The Ninth Circuit Affirms Creditors’ Ability to Block ‘Cramdown’ by Purchasing Claims

By George P. Angelich and Annie Y. Stoops (Arent Fox).

The Ninth Circuit affirmed the creditor’s ability to block “cramdown” by purchasing junior debt for the purpose of protecting its own existing claim.  In re Fagerdala USA-Lompoc, Inc., 891 F.3d 848 (9th Cir. 2018).  In reversing the bankruptcy court’s decision to designate claims for bad faith under 11 U.S.C. § 1126(e), the Ninth Circuit held that the creditor acting in its self-interest by purchasing unsecured claims to block “cramdown” did not constitute bad faith unless evidence showed the creditor acted with a motive ulterior to the purpose of protecting its economic interest in a bankruptcy proceeding.  Examples of “ulterior motive” included a creditor purchasing claims for the purpose of blocking litigation against it or a debtor arranging to have an insider purchase claims.

Fagerdala clarifies that creditors may purchase claims in defense of their economic interests in bankruptcy proceedings.  In holding that the bad faith inquiry under 11 U.S.C.  § 1126(e) requires evidence of an “ulterior motive,” the Ninth Circuit sets the stage for designation where a non-creditor or strategic investor purchases claims as an offensive move to gain an advantage over the Chapter 11 debtor.

The full article is available here.

A New Risk to Bankruptcy Sales – Unwinding of the Sale Due to a Bad Faith Filing

posted in: Valuation | 0

Authors: Lenard M. Parkins and Karl D. Burrer of Haynes and Boone, LLP

Parkins_Lenny HeadshotBurrer_Karl headshotRecently, the Eleventh Circuit rendered its decision in the Wortley v. Chrispus Venture Capital, LLC case unwinding a four-year old sale order based on a finding that the underlying bankruptcy case was filed in bad faith. The decision injects a new risk for buyers of distressed assets – the potential reversal of a sale order years after the closing of the transaction.

While the Wortley opinion clearly provides that a finding of “bad faith” with respect to the filing of a bankruptcy case can result in its dismissal (even) years later, it is unclear whether the holding requires the unwinding of all sales that transpired prior to dismissal of a bankruptcy case subsequently deemed to have been filed in bad faith. As a general matter, a dismissal for a bad-faith filing is a matter of court discretion under section 1112(b) – not a matter of jurisdiction.  Further, section 349 seems to provide that dismissals are not per se intended to unwind sales to good faith purchasers in a bankruptcy case. Accordingly, it can be argued that the Wortley holding should be limited to circumstances in which the purchaser is also the party found to have unclean hands with respect to the debtor’s bankruptcy filing.  Notwithstanding this analysis, the decision will require a new (and potentially amorphous) aspect of diligence for bankruptcy purchasers: the original motivation for the bankruptcy filing.

See here for a more detailed discussion of the Wortley decision.