Bankruptcy Court Disagrees with Second Circuit’s Holding in Tribune

By Lee Harrington of Nixon Peabody.

Recently, in In re Physiotherapy Holdings Inc., the Bankruptcy Court in Delaware held that section 546(e) of the Bankruptcy Code did not preempt various state fraudulent transfer actions because the allegedly fraudulent transfers implicated neither the rationale for that section nor preemption generally. The decision is at odds with recent case law, notably: (i) the Tribune litigation, in which the Second Circuit concluded that state law constructive fraudulent transfer claims involving payments in LBO transactions are prohibited under section 546(e); and (ii) a proceeding in which the Southern District of New York concluded that the interest payment at issue, which did not retire the underlying debt, were not “settlement payments” and was thus outside section 546(e).

Section 546(e) precludes certain bankruptcy avoidance actions involving settlement payments made by or to a financial institution and transfers made by or to a financial institution in connection with a securities contract. It is intended to prevent litigation that might have a destabilizing “ripple effect” on the financial markets and provides a defense to constructive fraudulent transfer actions against shareholders receiving LBO payments.

Physiotherapy found that section 546(e) was not intended to shield “LBO payments to stockholders at the very end of the asset transfer chain, where the stockholders are the ultimate beneficiaries of the constructively fraudulent transfers, and can give the money back . . . with no damage to anyone but themselves” without the attendant destabilizing “ripple effect.”

The full memo is available here.

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The Bankruptcy Roundtable has previously covered treatment of 546(e), most recently in our Tribune Fraudulent Conveyance Litigation Roundup.

Bankruptcy’s Quiet Revolution

posted in: Cramdown and Priority | 0

Douglas G. Baird, University of Chicago School of Law

 

Over the last few years, reorganization practice has undergone a massive change. A new device—the restructuring support agreement—has transformed Chapter 11 negotiations. This puts reorganization law at a crossroads. Chapter 11’s commitment to a nonmarket restructuring with a rigid priority system requires bankruptcy judges to police bargaining in bankruptcy, but the Bankruptcy Code gives relatively little explicit guidance about how they should do this policing.

In the past, the debtor initiated multiple rounds of negotiations in which everyone participated. Each party would push back against the claims of the other, and a consensus eventually emerged that left things roughly in equipoise. This has now changed. Instead of bargaining in which everyone participates, there is now a sequence of two-party bargains, beginning with the key players.

Changing the structure of negotiations in this fashion would not matter much if there were not much to bargain over. If bankruptcy’s substantive rules allowed for little variation in what each party received or if the debtor had an incentive to limit what each creditor group received, changing the rules would not change outcomes. But neither is the case, at least not any more.

Priority rights in bankruptcy are sufficiently uncertain that there are a broad range of confirmable plans in any case, each with radically different distributional consequences for the various creditor groups. And modern debtors are interested in a speedy and successful exit from Chapter 11. They are relatively indifferent to how rights in the firm are divided among competing creditors.

These changes have become manifest only in the last few years, and there is little wisdom about how the bankruptcy judge should respond. This essay suggests that long-established principles inform how bankruptcy judges should go about this task. In assessing whether a plan is “fair and equitable” and whether it has been filed in “good faith,” judges should focus not on how the plan apportions rights in the reorganized firm, but whether the process that has led to the plan ensures that everyone’s cards are on the table.

In particular, judges should ensure that restructuring support agreements do not interfere with the flow of information to the judge. Negotiations that lead to a confirmable plan should be problematic to the extent, but only to the extent, that they keep the judge in the dark and limit her ability to ensure that the plan complies with the terms of the Bankruptcy Code.

Click here to view the full article.

Earnings Management and Firm Value in Chapter 11

posted in: Valuation | 0

Timothy C.G. Fisher, University of Sydney

Ilanit Gavious, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Jocelyn Martel, ESSEC Business School & THEMA

 

Earnings management occurs when managers deliberately manipulate the company’s earnings either to mislead stakeholders about the underlying economic performance of the company or to influence contractual outcomes. We study the impact of earnings management prior to bankruptcy filing on the passage of firms through Chapter 11.

Using the UCLA-LoPucki Bankruptcy Research Database, we merge a sample of 261 U.S. public firms that filed for Chapter 11 between 1995 and 2009 with firm-level financial information. We construct three measures of earnings management, two of which are accounting (accrual) manipulation measures (discretionary accruals and abnormal working capital accruals) and one a real activities manipulation measure (abnormal operating cash flows).

We find that upward earnings management (more positive or less negative abnormal accruals/operating cash flows) prior to filing significantly reduces the likelihood of confirmation, while downward earnings management significantly increases the likelihood of confirmation. We also find that the likelihood of emerging from Chapter 11 is significantly lower with upward earnings management. The impacts on confirmation and emergence are primarily due to the influence of earnings management values that are one- and two-standard deviations above or below the mean. Thus, our findings are consistent with creditors rewarding unduly conservative earnings reports while punishing overly optimistic earnings reports. We also find that auditor choice (Big 4 vs. non-Big 4) directly affects the probability of confirmation and of emergence from bankruptcy.

Overall, we find that upward management of earnings destroys economic value by making the survival of the firm less likely, an effect that has not previously been uncovered in the literature.

To access the full article, please click here.

Bankruptcy Resolution and the Restoration of Priority of Claims

posted in: Cramdown and Priority | 0

Vedran Capkun, Associate Professor, Accounting and Management Control, HEC Paris

Lawrence Weiss, Professor of International Accounting, The Fletcher School, Tufts University

We present new evidence on the violation of priority of claims in bankruptcy and recovery rates for secured creditors, unsecured creditors, equity holders using a sample of firms that filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy between 1993 and 2004. Our study reveals a number of new insights: First, we find a significant reduction in the violations of priority of claims compared to research on prior periods, with equity holders appearing to have lost their ability to extract concessions in violation to priority of claims. Second, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that unsecured creditors accept a violation to priority of their claims in order to obtain a faster resolution. Third, the results suggest that secured creditors are less likely, and unsecured creditors are more likely, to experience a violation to priority of their claims when secured creditors exercise increased control over the debtor (as proxied by debtor in possession financing). Finally, violations to secured creditors’ priority of claims are more likely when filings occur in Delaware and the Southern District of New York than elsewhere.

 

The full article is available here.