Independent Clinical Opportunity in Washington D.C. and Tanzania

The New Markets Lab (www.newmarketslab.org) is able to accept a number of independent clinical students in January 2015. Students will see firsthand the impact that the commercial, legal and regulatory environment can have on economic growth in Tanzania. Students will be exposed to the role that government, business and international institutions can play in encouraging agricultural development at the grassroots level.

The initial workshops will take place in Washington D.C. and will be followed by practical work in Tanzania. For more information about the project and application process please contact ispaho@law.harvard.edu 

Winter Term Independent Clinical Opportunities at Rural Development NGO in India

The Sehgal Foundation (http://www.smsfoundation.org/ ) works with rural communities to create sustainable programs for managing water resources, increasing agricultural productivity and strengthening rural governance, with an emphasis on gender equality and women’s empowerment.

They are seeking two Winter Term students for the following projects:

1. Analyzing the roles of institutions and citizens in delivery of subsidized food grain delivery programs in two villages of Mewat district, Haryana.

2. Identifying gaps in English language legal research resources for law students in legal aid clinics and lawyers working with rural people eligible for civil legal services under the Legal Services Authority system in India and preparing a recommendation for a coordinated effort to fill those gaps by law schools and others.

 

For additional information, please contact Jill Crockett (jcrockett@law.harvard.edu) in the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs.

CLINICAL OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN the SPRING 2015 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW COURSES

If you are currently enrolled in Prof. Stephenson’s spring 2015 Administrative Law, there is an opportunity to do clinical work with the Massachusetts Division of Administrative Law Appeals (DALA), located at 1 Congress Street, 11th Floor, Boston. Students interested in working with Magistrates at the Massachusetts Division of Administrative Law Appeals (DALA) will assist with the resolution of appeals from a variety of state agencies starting with the arrival of the appeal at DALA until the final DALA decision is rendered. For each case assigned to a student, this can mean attending the pre-hearing conference, the hearing, consultation with the magistrate assigned to write the decision, research and drafting for the magistrate’s decision as well as the feedback and editing process with the magistrate. Students may have the option of selecting the subject matter of the appeal they handle as the magistrates at DALA hear and decide appeals from various state agencies including Retirement Boards, the Board of Registration in Medicine, the Department of Public Health, the Civil Service Commission, the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Veterans’ Services.

Students are expected to be available for at least one full day a week at the DALA office in Boston. Students may earn clinical credits as follows: 2 clinical credits = ten hours of week of work; 3 clinical credits = 15 hours of work per week; and 4 clinical credits = 20 hours of work per week.

To apply please submit a resume and brief writing sample (no more than 10 pages) to Liz Solar at esolar@law.harvard.edu 

Seeking Students for the Clinical and Pro Bono Programs Student Advisory Committee – Deadline 9/15

The Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs (OCP) is seeking students from all class years (including LLM) to sit on its Student Advisory Committee and contribute their ideas and suggestions regarding curriculum, new projects and legal practice placements, policies, and law firm pro bono among other things. Members of the Committee serve as liaisons, facilitating communication between the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs and students, clinical faculty, and the law school administration. The Committee helps the Office identify and address current needs, serves as a sounding board as the Office implements program changes, and assists in strategizing about future programming. The Committee will meet approximately three times a semester, and lunch and treats will be served. Interested students should send a resume and a brief email expressing interest and availability to Ina Spaho at ispaho@law.harvard.edu by Monday, September 15th, 2014. 

Fall Semester Pro Bono Tax Law Opportunity

The Legal Services Center (LSC) of Harvard Law School is seeking volunteer law students to work with our Pro Bono Low-Income Taxpayer Project. Through the Project, LSC represents local low-income taxpayers before the IRS and in Tax Court. Most cases involve controversies with the IRS relating to the Earned Income Tax Credit, Child Tax Credit, dependency exemptions, and similar issues. Some cases also involve collection matters, such as installment agreements and offers in compromise. Under the guidance of an experienced tax attorney who has worked both in the IRS Office of Chief Counsel and as a public interest lawyer on behalf of low-income taxpayers, students will likely have opportunities to participate in client interviews, conduct legal research, develop case strategy, engage in evidence gathering, draft advocacy letters to the IRS, and/or draft Tax Court petitions. Students should expect to make a minimum time commitment of two to three hours per week. Some of the work will need to be completed at LSC’s community-based location (the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston), but some work can also be completed remotely from campus. Students can either volunteer during the entirety of the fall semester or for a shorter interval. Interested students—or those with questions—should send an email to dkensinger2013 at clinics.law.harvard.edu. Applicants should briefly describe the basis for their interest and should attach a resume. More information about the Legal Services Center can be found here: http://www.legalservicescenter.org/

SEC Boston Office Externship – Spring 2015

The United States Securities and Exchange Commission Boston office is seeking 1-2 HLS students spring term to work 15– 20 hours per week. Students who participate in the SEC internship must also complete a security clearance coordinated by the SEC office. Students must be U.S. Citizens to apply. Students will earn 3 or 4 clinical credits through the independent clinical work program. Three clinical credits are equal to 15 hours of work per week and 4 clinical credits are equal to 20 hours of work per week. Pre and co-requisites: Interested applications must have taken or plan to take (and successfully enroll) in the fall or spring Security Regulations course. To apply, please submit a cover letter, resume, transcript, and writing sample resume to clinical@law.harvard.edu . SEC may invite students to interview by telephone or in-person. Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis; however, decisions will be made by late summer/early fall. Cover letters should be addressed to Ms. Caitlyn Campbell, Senior Counsel, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 33 Arch Street, 23rd Floor, Boston, MA 02110. In your cover letter, include any relevant background and whether you can work 15 or 20 hours (please note that the SEC prefers students who can work 20 hours per week, but will consider students who can work 15+ hours per week), the semester in which you would like to work, and if you have taken or plan to take Securities Regulation. The SEC will make selections among applicants; however, please do not send applications directly to the SEC, but to clinical@law.harvard.edu. For more information: Please schedule a meeting with Liz Solar at esolar@law.harvard.edu.

SEC – Boston Office Externship

The United States Securities and Exchange Commission Boston office is seeking 1-2 HLS students fall and spring terms to work 15– 20 hours per week. Students who participate in the SEC internship must also complete a security clearance coordinated by the SEC office. The application deadline is 5pm on May 16, 2014.

Students will earn 3 or 4 clinical credits through the independent clinical work program. Three clinical credits are equal to 15 hours of work per week and 4 clinical credits are equal to 20 hours of work per week. Pre and co-requisites: Interested applications must have taken or plan to take (and successfully enroll) in the fall or spring Security Regulations course.

To apply, please submit a cover letter and resume to  clinical at law.harvard.edu by 5pm on Friday May 16, 2014. Cover letters should be addressed to Mr. Eric A. Forni, Senior Counsel, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 33 Arch Street, 23rd Floor, Boston, MA 02110. In your cover letter, include any relevant background and whether you can work 15 or 20 hours (please note that the SEC prefers students who can work 20 hours per week, but will consider students who can work 15+ hours per week), the semester in which you would like to work, and if you have taken or plan to take Securities Regulation. The SEC will make selections among applicants; however, please do not send applications directly to the SEC, but to  clinical at law.harvard.edu. For more information: Please schedule a meeting with Liz Solar at  esolar at law.harvard.edu.

Semester in Washington Clinic – Apply Now!

Interested in government? Civil rights? Environmental justice? National security? Check out the HLS Semester in Washington Clinic! This clinical program is an extraordinary opportunity to work at the intersection of government, policy, and practice while pursuing your particular interests. Clinic participants spend the spring semester (or winter and spring semesters) living in Washington and working as legal interns in federal offices in the Executive, Legislative, or Judicial Branches. The placements, in offices where lawyers provide legal advice and assistance on policy, legislative, or regulatory matters, are matched to the students’ interests. For example, students interested in topics similar to you have found placements at the Department of Justice, State Department, and Defense Intelligence Agency (to name just a few). To learn more about the program, take a look at the clinic’s iSite  http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?key…), where you can find information on the course portion of the program, see the students who have participated in the past and their placements, and more. Finally, if you have any questions or want to discuss how the clinic might help further your goals, you can email the Clinic Director, Jonathan Wroblewski, at  jwroblewski at law.harvard.edu or give him a call at 202-514-4730. He’d love to hear from you! If you have questions about the logistics of the program (housing, travel, credits, registration, etc.) you can email Maggie Bay in the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs ( mbay at law.harvard.edu). The initial application deadline for the Clinic is August 15, 2014. Apply now!

Clinical Opportunity for Collaborative, Community-Based Transactional Work – Apply Now!

The Community Enterprise Project (“CEP”) of the Transactional Law Clinics offers an opportunity for a group of students to undertake clinical work rooted in community development and transactional law. CEP students will connect with community organizations, identify organizational and community legal needs, and develop comprehensive strategies to address those needs while gaining valuable, real-world transactional law experience. The spring curriculum for CEP students will be two-fold. First, students will work collaboratively on projects undertaken by CEP and community partner organizations to address a particular legal need of the partner organization or its constituents, through written materials, workshops, or other means. Second, CEP students will complete real estate, small business, and/or non-profit cases for direct clients generated either through the Transactional Law Clinics or through the work of the Community Enterprise Project. Please note that CEP students must commit to completing approximately half of their clinical hours each week on Wednesdays and/or Thursdays at the Harvard Legal Services Center in Jamaica Plain. To apply, please submit a statement of interest (no more than 200 words), resume, and academic transcript (unofficial or official). In your cover email, please indicate whether you have a preference for taking CEP in Fall or Spring semester. Applications should be addressed to Brian Price and Amanda Kool and submitted via e-mail to  akool at law.harvard.edu and  clinical at law.harvard.edu. Interested students are encouraged to apply as soon as possible, and all applications must be submitted by Thursday, April 3rd. Students will be notified of decisions on Monday, April 7th. If accepted, students will register for 3 or 4 clinical credits through the Transactional Law Clinics and 2 course credits for the associated clinical seminar. Continuing TLC students may take CEP for 2, 3, or 4 credits and do not need to register in the associated clinical seminar.

Legal Services Center Summer Interns Program

Use your 1L or 2L summer to get the best experience you’ll have in law school (according to our alumni!) at the crown jewel of HLS clinical offerings, and get to know Boston better exploring the neighborhood gems within easy reach of LSC. Spending the summer with us is the best way to guarantee you’ll have this experience, since semester based clinical placements are often over-enrolled. Summer interns are unpaid but eligible for all public interest fellowships including SPIF and EJA. Opportunities are available in the following clinics: Disability Litigation and Benefits Advocacy Clinic Estate Planning Clinic Post Foreclosure Eviction Defense Housing Clinic Predatory Lending/Consumer Protection Clinic Predatory Lending/Consumer Protection Clinic – Student Lending/For-Profit Colleges Project Veterans Legal Clinic For additional info and how to apply see: http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/cli…

Summer Interns Program – Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation

Program Dates: May 27 – August 1, 2014 PROGRAM INFORMATION: For program inquiries please contact  lscsummer at law.harvard.edu Summer internship opportunities are currently available in the Health Law & Policy Clinic at the Center for Health Law & Policy Innovation (CHLPI) of Harvard Law School. Use your 1L or 2L summer to get the best experience you’ll have in law school (according to our alumni!) at the crown jewel of Harvard Law School clinical offerings, and get to know Boston better exploring the neighborhood gems within easy reach of the Center for Health Law & Policy Innovation (CHLPI) in Jamaica Plain. Spending the summer with us is the best way to guarantee you’ll have this experience, since semester based clinical placements are usually over-enrolled. These positions focus heavily on policy research and analysis, and involve writing technical and non-technical legislative and regulatory summaries as well as providing technical assistance to states and community-based organizations regarding healthcare reform, Medicaid programming, and new strategies to increase access to care for underserved populations. Students interested in being a summer intern at the Center must commit to work 35-40 hours per week for the duration of the program. HOW TO APPLY: The 2014 summer program runs from Tuesday, May 27th to Friday, August 1st for a minimum of 35-40 hours per week. Application is by email including cover letter and resume to  lscsummer at law.harvard.edu. Applications will be received and reviewed on a rolling basis until opportunities are filled. Summer interns are unpaid but eligible for all public interest fellowships including SPIF and EJA. More Information about the Center for Health Law & Policy Innovation: The Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School (CHLPI) advocates for legal, regulatory, and policy reforms to improve the health of underserved populations, with a focus on the needs of low-income people living with chronic illnesses and disabilities. CHLPI works with consumers, advocates, community-based organizations, health and social services professionals, food providers and producers, government officials, and others to expand access to high-quality healthcare and nutritious, affordable food; to reduce health disparities; to develop community advocacy capacity; and to promote more equitable and effective healthcare and food systems. CHLPI is a clinical teaching program of Harvard Law School and mentors students to become skilled, innovative, and thoughtful practitioners as well as leaders in health, public health, and food law and policy.

Calling all 1Ls: Register for the 61st Annual Williston Negotiation Competition by Feb. 17

Sign up for HLS’s annual simulated negotiation competition for 1Ls, hosted by the Harvard Negotiators and the Board of Student Advisors. No experience necessary–just sign up with a partner or as an individual for this contract negotiation and drafting competition. The competition will take place from Mar. 3 to 10 and involves negotiating with your team on your own time. Average time spent is 10 to 20 hours. Cash prize and names on a plaque in Langdell! Questions? Contact Natasha (nsarin@jd14.law.harvard.edu).


Register with this form by Feb.17:

 https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1O7Xs1GE…

Spring Semester Pro Bono Tax Law Opportunity Representing Low-Income Taxpayers at the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School

The Legal Services Center (LSC) of Harvard Law School is seeking law students with an interest in tax law to do pro bono work with our Tax Law Project. The Tax Law Project is a new initiative at LSC focused on representing local low-income taxpayers before the IRS. Most cases involve controversies with the IRS relating to the Earned Income Tax Credit, Child Tax Credit, dependency exemptions, and similar issues. Some cases also involve collection matters, such as installment agreements and offers in compromise. Under the guidance of an experienced tax attorney, students will likely have opportunities to participate in client interviews, conduct legal research, develop case strategy, engage in evidence gathering, draft advocacy letters to the IRS, and/or draft Tax Court petitions. Students should expect to make a minimum time commitment of two to three hours per week. Some of the work will need to be completed at LSC’s community-based location (the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston), but some work can also be completed remotely from campus. Students can either work with the Tax Law Project during the entirety of the spring semester or for a shorter interval. Interested students—or those with questions—should send an email to dkesinger2013 at clinics.law.harvard.edu. Applicants should briefly describe the basis for their interest in the Tax Law Project and should attach a resume.

Fluent Spanish Speaker Needed for Project on Food Security in Bolivia

The Food Law and Policy Clinic is seeking a student who is a fluent Spanish speaker to conduct research, draft memos, and participate on conference calls with the Food Policy Council in La Paz, Bolivia. The Food Clinic is providing assistance to the Council, a group of community and government leaders, as they create a comprehensive food policy responsive to the needs of La Paz’s residents. The student will assist this process by helping the council identify the most pressing food issues in La Paz, and will conduct legal and policy research to help inform their policy development. The student will gain valuable experience in community organizing, policy analysis and training, cross-cultural work, and urban food security. This is a semester-long commitment for the Spring of 2014, with the option to extend into the Fall 2014 semester. To conduct this research, the student can choose to either enroll in the Food Clinic (for a minimum of 2 credits) or apply for a research assistant position. If enrolled in the Clinic, the student would be required to also enroll in the Food Law and Policy Seminar (2 credits). As a research assistant, the student would receive a stipend for their work, but would receive no course credit. If interested, please send a resume and brief statement of interest to Ona Balkus, Clinical Fellow in the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic, at  obalkus at law.harvard.edu.

Summer Interns Program – Legal Services Center and Center for Health Law & Policy Innovation

Use your 1L or 2L summer to get the best experience you’ll have in law school (according to our alumni!) at the crown jewel of HLS clinical offerings, and get to know Boston better exploring the neighborhood gems within easy reach of LSC. Spending the summer with us is the best way to guarantee you’ll have this experience, since semester based clinical placements are often over-enrolled. Summer interns are unpaid but eligible for all public interest fellowships including SPIF and EJA. Opportunities are available in the following clinics: ■Disability Litigation and Benefits Advocacy Clinic ■Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation (formerly the Health Law and Policy Clinic) ■Estate Planning Clinic ■Food Law and Policy Clinic (a division of the Center for Heath Law and Policy Innovation) ■Post Foreclosure Eviction Defense Housing Clinic ■Predatory Lending/Consumer Protection Clinic ■Predatory Lending/Consumer Protection Clinic – Student Lending/For-Profit Colleges Project ■Veterans Legal Clinic For additional info and how to apply see: http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/cli…

Want to join and/or lead Client Projects in ADR/Conflict Management?

Harvard Negotiators is currently recruiting team leaders and members to work on three exciting client projects this semester. Our client projects focus on a range of issues, both international and domestic in nature, and are a fantastic opportunity for students to work with real world clients in the fields of negotiation, dispute resolution, and conflict management. Team leaders should be prepared to commit 3-5 hours a week to their project; general participation can range from an hour a week. Interested students can find out more about the client projects at the following events: HLS SPO Panel, 6.30pm, Sept. 16, WCC 2019, ADR Night, 5pm, Sept. 17, Pound 513, Student Activities Fair, 6.30pm, Sept. 19, Milstein East ABC. If you have any other questions or would like more details, please email the Client Projects Manager Laurence Hull at lhull at jd15.law.harvard.edu. Harvard Negotiators requires all students who have not taken the Negotiation Workshop to attend a mandatory training session on Saturday, September 28th.

Shareholder Rights Project Openings

Are you planning on working in corporate law? Interested in getting clinical experience working on corporate law and corporate governance matters? The Shareholder Rights Project is seeking participants for its 2013-2014 clinical program. The Shareholder Rights program, taught by Professor Lucian Bebchuk and Scott Hirst, provides students with the opportunity to obtain hands-on experience with shareholder rights work. The SRP works on behalf of public pension funds and charitable organizations seeking to improve corporate governance at publicly traded companies in which they are shareowners, as well as on research and policy projects related to corporate governance. Enrollment requires an application process and is open to Harvard Law School 2L, 3L and LLM students who have taken Corporations or are taking Corporations in the Fall term. LLM students with prior corporate experience may speak with the instructor about waiving this requirement. To apply, students must submit a statement of interest (maximum 200 words), a resume, an academic transcript (unofficial or official), and can elect to submit a writing sample of no more than 15 pages (one sample only). Applications should be addressed to the instructors and submitted to Emily Lewis at  emlewis at law.harvard.edu. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis, and interested students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. For questions, please contact Emily Lewis, the Administrative Director of the Shareholder Rights Program at  emlewis at law.harvard.edu. Course Description: http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/cur… Clinic description: http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/cur… Program Website: http://srp.law.harvard.edu/

Shareholder Rights Project Openings

Are you planning on working in corporate law? Interested in getting clinical experience working on corporate law and corporate governance matters? The Shareholder Rights Project is seeking participants for its 2013-2014 clinical program. The Shareholder Rights program, taught by Professor Lucian Bebchuk and Scott Hirst, provides students with the opportunity to obtain hands-on experience with shareholder rights work. The SRP works on behalf of public pension funds and charitable organizations seeking to improve corporate governance at publicly traded companies in which they are shareowners, as well as on research and policy projects related to corporate governance. Enrollment requires an application process and is open to Harvard Law School 2L, 3L and LLM students who have taken Corporations or are taking Corporations in the Fall term. LLM students with prior corporate experience may speak with the instructor about waiving this requirement. To apply, students must submit a statement of interest (maximum 200 words), a resume, an academic transcript (unofficial or official), and can elect to submit a writing sample of no more than 15 pages (one sample only). Applications should be addressed to the instructors and submitted to Emily Lewis at  emlewis at law.harvard.edu. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis, and interested students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. For questions, please contact Emily Lewis, the Administrative Director of the Shareholder Rights Program at  emlewis at law.harvard.edu. Course Description: http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/cur… Clinic description: http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/cur… Program Website: http://srp.law.harvard.edu/

Shareholder Rights Project Openings

Are you planning on working in corporate law? Interested in getting clinical experience working on corporate law and corporate governance matters? The Shareholder Rights Project is seeking participants for its 2013-2014 clinical program. The Shareholder Rights program, taught by Professor Lucian Bebchuk and Scott Hirst, provides students with the opportunity to obtain hands-on experience with shareholder rights work. The SRP works on behalf of public pension funds and charitable organizations seeking to improve corporate governance at publicly traded companies in which they are shareowners, as well as on research and policy projects related to corporate governance. Enrollment requires an application process and is open to Harvard Law School 2L, 3L and LLM students who have taken Corporations or are taking Corporations in the Fall term. LLM students with prior corporate experience may speak with the instructor about waiving this requirement. To apply, students must submit a statement of interest (maximum 200 words), a resume, an academic transcript (unofficial or official), and can elect to submit a writing sample of no more than 15 pages (one sample only). Applications should be addressed to the instructors and submitted to Emily Lewis at  emlewis at law.harvard.edu. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis, and interested students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. For questions, please contact Emily Lewis, the Administrative Director of the Shareholder Rights Program at  emlewis at law.harvard.edu. Course Description: http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/cur… Clinic description: http://www.law.harvard.edu/academics/cur… Program Website: http://srp.law.harvard.edu/

Independent Clinical Opportunity

Are you interested in counterterrorism policy and prosecution and related national security matters? This is to inform you of an opportunity for HLS students to perform research and analytical work with the Counterterrorism Section (CTS) and the Office of Law and Policy (OL&P), of the National Security Division of the Department of Justice as an independent clinical project, with Professors Heymann and Rosenberg acting as faculty sponsors. The program has been offered for the past ten years, and the terms for continuing it next year will be concluded in an updated Memorandum of Understanding between the faculty sponsors and with the principals at the DOJ. As in the past, next year’s program will require students to perform clinical work during the Fall and Spring semesters. In addition, in the unlikely event an emergency project arises, students may be called upon to work during the Winter term (but only if such work does not conflict with the students’ normal Winter Term course obligations). Admission into the program is selective; to maximize the education value of challenging work and close supervision, enrollment will be limited to no more than five students. Selection will be based on a student’s academic performance, relevant experience, professional recommendations, and interest in the subject matter. All admitted students must also satisfy the security clearance requirements for the Department of Justice Volunteer Internship Program, sign a confidentiality agreement, and attend a mandatory orientation session in Cambridge at the beginning of the Fall semester. Clinical credits are awarded through the independent clinical work program. Grading is Credit/Fail. Two clinical credits may be awarded (1 Fall credit + 1 Spring credit) and will be recorded on students’ transcripts at the end of the Spring semester. Due to the highly confidential nature of this program, students have the following independent clinical requirements waived: final paper and weekly emails. Standard clinical conditions preclude enrollees in the program from taking any other clinical course during the period of enrollment. You may obtain further information about the HLS-CTS Independent Clinical offering by reading the finalized Memorandum of Understanding outlining the terms for next year’s program. To apply, simply submit your most recent grade sheet and resume to Kim Peterson ( kpeterso at law.harvard.edu), Assistant to David Rosenberg, on or before 4 p.m. on July 12, 2013. This clinical program offers an extraordinary opportunity for both public service (including satisfying the pro bono requirement) and professional training.