Call For Abstracts! Beyond Disadvantage: Disability, Law, and Bioethics – PFC’s 2018 Annual Conference

“Congress acknowledged that society’s accumulated myths and fears about disability and disease are as handicapping as are the physical limitations that flow from actual impairment.” Justice William J. Brennan, Jr., School Bd. of Nassau, Fl. v. Arline, 480 U.S. 273 (1973).

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is pleased to announce plans for our 2018 annual conference, entitled: “Beyond Disadvantage: Disability, Law, and Bioethics.” This year’s conference is organized in collaboration with the Harvard Law School Project on Disability.

Conference Description

disability-law-bioethics_slideHistorically and across societies people with disabilities have been stigmatized and excluded from social opportunities on a variety of culturally specific grounds. These justifications include assertions that people with disabilities are biologically defective, less than capable, costly, suffering, or fundamentally inappropriate for social inclusion. Rethinking the idea of disability so as to detach being disabled from inescapable disadvantage has been considered a key to twenty-first century reconstruction of how disablement is best understood. Continue reading

OK, Now What? Health Care Reform Next Steps

By Carmel Shachar

The latest push to repeal at least some aspects of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) died late into Thursday, July 27, 2017 when John McCain (R-AZ) joined Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) and Susan Collins (R-ME) to vote against a much stripped down repeal bill.  This dramatic moment has been replayed over and over again by health policy wonks and on cable TV.  However, now that we have all “watched the show” a pressing question is unavoidable: What happens next?

Next Steps for Congress

The failure to pass repeal and replace (in the form of the Better Care Reconciliation Act), complete repeal (in a variation of the Obamacare Repeal Reconciliation Act), or skinny repeal (in the form of the Health Care Freedom Act), suggests that Congress may have to resort to something previously considered unthinkable: bipartisan action.  Indeed, soon after Senate Republicans failed to pass a health care bill, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer (R-NY), stated that “[o]n health care, I hope we can work together to make the system better in a bipartisan way.” Continue reading