Public Speaking Class: The Arts of Communication Class at Fletcher

If you are interested in public speaking, the Fletcher school is offering a compelling “Arts of Communication” module (half semester) course. The course meets beginning this week until December 9, Tuesday and Thursdays at 12:30 – 1:45. Many previous HLS students have taken the course and enjoyed it tremendously.

If you are interested, please immediately email Professor Mihir Mankad, mihir.mankad@tufts.edu. Description of the course is below. The Arts of Communication: Today’s leaders must have the ability not only to analyze thoughtfully but also to communicate clearly and persuasively. This full semester course is intended to turn you into a significantly more persuasive and effective public speaker―someone who speaks with the ease, confidence, clarity, and modes of persuasion that are critical in today’s corporate, nonprofit, policy, and diplomacy worlds. We will cover a range of speaking scenarios, from podium speeches on values to simulations of a press conference or media interview on camera.

The course is intended to help you develop your own personal style by deepening your understanding of the persuasive tools, recommendations, refutations, modes of analysis, and variations in audiences that motivate listeners to turn business, policy and diplomacy ideas into action. 

Spring Seminar on Rhetoric and Public Discourse

Professor Zitrrain’s Spring 2015 seminar on Rhetoric and Public Discourse is accepting applications! This seminar will cover issues in both individual and public discourse. For the former, students will have an opportunity to hone rhetorical skills in a chosen format — speaking, presenting, moderating or production of media — and for the latter, we will explore the evolving nature of discourse in the networked public sphere, from “electronic town halls” to Wikipedia to anonymous and identified commenting.

Some of our questions: What roles do and should intermediaries play in setting our topical agendas and shaping conversations around them? What impact does and can money have in influencing opinion on a large scale? What new modalities exist to facilitate conversation and closure among parties who disagree in good faith? Should advocates and agents be treated the same as those who claim to be speaking for themselves? Are there ways to identify and mitigate discourse grounded in bad faith, a.k.a. truthiness? By application. Possible to fulfill the Written Work Requirement.

The seminar is 2 credits, and will meet from 5:00-7:00 p.m. on Tuesdays. The application can be found at http://brk.mn/rhetoric , and is due at 11:59 p.m. on Friday, October 10, 2014. Subject Areas: Legal & Political Theory . 

Professor Zittrain’s January Cyberlaw Course at Stanford

Want to spend January studying cyberlaw at Stanford? Apply for Professor Zittrain’s Internet & Society course! The course offers an intensive introduction to the field of cyberlaw. It will investigate the evolving nature of online architecture and activities, and the ways in which the legal toolbox has been, and will be, leveraged to influence them. No prerequisites.

Please note: The course will run from Sunday, January 4, 2015 to Friday, January 16, 2015 at Stanford Law School. It will comprise 10 students from Stanford Law School and 10 students from Harvard Law School, including any cross-registrants from other Stanford or Harvard schools. Harvard students will receive funds to assist with travel and accommodations.

The application can be found at http://brk.mn/InternetandSociety, and is due at 11:59 p.m. on Friday, October 10, 2014. The full course listing can be found at http://hls.harvard.edu/academics/curriculum/catalog/index.html?o=67860 

Learn to teach copyright: be a Teaching Fellow for CopyrightX this spring

If you want to be a Teaching Fellow for CopyrightX during Spring 2015, sign up for the spring course Teaching Copyright. CopyrightX (http://copyx.org) is an online course on copyright taught by Professor Terry Fisher. Serving as a CopyrightX TF is an excellent opportunity to engage more deeply with copyright and gain teaching experience.

Teaching Fellows will receive three credits (two classroom credits & one writing credit) through the course Teaching Copyright, also taught by Professor Fisher in Spring 2015. There is a brown-bag info session on Oct. 6 from 12-1 in WCC 3018. See: http://brk.mn/gk. Contact Ana Enriquez for details. 

Teaching 2 sections of SOW34 Caribbean Societies

Societies of the World 34. The Caribbean: Globalization, Socio-Economic Development & Cultural Adaptation Catalog Number: 6357 Orlando Patterson (Sociology) Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 15

Caribbean societies are largely the economic and political creations of Western imperial powers and are among the earliest products of globalization. Though in the West, they are only partly of it, and their popular cultures are highly original blends of African, European and Asian forms. The course examines the area as a system emerging through genocide, piracy, plantation slavery, colonialism and globalization, from a situation of great social and cultural diversity to the present tendency toward socio-economic and cultural convergence. Patterns of underdevelopment and government are explored through national case studies (Puerto Rico, Cuba, Jamaica & Haiti) and selected, region-wide modern issues (hurricanes, earthquakes and other natural disasters; migration & transnationalism; crime & drug trafficking), as are cultural adaptations through studies of Afro-Caribbean religions, folkways, and music. America’s special role in the region is emphasized.

Note: This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past. APPLICATION PROCESS Email Professor Patterson opatters@fas.harvard.edu and cc: Ethan Fosse efosse@fas.harvard.edu Indicating your year in your program, and 2 or 3 sentences why you are qualified to teach this course. 

CopyrightX seeks teaching fellows for 2015

CopyrightX, an online course on copyright taught by Professor Terry Fisher, is seeking HLS students to serve as Teaching Fellows for its Spring 2015 run. This is an excellent opportunity to engage more deeply with copyright and gain teaching experience. Teaching Fellows will receive three credits (two classroom credits & one writing credit) through the course Teaching Copyright, also taught by Professor Fisher in Spring 2015. Interested students may wish to attend the brown-bag information session, which will take place from 12 to 1 pm on October 6 in WCC 3018. Please contact Ana Enriquez (aenriquez@cyber.law.harvard.edu) with any questions. 

Newly posted course with Professor Scott Brewer (HLS) and Professor Edward Hall (Philosophy Department)

This is a newly posted course available for cross-registration by HLS students, and has its first meeting tomorrow, Tuesday September 2 (on the schedule of the Harvard University School of Arts and Sciences). It meets in the Philosophy Department building , in Harvard Yard, in the Tanner Room (Emerson Hall, 310): Philosophy 253: The Epistemic Authority of Science (Graduate Seminar in General Education) Harvard College/GSAS: 44411 Fall 2014-2015 Edward J. Hall and Scott Brewer (Law School) Meeting Time: Tu., 2-4 Exam Group: 14 A systematic examination of the nature and significance of the epistemic authority that our culture currently bequeaths upon science, with emphasis on issues in both the public and private spheres. How, in a democratic society, should scientific expertise be adjudicated, and deployed in decision-making in political and legal settings? To what extent are science and religion in conflict? What is it to adopt a “scientific worldview” – and what difference should this make, if any, to how an individual perceives and conducts her own life? Note: The seminar will design and develop a General Education course on these themes for undergraduates. 2014-2015 Course and Schedule Updates

New course posted with Professor Scott Brewer (HLS) and Professor Edward Hall (Philosophy Department)

This is a newly posted course available for cross-registration by HLS students, and has its first meeting tomorrow, Tuesday September 2 (on the schedule of the Harvard University School of Arts and Sciences). It meets in the Philosophy Department building , in Harvard Yard, in the Tanner Room (Emerson Hall, 310): Philosophy 253: The Epistemic Authority of Science (Graduate Seminar in General Education) Harvard College/GSAS: 44411 Fall 2014-2015 Edward J. Hall and Scott Brewer (Law School) Meeting Time: Tu., 2-4 Exam Group: 14 A systematic examination of the nature and significance of the epistemic authority that our culture currently bequeaths upon science, with emphasis on issues in both the public and private spheres. How, in a democratic society, should scientific expertise be adjudicated, and deployed in decision-making in political and legal settings? To what extent are science and religion in conflict? What is it to adopt a “scientific worldview” – and what difference should this make, if any, to how an individual perceives and conducts her own life? Note: The seminar will design and develop a General Education course on these themes for undergraduates. 

New course cross listed by Professor Scott Brewer (HLS) and Professor Ned Hall (Philosophy Department)

Philosophy 253: The Epistemic Authority of Science (Graduate Seminar in General Education) Harvard College/GSAS: 44411 Fall 2014-2015 Edward J. Hall and Scott Brewer (Law School) Meeting Time: Tu., 2-4 Exam Group: 14 A systematic examination of the nature and significance of the epistemic authority that our culture currently bequeaths upon science, with emphasis on issues in both the public and private spheres. How, in a democratic society, should scientific expertise be adjudicated, and deployed in decision-making in political and legal settings? To what extent are science and religion in conflict? What is it to adopt a “scientific worldview” – and what difference should this make, if any, to how an individual perceives and conducts her own life? Note: The seminar will design and develop a General Education course on these themes for undergraduates. This is a newly-posted course available for cross-registration by HLS students and has its first meeting tomorrow, Tuesday September 2 (on the schedule of the Harvard University School of Arts and Sciences). We’ll meet in the Tanner Room (Emerson Hall, 310). 

Sex Equality course and Gender Crimes seminar

Given the intensive schedule of Sex Equality, all students considering taking the course are STRONGLY URGED to attend the first class September 8, 1:00-4:00, in Pound 101. Professor MacKinnon will be on leave in Fall, 2015. This message may be of special interest to students waitlisted for Professor MacKinnon’s seminar, Evolution of Gender Crimes, which is oversubscribed. 

Contracts/Section 7- First assignment and other information

The books for the course are Steven J. Burton, “Principles of Contract Law,” (Fourth Edition – 2012) and Steven J. Burton, “Contract Law: Selected Source Materials/Annotated” (2014 Edition). Hard copies of the syllabus will be available the first day of class on Tuesday, September 2nd. Please check the course ISite prior to class as well. For our first class on September 2, please prepare pages 1-8 in the first of these books. I would appreciate it if you did not bring laptops (or other electronic devices) to Contracts class this semester. 

Fall 2014 Alford RG CHINA AND THE WORLD: please email in order to add the course

Students interested in taking the Fall 2014 Reading Group with Prof. Alford “CHINA AND THE WORLD” (Thursdays 7-9 pm) please email alford@law and johnson@law before July 30 for permission to add the class. Please see below.

Prerequisite: Admission to the course is by permission of the instructor, with the goal being to achieve a balance of students from different backgrounds. Please email your CV and a two paragraph statement of interest to Professor Alford alford@law.harvard.edu and copy his assistant, Emma Johnson, johnson@law.harvard.edu by July 30 at the latest and preferably sooner. IF YOU HAVE ALREADY EMAILED, YOU WILL BE NOTIFIED SOON. http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k105179&pageid=icb.page680615

China and the World
This Reading Group will examine the role that China has been playing in a world order in flux. Models of development, trade, and rights are among the areas likely to be addressed. We will consider, inter alia, Chinas engagement of existing global norms, ways in which China may (or may not) now or in the foreseeable future be shaping such norms, and their impact on China. The intention is to hold some of our likely 6 2-hour sessions of the Reading Group jointly with a comparable class at Renmin University of China, via electronic means – hence, our evening meeting times. The class will meet 6 times during the fall.

Mandatory Fall 2014 Trial Advocacy Workshop Meeting

There will be a mandatory meeting on Wednesday, April 16, 2014, from 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. in Ames Courtroom (Austin Hall) for all students who have registered for the Fall 2014 Trial Advocacy Workshop.

Any students interested in learning about this course or possibly enrolling in the future are also welcome to attend.

At the meeting, Professor Charles J. Ogletree, Jr. will discuss what you need to do to be prepared for Fall TAW. If you have any questions, please contact Amy E. Soto of the HLS Criminal Justice Institute at  asoto at law.harvard.edu.