When Do Laws and Institutions Affect Recovery Rates on Collateral?

By Hans Degryse, Vasso Ioannidou, Jose Maria Liberti, and Jason Sturgess

The effect of bankruptcy laws and institutions governing enforcement on firm borrowing, investment, and growth has been studied extensively in the economics and finance literature using mainly country-level data. Due to the lack of micro-level data, the same literature has been silent on the underlying economic channels through which weak laws and institutions affect debt contracting.

In order to fill this gap, we study how laws and legal institutions that shift bargaining power between creditors and debtors in the event of default affect expected recovery rates on assets pledged as collateral in secured lending transactions. In particular, we study empirically the determinants of expected recovery rates on different types of collateral using a detailed loan-level dataset of secured loans made by a single bank across emerging market countries. We are able to pin-point the actual mechanism through which better law and stronger enforcement of secured loans can translate into lending: the effect of creditor rights and asset types on the bank’s expected recovery rates.  Our results suggest collateral that is movable (machinery, equipment, inventory, and accounts receivable), more asset specific, more susceptible to agency concerns, or faster to depreciate exhibits lower expected recovery rates since they are more vulnerable to laws and institutions.

For the full article, please click here.

Strategies for Purchasing and Selling Assets in Chapter 11

posted in: Cramdown and Priority | 0

By Jacqueline Marcus (Weil, Gotshal & Manges) and Doron Kenter (Robins Kaplan)

Sales of a debtor’s assets pursuant to section 363 of the Bankruptcy Code carry significant benefits for buyers and sellers alike. But pursuing a sale process with the overlay of the Bankruptcy Code can also pose challenges and pitfalls, particularly for participants who are unfamiliar with the intricacies of the bankruptcy process and the applicable statutes, rules, and procedures inherent in 363 sales.

Jacqueline Marcus, a partner with Weil, Gotshal & Manges, LLP, and Doron Kenter, Counsel with Robins Kaplan LLP, recently authored an article for Practical Law Bankruptcy, in which they outline the relative advantages and disadvantages of sales in bankruptcy, from both the buyer’s and the seller’s perspective, and offer a practical guide to participating in section 363 sales. The article discusses the various types of section 363 sales, as well as the forms of sale processes that debtors may choose to employ in selling some or substantially all of their assets.  The article discusses the benefits and drawbacks of finding, or being, a stalking horse bidder, and provides guidance for the marketing process, credit bidding, conducting auctions, and choosing a winning bid. It then discusses the competing views regarding the circumstances under which the bankruptcy court may call the debtor’s decision into question or reopen an auction that has otherwise been closed. Finally, the article discusses the considerations that should be taken into account in determining an exit strategy after a debtor completes a sale of substantially all of its assets.

The full text of the article is available here.

Bankruptcy Sales

posted in: Cramdown and Priority | 0

By Melissa B. Jacoby (University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill) and Edward J. Janger (Brooklyn Law School)

Bankruptcy courts have become fora for the sale of entire firms as going concerns, as well as for the liquidation of assets piecemeal. This book chapter teases out the advantages and disadvantages of conducting such sales under federal bankruptcy law as compared to state law. We first describe the forms that bankruptcy sales can take, and the contexts in which they occur. Next, we explore the concept of “bankruptcy created value,” identifying the ways in which the federal bankruptcy process can create value over and above what can be realized through compulsory state processes. We then identify several procedural and governance-based concerns about all-asset sales. We suggest that our recent proposal, the Ice Cube Bond, might address concerns about sales of substantially all assets by withholding a portion of the sale proceeds. To recover the withheld funds, claimants would have to establish that the sale did not harm the bankruptcy estate and that they would be legally entitled to the funds under the normal bankruptcy priority rules or pursuant to an agreement reached after the sale. To conclude, we explore the related issues of credit bidding and the permissible scope of sale orders that declare assets to be “free and clear” of various kinds of claims and property interests.

The full chapter may be found here.

This draft chapter has been accepted for publication by Edward Elgar Publishing in the forthcoming Corporate Bankruptcy Handbook, edited by Barry Adler, due to be published in 2017.

The Future of Solvency and Adequate Capitalization Analysis

posted in: Valuation | 0

By Michael Simkovic, Seton Hall University School of Law

Valuation, solvency, and adequate capitalization analyses play a crucial role in corporate reorganization. Courts and bankruptcy professionals have often complained about the expense, delay, subjectivity, and unpredictability inherent in traditional approaches to valuation.

However, newer methods based on market prices for equity, debt, or options and derivatives are supplementing, and in some cases supplanting more established approaches. One proposal is that instead of looking to bond or equity prices, courts should look to credit spreads between corporate and treasury bonds. Because investors could eliminate almost all credit risk by selling a corporate bond and purchasing a treasury bond, the difference in yield between a corporate bond and a treasury bond must compensate investors for the additional risks of non-payment of corporate bonds.

Credit spreads offer a clear indicator of market actors’ expectations about the likelihood of default and the likely losses given default. With a single assumption about recovery rates—which can be grounded in historic data or sometimes backed out from contemporaneous market data—one can reconstruct a daily market estimate of a debtors’ probability of default.

Credit-spread based approaches are faster, less expensive, and more objective than current approaches. An example is provided below using data for Caesar’s Entertainment Operating Company:

 

Figure 1. Caesars risk-neutral market-implied probability of default from CDS and bond spreads (preliminary analysis).

 

The traditional financial analysis performed by the Examiner in Caesars required months of work and only looked at a few specific dates. The preliminary market-based analysis above was completed by a law professor in a few days, and indicates capital adequacy on a daily basis.

If market-based approaches to solvency analysis could be used with confidence in many large corporate bankruptcy cases, the collective savings to debtors’ estates over a decade could easily be in the tens of millions of dollars.

 

Did Bankruptcy Reform Contribute to the Rise in Structured Finance?

By Kandarp Srinivasan

Financial contracts such as repurchase agreements (“repos”) have effective “super-priority” in a bankruptcy situation—they are safe harbored from the automatic stay provision. The common justification for this special treatment is the threat of cascade effects (systemic risk). The 2005 Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act (“BAPCPA”) expanded safe harbor provisions for repos collateralized by mortgage-related securities.

This paper highlights an unintended consequence of preferential treatment: Safe harbor exemptions increased incentives for financial institutions to issue complex securitized products. From an economic standpoint, an increase in demand for collateral in repo markets can cause securitized products to become more attractive to issue (Gorton and Metrick (2012)). This theoretical premise has remained untested so far.

Using data from bank holding companies and underwriters of structured mortgage products, this paper finds an increase in mortgage securitization activity in years preceding the financial crisis. Hand-collected data on repo collateral in the tri-party repo market reveals underwriters of securitized products increased use of mortgage-backed repos in the quarters following the law change.

Understanding the securitization “flash flood” is important because regulatory responses during the financial crisis (for example, TARP) were primarily targeted at buying securitized assets. Yet, the Dodd-Frank Act directs little attention to repurchase markets (Acharya (2010)). If safe harbor contributed to the proliferation of securitized products, it renews the debate (Roe (2011), Duffie and Skeel (2012)) on the costs and benefits of preferential treatment of financial contracts in bankruptcy.

For the full article, please click here. The Roundtable has posted work on this topic previously. See Morrison, Roe, and Sontchi, “Rolling Back the Repo Safe Harbors.”