Beagle Fellowship at NRDC

“BEAGLE/HLS FELLOWSHIP AT NRDC”

History and Purposes
The Beagle/HLS Fellowship at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) provides graduating HLS students and recent alumni with a two-year funded litigation position at NRDC.  The Fellowship has been established by a generous gift to Harvard Law School by the Beagle Foundation that was created by Joy Covey ’89.  The purposes of the Fellowship are to create a two-year job at NRDC for a recent HLS graduate (the “Fellow”); to provide training and supervision for the Fellow; to enhance the Fellow’s lawyering/litigation skills; and to promote the Fellow’s interest in pursuing a career in nonprofit litigation and environmental law.”

“Beagle/HLS Fellowship at NRDC Guidelines”
Eligibility
The Beagle/HLS Fellowship will be awarded to graduating Harvard Law School students,
judicial clerks or recent alumni (up to three years out of law school).  Barring exceptional circumstances, preference will be given to law clerks and third-year students.  Applicants must be available to start work the fall following their application.

Selection Criteria
The Fellows are selected by NRDC and a HLS Committee appointed by Dean Minow. NRDC and the Committee seek Fellows, who have demonstrated an interest in, and commitment to, nonprofit law, especially environmental law, and who demonstrate promise for an outstanding career in nonprofit law.  This interest and commitment may be demonstrated through their prior public service experience, personal essays, recommendations, extracurricular activities, law school course work, academic achievements, and current work plans.

Placement
Beagle Fellows for 2012-2014 will be placed in the NRDC in Washington, DC or San
Francisco.  NRDC will try to honor the Fellow’s geographic preference.

Fellowship Awards
The Fellowship award will be the starting salary for a new attorney or fellow at NRDC, according to the NRDC scale.  For the year, 2010-2011, the salary was approximately $50-55K.  NRDC will provide medical benefits for each Fellow equivalent to those provided to other NRDC employees, and will cover overhead expenses.

Application Materials and Procedures:
•    A cover letter which should include a statement about which NRDC office the applicant would prefer to work in and which offices the applicant would consider working in.
•    Resume
•    Law school transcript
•    Writing sample
•    References (three)
•    Two letters of recommendation, preferably including one from an HLS faculty member
•    A personal essay

Applications should be received by the Environmental Law Program, addressed to
Kathy Curley, no later than September 30, 2011. Select applicants will be invited to interview with NRDC and must participate in the interview to be further considered for the Fellowship.
Questions may be directed to Kathy Curley, Environmental Law Program, Hauser
406, at (617) 495-3097 or  curley at law.harvard.edu.  Applications and correspondence should be sent to:
Beagle/HLS Fellowship at NRDC
Environmental Law Program
Harvard Law School
1575 Massachusetts Avenue
Hauser 406
Cambridge, MA  02138

Award Decisions
Applicants will be notified about the outcome of the selection process in October. Each Fellow’s salary will be treated as Low Income Protection Program (HLS’s loan
repayment program).  Each Fellow will be eligible, through HLS, for consideration
for Kaufman and Skirnick supplemental funding.

Get Your Legal Writing Noticed: Apply to Write for the Harvard Law & Policy Review Blog

Apply to contribute to the Harvard Law & Policy Review blog and bring your law and policy analysis to approximately 4,000 visitors a month. The HLPR Blog: Notice and Comment (http://hlpronline.com/category/blog/) is now accepting entries to its annual writing competition, through which we select contributors for the forthcoming academic year.

Contributors will be expected to contribute one post each week, from September 12, 2011 until September 15, 2012. These posts will generally be short (50 to 250 words), such as summaries of emerging legal issues, commentary with links, or brief analyses of current events. Occasionally, bloggers will write longer posts or series. Contributors should be sharp writers who can provide interesting content and analysis to a progressive audience. Some of our most popular posts are here and here. Contributors frequently are, but are not required to be, law students or lawyers. In return for their contributions, bloggers will gain experience in an increasingly important media format and exposure to national audience. They will also receive preference when submitting longer articles for publication in the journal.

The Harvard Law & Policy Review is the official journal of the American Constitution Society. Our last issue was distributed to over 6,000 attorneys, scholars, judges, students, and policymakers, as well as selected congressional offices and law libraries. Past contributors to the journal include Senator Tom Udall and Professor Suzette M. Malveaux.

Please submit your application by September 5, 2011. If you have questions, email blog+apply@hlpronline.com.  The application is available here:
https://spreadsheets0.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEl3ZVlMb1JhYVFHQ3ZBRWU3TFhKcWc6MA#gid=0

Discussion group: MUSLIMS IN EUROPE: Multiculturalism, Cultural Clash, Human Rights.

MUSLIMS IN EUROPE: Multiculturalism, Cultural Clash, Human Rights.  Professor Emeritus Henry Steiner and Visiting Professor Chibli Mallat offer this interactive discussion group in the fall semester 2011.  The group is a personal project of the two professors, and not a course offered for credit by Harvard Law School.  Students joining the group, which will be limited to ten persons, gain no academic credit.  The discussion group requires neither an examination nor a paper, nor does it require any previous HLS course.  The group will meet at 5:00-7:00 p.m. on five Wednesdays during the fall semester.  Materials of reasonable length will be provided and participants are expected to read them before class discussion.      

The course examines heightened Muslim immigration to Europe in recent decades from North Africa, the Middle East and South Asia, and nationalist reactions to this heightened presence.   Our  discussions address conflicts of a cultural, political and legal character arising in Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and the U.K., as well as comparative analysis about the growing Muslim population in the U.S. and banning by several states of references by state courts to Shari’a.  After introductory readings on cultural relativism in the context of female genital mutilation in Africa, the materials illustrate the interrelated cultural, political and legal dimensions of the European conflicts through current issues about Muslim girls/women wearing headscarves/burqas, the building of mosques/minarets, speech or action viewed by Muslims as blasphemy or hate speech, and crucifixes in public classrooms that may offend Muslims. The human rights issues implicate freedoms of thought, expression, religion, and association; gender and ethnic discrimination; cultural identity and survival; self-determination; and rights of parents.  Discussions will consider international and regional human rights systems in relation to national laws and constitutions.

Professor Mallat was born in Lebanon and principally educated there.   An expert on Shari’a, he has taught courses on that topic, the Middle East, international law, and human rights at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London;  St. Joseph’s University, Beirut; the law school of the University of Utah; and HLS.  Professor Steiner founded the HLS Human Rights Program in 1984 and served as its director until he became professor emeritus in 2005.

Students considering whether to join this group should send an email not later than September 14th  to hsteiner@law.harvard.edu, indicating briefly why they wish to participate, attaching a c.v., and asking any questions they may have.  The subject line of such emails should be marked: Discussion Group.  Reply emails will give more information about meetings and topics.  Those admitted will be notified not later than September 16th, and materials will then be distributed. The group will meet for its first session on Wednesday, September 21st. The four remaining sessions will take place on Wednesday October 5, October 19, November 2 and November 9.

Harvard Law School Communications Office seeks experienced journalists

Experienced writers wanted immediately to report on Law School events and to write pieces for the school’s print publications and website.

Strong organizational and interpersonal skills are critical. Must be detail-oriented, accurate, able to meet deadlines, and work well independently and as part of a team. Proficiency with Lexis Nexis, Westlaw and other online research tools is required.

Please submit a resume and writing samples to  lgrant at law.harvard.edu. Call 617-495 3368 for further information.

POSITION IN JAPANESE LAW FIRM 2012-13

One of Japan’s foremost law firms seeks a talented student to work for one year following graduation (September 2012-August 2013) in its Tokyo office.  The firm has a varied and interesting transactional and litigation practice representing both Japanese and foreign clients (including a number on a pro bono basis). Although not large, it employs many Harvard graduates.

Applicants should have strong legal credentials. Japanese language skill is not required, though welcomed. Recent graduates who have worked in this firm have had very favorable experiences. Compensation and other terms are competitive.

Students interested in applying should submit their resume and a short letter regarding their qualifications via email to Professor William Alford (alford) and cc Emma Johnson (johnson) no later than Thursday, September 15, 2011.

ALFORD / BLUM INTERNATIONAL LAW WORKSHOP – FIRST DAY MANDATORY

Please note, you MUST attend the first class (Wed Sept 14) if you wish to take the class — including if you are on the waitlist or if you are considering trying to add it. The first class is Wed Sept 14 at 5pm in Pound 204. The ILW will meet every Wed from 5 to 7 pm, Sept 14 to Dec 7, in Pound 204 except for the following dates: There is no class Wed Sept 28 — it will be held instead on Friday, September 30, 3 to 5pm. There is no class Wed Nov 9 — it will be held instead on Friday, November 11, 3 to 5pm.

Creative Writers’ Group

With the assistance of Rose Moss, and under the auspices of the Law and the Arts Initiative, Professor Janet Halley invites students to join a Creative Writers’ Group in the fall of 2011.

We welcome applications from HLS students with prose fiction, memoir and biography projects, who wish to join a weekly group in the Fall Semester, to discuss their works in progress. 

The group is for J.D. and graduate students in the Law School.  Meetings will take place on Wednesdays, 3-4:30pm through the Fall Semester.  Regular attendance will be important. Members of the group will submit work regularly for class discussion.  Rose Moss will assign some passages or short stories for participants to read.  No direct academic credit is provided for membership in the group, but Janet Halley will offer to provide a 1-credit independent-study supervision to students in the course, and has a list of other faculty also willing to consider such arrangements.

To inquire or apply, email a 1-page statement of interest to Rose Moss at  rosermoss at gmail.com. We will admit students on a rolling basis, and we will let you know by September 7. 

The first meeting will take place Wednesday, September 21 at 3-4:30pm, location TBA (you will learn this detail in your admission email).

Case study Writers Wanted

Professor Heymann would like several students to write case studies (i.e., short accounts of actual events that are adequately detailed to be revealing of an underlying structure) of several significant decisions either by prosecutors or by other government officials.  The case study may satisfy the 3rd year paper requirement, depending on its subject and the depth of the analysis.  If interested, please send a resume and email to Jane Reader ( jreader at law.harvard.edu) in order to schedule a meeting with Professor Heymann.

Professor Donahue Seeks RA’s for Fall and Spring

Professor Donahue is seeking RA’s for a number of projects that involve applying technical computer skills to materials (mostly in Latin) that concern European legal history. A major project, for example, involves paginating for online publication an edition of a court book from a church court in 14th century England. Interested students should send to Jane Reader (HA581,  jreader at law.harvard.edu) the following information: (1) a letter indicating your area(s) of interest, relevant background, and amount of time available, (2) a resume, and (3) a law school transcript (informal is fine). 1Ls are encouraged to apply. Please substitute undergraduate information for item #3.)

Teaching Assistant

Professor Hay needs a teaching assistant for an undergraduate course on Crime and the Constitution, a basic survey including conventional criminal law topics but extending into areas such as the free speech and substantive due process.  Interested students should send an email to Carol Igoe at  cigoe at law.harvard.edu.

Prof. Kaplow Hiring RAs For Fall

Professor Kaplow is looking for a number of research assistants, mainly for antitrust. Please send to Molly Eskridge (HA318A,  meskridge at law.harvard.edu) the following information: (1) a letter indicating your area(s) of interest, relevant background, and amount of time available, (2) a resume, and (3) a law school transcript (informal is fine). 1Ls are encouraged to apply. Please substitute undergraduate information for item #3.)

RA Wanted for Corporate Finance Research

Elisabeth de Fontenay, Climenko Fellow and Lecturer on Law, is seeking a research assistant for the 2011-2012 academic year.  Her current research projects focus primarily on Corporate Finance, particularly debt-financing.  One or more projects will have an empirical component, so some familiarity with quantitative methods and statistical analysis would be welcome.  Interested students should contact Ms. de Fontenay at  edefontenay at law.harvard.edu.  Please indicate how much time on average per week you wish to devote to RA work.

POSITION IN JAPANESE LAW FIRM 2012-13

POSITION IN JAPANESE LAW FIRM 2012-13
***
One of Japan’s foremost law firms seeks a talented student to work for one year following graduation (September 2012-August 2013) in its Tokyo office.  The firm has a varied and interesting transactional and litigation practice representing both Japanese and foreign clients (including a number on a pro bono basis). Although not large, it employs many Harvard graduates.

Applicants should have strong legal credentials. Japanese language skill is not required, though welcomed. Recent graduates who have worked in this firm have had very favorable experiences. Compensation and other terms are competitive.

Students interested in applying should submit their resume and a short letter regarding their qualifications via email to Professor William Alford (alford) and cc Emma Johnson (johnson) no later than Thursday, September 15, 2011.

Course Information and First Assignment – Contracts 7 – Prof. Rakoff

Course Information and First Assignment for Contracts 7 – Professor Todd Rakoff – Fall 2011:  There will be one casebook and one source materials supplement for this course:  (1) Steven J. Burton, “Principles of Contract Law” – Third Edition (2006), and (2) Steven J. Burton & Melvin A. Eisenberg (eds.), “Contract Law: Selected Source Materials” – 2011 Edition.  (They are available at the Law School Coop.)  For our first meeting on Wednesday, August 31, please read pages 1-16 in the casebook and the provisions of the Restatement of Contracts (which can be found in the supplement) that are referred to in those pages.  I would appreciate your not bringing laptops (or comparable electronic devices) to class this semester.

Seminar on International Finance

The research Seminar on International Finance, co-taught by Professors Jackson and Scott, has limited openings for J.D. students. While students are free to write papers on topics of their own choosing, the Seminar will concentrate this year on international coordination of regulatory policy and the European debt crisis.  A number of prominent speakers will be guest lecturers, including Simon Gleeson, Partner, Clifford Chance, London, Mark Sobel, U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Monetary and Financial Policy, U.S. Department of the Treasury, Jürgen Stark, Member of the Executive Board, European Central Bank, Eddy Wymeersch, Chairman, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI) and Zhu Min, Deputy Managing Director, International Monetary Fund.  The Seminar meets periodically over the course of the Fall and Spring semesters.  Many past papers have been published.  The Seminar is by permission only. To apply, send a statement of interest to  hscott at law.harvard.edu or  hjackson at law.harvard.edu.