spectrum of policy initiatives ranging from state-level legislation regarding HIV testing to national health care reform.  The Clinic’s policy work focuses broadly on initiatives that will increase access to quality, comprehensive health care for poor and low-income individuals and families”especially those living with chronic medical conditions. Students work to inform cutting-edge policy recommendations at the state and national levels in both the legislative and regulatory arenas. State level work is conducted in Massachusetts as well as other states currently, projects are ongoing in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas. Students in the Health Law & Policy practice unit often travel to help facilitate meetings with community partners in these states, attend national policy advocacy conferences, and participate in issue-ba  sed conference calls with community partners. Students working in this clinic can expect to accumulate a wealth of hands-on experience in current and emerging health policy issues. Students conduct legal and fact-based research to inform policy recommendations that take shape as student-generated fact sheets, in-depth reports, comment letters, testimony, presentations, and draft legislation or regulatory guidance.

Post-Foreclosure Eviction Defense Housing Clinic

The Post-Foreclosure Eviction Defense Housing Clinic represents tenants who are facing evictions by banks or other lenders.  Lenders routinely insist on evicting all tenants after foreclosure and in the process misrepresent the rights tenants have under these circumstances.  The Clinic counsels and represents individual tenants in this situation, takes on impact litigation, lobbies on the local, state, and federal levels for greater tenant protections, provides trainings to pro se tenants, housing subsidy providers, social workers and legal services attorneys on tenants rights after foreclosure, and works with community partners and the press to bring public attention to the social problems caused by mass displacement of tenants living in foreclosed buildings.  The bulk of the Clinic’s work consists of litigation in the Boston Housing Court, defending evictions and prosecuting affirmative cases to improve housing conditions and to prevent utilities from being shut-off.

The Clinic also represents individual tenants and tenant groups on a variety of other issues affecting low-income tenants and the low-income housing market in the city of Boston.  These issues include (1) thwarting gentrification by preventing displacement of low-income families from the Boston neighborhoods served by the office; (2) ameliorating indoor environmental hazards – including lead paint, mold, and insect and rodent infestation and otherwise improving the physical condition of housing in Boston’s low-income communities; (3) combating discrimination in the rental market and ensuring housing access and accessibility; and (4) improving the functioning of the various institutions – courts, agencies, etc.-  that affect the lives of low-income tenants.

Students working in the Post-Foreclosure Eviction/Housing Clinic will have numerous opportunities to engage in client interviewing and counseling, fact investigation, pre-trial discovery (including taking and defending depositions), negotiation, and motion practice, as well as to try cases.   Students will also have the opportunity, working with organizers, to engage in community lawyering and mobilization efforts and to work on legislative and other law reform initiatives.

Predatory Lending Prevention /Consumer Protection Clinic

The Predatory Lending/Consumer Protection Clinic focuses its advocacy efforts on preserving and protecting equity for low- and moderate-income homeowners; combating abuses in the consumer financial services industry; and ensuring equal and fair access to credit markets.  The practice is primarily litigation and involves consumer, bankruptcy, real estate, banking, and tort law.  The Clinic defends homeowners against foreclosure and commences complex litigation in Federal District Court, Bankruptcy Court, and Massachusetts Superior Court against subprime lenders, banking institutions, mortgage brokers, loan service’s, and foreclosure rescue scam artists.  The Clinic also maintains a vibrant consumer law practice in which students defend against unlawful debt collection practices in small claims court and represent consumers seeking a fresh start through petitions for bankruptcy.

Students in the Clinic gain extensive experience interviewing clients, analyzing loan documents, drafting complaints, drafting and responding to discovery requests, conducting and defending depositions, negotiating with opposing counsel, arguing motions, and engaging in long-term case strategizing.  Students also have the opportunity to engage in bankruptcy and transactional work; to participate in the Clinics Small Claims Debt Collection Project; and, on occasion, to work on legislative initiatives and impact litigation, particularly regarding patterns of racial discrimination in lending in the Greater Boston credit markets.

Last Chance: Get Photographed for the Yearbook!

Our friends from McGrath studios will be back ONE LAST TIME to shoot portraits for the yearbook.

April 6, 7, 8, and 9th from 9:30-6pm

Location TBA (but probably the Hark).

More details to follow, but mark your calendars as THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE! Don’t miss it!

Questions? Email  yearbook at law.harvard.edu

(And don’t forget to buy your yearbook at http://jostens.com/yearbook/index.asp)

General Interest: HLPR/ACS Progressive Formal Ticket Sales

Tickets for the ACS/HLPR Progressive Formal on Saturday, March 27 will be on sale in the Hark Tuesday 3/23 and Wednesday 3/24 from 12-1pm. Tickets are $20 and will not be available for sale at the door. So buy your ticket in advance!
comments: Progressive Spring Formal
March 27, 2010
8-11pm
Harvard’s Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Ave, Cambridge, MA

The Harvard Law & Policy Review and the HLS American Constitution Society present the annual Progressive Spring Formal! Please join your fellow progressive law students for an evening of drinks, appetizers, three-layer cake, archeology, ethnology, and good company. This year, HLPR and ACS will be holding their marquee social event at Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology. The event will feature a full open bar, appetizers, and dessert. Portions of the museum may be open for viewing as well. Non-Harvard affiliated guests are welcome.

IGLP Workshop Accepting Applications

The Institute for Global Law and Policy is proud to announce our first annual Workshop on Global Law and Economic Policy, June 2-11, 2010 at Harvard Law School.   IGLP: The Workshop is an intensive ten-day residential program designed for doctoral and post-doctoral scholars. The Workshop aims to promote innovative ideas and alternative approaches to issues of global law, economic policy and social justice in the aftermath of the economic crisis.  The initiative will bring young scholars and faculty from around the world together with leading faculty working on issues of global law and economic policy for serious research collaboration and debate.

Hosted by Harvard Law School, The Workshop aims to bring together specialists from across the arts and sciences as well as the professional schools who are interested in the intersections between law, economics and global policy.  Interested HLS LLM’s and JD’s  are encouraged to visit our webpage at http://www.law.harvard.edu/programs/abou… and apply.

HLPR/ACS Progressive Formal Ticket Sales

Tickets for the ACS/HLPR Progressive Formal on Saturday, March 27 will be on sale in the Hark Monday 3/22 to Wednesday 3/24 from 12-1pm. Tickets are $20 and will not be available for sale at the door. So buy your ticket in advance!

Progressive Spring Formal
March 27, 2010
8-11pm
Harvard’s Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Ave, Cambridge, MA

The Harvard Law & Policy Review and the HLS American Constitution Society present the annual Progressive Spring Formal! Please join your fellow progressive law students for an evening of drinks, appetizers, three-layer cake, archeology, ethnology, and good company. This year, HLPR and ACS will be holding their marquee social event at Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology. The event will feature a full open bar, appetizers, and dessert. Portions of the museum may be open for viewing as well. Non-Harvard affiliated guests are welcome.

OCS Peer Advisor Positions Available

The Office of Career Services is seeking applications from current second-year students to serve as OCS Peer Advisors for the 2010-2011 academic year.  Peer Advisors are responsible for assisting OCS staff with our various career-related initiatives.  This involves assisting with career programs, monitoring developments in the legal market, counseling students, conducting career-related research, drafting content for the OCS website and blog and advising the OCS staff on student issues and concerns.  Because of OCS’ close relationships with employers, working in OCS offers a unique perspective on what is happening in the private sector.  Our Early Interview Program at the end of August will offer many opportunities to interact with both students and employers.  Peer Advisors receive $11.00 per hour and work 10-12 hours/week, including paid training sessions.

If you are interested in helping others navigate through the job search process and working as part of the OCS team, then this would be a great opportunity.  Please submit a cover letter and resume via email by Wednesday, March 24 to  jperrigo at law.harvard.edu.  For additional information or questions, please contact Jennifer Perrigo, Assistant Director for J.D. Advising by email at  jperrigo at law.harvard.edu or by phone at 617-495-1628.

Buy your 2010 HLS Yearbook today!

You can buy your book on line with a credit card, or visit the Journals Office in Hastings to pay with cash or check.  The 2010 yearbook is $75 which includes shipping to anywhere you’ll be this summer/next fall (NOTE: even though the Jostens website says that books will come to the school, the books WILL ship to your address!).  You can also purchase both the 2009 yearbook and the 2010 yearbook for $100—this offer is only available through the Journals Office in Hastings.

Want to see you and your friends in the yearbook?  Include YOUR memories of YOUR friends by uploading photographs.  The username is 400008007 and the password is hls (lower-case).  This is a great way to upload group photos of organizations, clubs, and journals.

Congratulatory ads are also a fun way to say thank you to your section, organization, faculty, or friends, or for your friends and family to memorialize your time at HLS and to say WAY TO GO!  Click here for more information on creating a congratulatory ad for this year’s yearbook.

Questions?  Email yearbook@law.harvard.edu.

See you in the yearbook!