HHRJ Seeking Student Writing Submissions

The Harvard Human Rights Journal is currently seeking submissions for pieces for Volume 25.  All JD, LLM, and SJD students are encouraged to submit.

HRJ publishes three different types of student writing:

1. Student Notes
Student notes should ideally be between 5,000 and 10,000 words; please be aware that articles longer than 20,000 words will not be considered. Citations for all pieces should follow Bluebook format. For examples of past student pieces we have published in HRJ, be sure to check out the Archives section of our website at http://www.law.harvard.edu/students/orgs/hrj/.  We plan to publish one student note in Volume 25.

Recent Developments
Recent developments offer summaries and analyses of judicial decisions or legislative developments with human rights implications.  In addition to international tribunals such as the ICTR and ICTY, we are interested in the goings-on at the European Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, and any domestic court (either in the United States or any other country) that has decided a case with human rights implications. Recent developments should be between 2,500 and 5,000 words long.

Book Notes
Book notes are typically between 700 and 1,000 words in length and offer a brief summary and critique of a recent book on human rights.  

For consideration for print publication of a note in the Volume 25, a draft will be due by August 20th, 2011. We encourage those that are interested to let us know of proposals or drafts as soon as possible so we can work with you throughout the writing process.

Please contact the HHRJ student writing editors, Madison Condon ( mcondon at jd13.law.harvard.edu) or Kandis Woods ( kwood at jd13.law.harvard.edu) with any questions!

Summer RA position

Michael Frakes, Assistant Professor of Law at Cornell Law School / Academic Fellow at Harvard Law School’s Petrie-Flom Center, seeks a research assistant this summer to work on a project at the intersection of criminal law and public health.  The project is being funded under a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.  If interested, please submit a resume to Michael Frakes at mfrakes@law.harvard.edu.

Harvard Environmental Law Review Student Note Competition – Submission Deadline July 1st!

Announcing the Volume 36 Student Note Competition for the Harvard Environmental Law Review.

We encourage you to submit papers and notes on any environment-related topic for our annual student note competition.  First and second place winners receive a cash prize, and the winning piece will be published in ELR’s next issue.  Papers must be 20-100 pages, double-spaced in 12-point font.  Published notes are available on the ELR website; past winners include Daniel Mach (Class of 2011, published at 35 Harv. Envtl. L. Rev. 205) and Kate Bowers (Class of 2009, published at 34 Harv. Envtl. L. Rev. 257).  Submission deadline is July 1st!

Submissions should be sent to our Student Note Competition Coordinator, Leslie Griffith at  lgriffith at jd13.law.harvard.edu.  Any questions can be directed to  hlselr at gmail.com.

Summer Diversity Project Research Assistants

Professor David Wilkins is looking for one or more summer RAs to work with him on a project on diversity in the legal profession, with a particular emphasis on the careers of black corporate lawyers.  The project builds on Professor Wilkins’s extensive scholarship in this area (including most recently his 2010 article “The New Social Engineers in the Age of Obama:  Black Corporate Lawyers and the Making of the First Black President”) and involves research on the current diversity in large law firms, in-house legal departments, and other parts of the corporate sector of  the legal profession, as well as the role that black corporate lawyers are have and continue to play in various sectors of this country’s political, social, and economic life. It is not necessary that the RAs be in Cambridge, but must have access to Lexis/Nexis or other similar online research tools and be willing to devote significant time to the project during July and August. There will be an o
pportunity to continue working during the academic year. As Professor Wilkins will be traveling out of the country for most of June all resumes and questions should be directed to Erik Ramanathan, Executive Director of the Program on the Legal Profession at  eramanathan at law.harvard.edu

Harvard Environmental Law Review Student Note Competition – Submission Deadline July 1st!

The Harvard Environmental Law Review is pleased to announce its Volume 36 Student Note Competition.

We encourage you to submit papers and notes on any environment-related topic for our annual student note competition.  First and second place winners receive a cash prize, and the winning piece will be published in ELR’s next issue.  Papers must be 20-100 pages, double-spaced in 12-point font.  Published notes are available on the ELR website; past winners include Daniel Mach (Class of 2011, published at 35 Harv. Envtl. L. Rev. 205) and Kate Bowers (Class of 2009, published at 34 Harv. Envtl. L. Rev. 257).  Submission deadline is July 1st!

Submissions should be sent to our Student Note Competition Coordinator, Leslie Griffith at  lgriffith at jd13.law.harvard.edu.  Any questions can be directed to  hlselr at gmail.com.

ILJ Seeking Student Writing for Publication

The International Law Journal is seeking writing pieces by HLS students for publication.  All HLS JD, LLM, and SJD candidates are invited to submit. 

Options:

We are looking to publish three types of writing on international law topics in both print and online:

     1.          Notes.  Student notes are works usually between 10,000 and 20,000 words (not counting footnotes).  We will choose one note for publication in both print editions for the academic year; however, there is no ceiling on the number of notes we can publish online.

      2.        Commentaries.  Case commentaries are short works (around 5,000 words) focused upon a recent case from an international court/tribunal or a U.S. case involving international law.  Commentaries will be published online.

      3.        Book reviews.  ILJ is excited to begin publishing book reviews next year.  A book review should be around 2,000- 3,000 words and provide an examination of or reflection on an interesting topic or trend running through 2-3 recently published books in international law.  For a stylistic and organizational model, check out works published in the New York Review of Books.

What to Do Now: 

In the next few weeks, consider a topic area in which you have a strong interest.   Then, draft a brief proposal (no more than a couple paragraphs) with a thesis and explanation of your interest.  For a commentary, identify the case upon which you plan to focus.  For a book review, identify the books you plan to read and review.

If you have already completed a writing project for a course or an independent writing project, a proposal is not necessary. 

ILJ commits to publishing all strong proposals, whether online or in print.  The Notes Editors will be in touch with students shortly after the proposals have been submitted with publication commitments and/or suggestions for moving forward.

Deadlines: 

Please submit a brief proposal or if already completed, the draft to  hlsiljnotes at gmail.com by June 30, 2011.  For consideration for print publication of a note in the next print issue (Winter 2012), a draft will be due by August 15, 2011.   All others should submit by the beginning of classes for online publication during the fall semester.

Topic Ideas:

Any international law topics or domestic cases involving international law.  Ideas include ATS litigation, international investment arbitration, WTO negotiations and recent cases, private international law and maritime law, the human rights regime, comparative constitutional law, international development, and transnational crime.

Research Assistant needed

Climenko Fellow Jill Goldenziel seeks research assistant for project dealing with International Migration, International Law, Refugees, and the Middle East.  Pay will be at the standard rate; hours will be flexible during June.  Please e-mail  jgoldenziel at law.harvard.edu with a resume and cover letter indicating your interest.