TODAY, 4/17 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Judith Daar

April 17, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “A Clash at the Petri Dish: Transferring Embryos with Known Genetic Anomalies”

Judith Daar is Professor of Law at Whittier Law School with a joint appointment at the UCI School of Medicine. She focuses her teaching and scholarship at the intersection of law, medicine and ethics. Her interdisciplinary work in law and medicine focuses in the area of reproductive medicine, where she holds leadership positions including Chair of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Ethics Committee. In 2005, Professor Daar became Chair of the Association of American Law School’s Section on Law, Medicine and Health Care, and in 2006 she was named to the Board of Directors of the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics. She was elected President of ASLME in 2009 and re-elected for a second term in 2010. In 2007, she was appointed to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technologies, Committee on Informed Consent in ART, an interdisciplinary group of physicians and attorneys charged with drafting a model informed consent document for patients undergoing in vitro fertilization. From 2008 to 2012, Professor Daar served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. In 2012, she was elected to the American Law Institute.

Professor Daar is a member of the UCI Medical Center Medical Ethics Committee, where she serves on the Bioethics Consultation Team. She has also served as a member of the Harbor-UCLA Hospital Institutional Review Board, and the ABACoordinating Group on Bioethics. Professor Daar has lectured extensively in the field of reproductive medicine, including giving testimony to the California legislature and the National Academies of Science, Committee on Science, Technology, and Law on the issue of oversight and regulation of reproductive medicine. Her scholarship focuses in the area of assisted reproductive technologies where she has authored over one hundred articles, book chapters, editorials and white papers on topics including stem cell research, human cloning, frozen embryo disputes, the use of genetic technologies and the regulation of reproductive medicine. Her first book, Reproductive Technologies and the Law, was published in January 2006, with a second edition appearing in 2013. Her most recent book, The New Eugenics: Selective Breeding in an Era of Reproductive Technologies, will be published by Yale University Press.

TODAY, 4/10 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Leo Beletsky

April 10, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the presentation: “America’s Favorite Antidote: Murder-By-Overdose in the Age of the Opioid Epidemic”

Leo Beletsky is Associate Professor of Law and Health Sciences with a joint appointment with the School of Law and Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University. His expertise is on the use of law to advance public health. He utilizes empirical and theoretical approaches to analyze how legal mechanisms can help curb substance abuse, prevent the spread of HIV and other infectious diseases, and improve patient care. By highlighting discrepancies between black letter law and its real-world implementation, he also examines the relationship between police practices, public health outcomes, and human rights of vulnerable groups. Professor Beletsky communicates this work to legal, scientific and mainstream audiences, including as a contributor to The Huffington Post.

Throughout his career, Beletsky has applied his skills and expertise in service to governmental agencies and non-governmental organizations, including UNAIDS, US Department of Justice, the City of New York and the Open Society Foundations. This involvement has focused on legal reform and programmatic efforts to better align law and policing with community health. His commitment to translating lessons learned between domestic and international settings has informed a portfolio of projects across the Americas (US and Mexico), Central and East Asia (China, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan) and Eastern Europe (Russia and Ukraine).

Prior to joining the Northeastern community, Professor Beletsky was on the faculty of the Division of Global Public Health at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, where he retains an adjunct appointment. He received his undergraduate training in geography from Vassar College and Oxford University, a master’s in public health from Brown University, his law degree from Temple University School of Law, and his post-doctoral training at the Yale University Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. He is a member of the New York State Bar.

TODAY, 3/27 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Kathryn Zeiler

March 27, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Communication-And-Resolution Programs: The Numbers Don’t Add Up”

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.

Kathryn Zeiler is Professor of Law and Nancy Barton Scholar at the BU School of Law. Prior to joining the BU faculty, Zeiler was Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center (2003–2015). She has held visiting professorships at Harvard Law School, NYU School of Law, and Boston University School of Law. In Fall 2010 she was a Senior Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center.

Zeiler’s scholarship applies economic theory and empirical methods to the study of legal issues and research questions. Her main scholarly interests include the importation of experimental economics results and behavioral economics theories into legal scholarship, the impact of state legislative tort damages caps on the price of medical malpractice insurance premiums, the impacts of communication and resolution programs implemented by hospitals to resolve medical malpractice claims, and the role of medical malpractice insurers in patient safety.

Zeiler serves as a fellow and member of the board for the Society of Empirical Legal Studies (2015–present). She currently holds positions on the editorial board of the American Law and Economics Review and Behavioral Science and Policy. She is a member of the Max Planck Institute’s Scientific Review Board for Research on Collective Goods. She has served as a member of the board of directors of the American Law and Economics Association (2010–2012). She is a regular peer-reviewer for a number of economics journals and law and economics journals.

Her recent publications include “Against Endowment Theory: Experimental Economics and Legal Scholarship” (UCLA Law Review), “Do Damages Caps Reduce Medical Malpractice Insurance Premiums?: A Systematic Review of Estimates and the Methods Used to Produce Them” (Research Handbook on the Economics of Torts), “The Willingness to Pay-Willingness to Accept Gap, the “Endowment Effect,” Subject Misconceptions, and Experimental Procedures for Eliciting Valuations: Reply” (American Economic Review), “Cautions on the Use of Economics Experiments in Law” (Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics), and “Medical Malpractice Liability Crisis or Patient Compensation Crisis? (DePaul Law Review, Rising Stars Symposium).

TODAY, 3/6 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Khiara Bridges

March 6, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation

Download the presentation: 

Note from the Presenter:

I am circulating the introductory chapter from my first ethnography, Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization, and a book proposal for my as yet untitled second ethnography.

My first book grew out of eighteen months of ethnographic fieldwork research that I conducted in the obstetrics clinic of a public hospital in New York City. I found myself in the clinic because I was interested in studying race as a process: I wanted to explore how ideas about race are made material on the bodies of poor women during the event of pregnancy. Moreover, I was curious about the role of the law in this process of race-making.

What I did not realize back when I was writing Reproducing Race was that the book would be a prelude to my second ethnography—a book about which I am now beginning to think. This ethnography will extend the analysis began in Reproducing Race to affluent women of color. Reproducing Race revealed that poor, pregnant women of color are treated in ways that are significantly different from the ways in which wealthier pregnant women are treated. But, how much of that different treatment is an effect of race? How much of it is an effect of class? By training its focus on women of color with class privilege, my second ethnography will try to figure it all out. Thus, the central preoccupation that motivates the study is the complex relationship between race and class. How does class privilege alter the experience of race? How does one’s status as a racial minority alter the experience of class privilege?

The second ethnography is very much in its earlier stages. So, any and all feedback on this project is welcome.

About the Presenter

Continue reading

TODAY, 2/13 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Brandon Maher

February 13, 2017 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “Unlocking Exchanges”

Brendan S. Maher is a Professor of Law and the Director of the independently endowed Insurance Law Center at UConn School of Law. A graduate of Stanford University and Harvard Law School, Maher is the faculty advisor for the peer-reviewed Connecticut Insurance Law Journal and a nationally recognized expert in the regulation of insurance, pensions, and health care. He is a leading authority on the meaning of both ERISA and the Affordable Care Act. Maher also teaches and studies the procedural and evidentiary aspects of civil litigation in federal courts.

Maher is an appointed member of the Connecticut Retirement Security Board, a board created by the state legislature to develop a comprehensive proposal for the implementation of a public retirement plan. He is also the co-moderator of Connecticut’s Forum on Healthcare Innovation, a forum for scholars, investors, providers, scientists, and regulators to share ideas on optimizing health outcomes. He was the chairman of the law school’s “The Affordable Care Act Turns Five” conference, where former United States Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius was the keynote speaker.

Maher regularly appears before the United States Supreme Court to litigate cases involving employee benefits, preemption, and procedure. One of his cases, LaRue v. DeWolff, Boberg & Associates, was described by The New York Times as “one of the most important rulings in years on the meaning of the federal pension law known as ERISA.” He also studies and is routinely consulted by states, medical providers, and employee organizations as to the applicability of federal law to their activities.

Maher is licensed to practice in several state and federal courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court.

Monday, 11/28, Health Law Workshop with Frances Kamm

November 28, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation title: “Advanced and End of Life Care: Cautionary Suggestions”

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.

Frances Kamm is the Littauer Professor of Philosophy and Public Policy in the Kennedy School of Government and Professor of Philosophy in the Faculty of Arts & Sciences.

She is the author of Creation and Abortion (1992); Morality, Mortality, Vol. 1: Death and Whom to Save From It (1993); Morality, Mortality, Vol. 2: Rights, Duties, and Status (1996); Intricate Ethics: Rights, Responsibilities, and Permissible Harm (2007), and, most recently, Ethics for Enemies: Terror, Torture, & War (2011). She also has published many articles on normative ethical theory and practical ethics.

Professor Kamm has held ACLS, AAUW, and Guggenheim fellowships, and has been a Fellow of the Program in Ethics and the Professions at the Kennedy School, the Center for Human Values at Princeton, and the Center for Advanced Study at Stanford.

She is a member of the editorial boards of Philosophy & Public AffairsLegal TheoryBioethics, and Utilitas, and was a consultant on ethics to the World Health Organization.

Monday, 11/21, Health Law Workshop with Elizabeth Weeks Leonard

November 21, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the presentation materials: “Healthism:  Health Status Discrimination and the Law”

Elizabeth Weeks Leonard joined the Georgia Law faculty in 2011. She is currently a J. Alton Hosch Professor of Law. Her teaching and research interests include torts, health law, health care financing and regulation, and public health law.

Prior to coming to UGA, Weeks served on the faculty at the University of Kansas School of Law. During her time there, she was honored with the Howard M. and Susan Immel Award for Teaching Excellence and with the Meredith Docking Faculty Scholar Award, a university-wide honor for faculty who have distinguished themselves early in their careers. Additionally, she has served as a visiting professor at the University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law and at Georgia Law. Continue reading

Monday, 11/7, HLS Health Law Workshop with Trudo Lemmens

November 7, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “While Canada Ventures into Legalized Medical Assistance in Dying, What Can It Learn from the Belgian Euthanasia Experience?”

To request a copy of the paper in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich@law.harvard.edu.

Trudo Lemmens is Professor and Scholl Chair in Health Law and Policy at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He holds cross appointments in the Faculty of Medicine, and the Joint Centre for Bioethics. Since joining the Faculty of Law, he has been a member of the School of Social Science of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, a visiting fellow of the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts, a visiting professor at the K.U.Leuven and the University of Otago (New Zealand), a Plumer Visiting Fellow at Oxford’s St. Anne’s College, and an academic visitor at the Faculty of Law and the HeLEX Center for Health, Law and Emerging Technologies at the University of Oxford.

Lemmens holds a Licentiate of Laws (LL.Lic.) from the KU Leuven (Belgium) and both a Master of Laws (LLM, specialization bioethics) and Doctorate of Civil Law (DCL) from McGill University. His research sits at the interface of law, ethics, and professional governance. Currently, his research focuses on the complex interaction between law, other governance tools, and ethical norms and values in the context of health care, biomedical research, health product development, and knowledge production.

Lemmens’ publications include the co-authored book Reading the Future? Legal and Ethical Challenges of Predictive Genetic Testing, the co-edited volume Law and Ethics in Biomedical Research: Regulation, Conflict of Interest, and Liability, as well as numerous chapters and articles in national and international law, policy, science, medicine and bioethics journals. He is currently a member of the Advisory Committee on Health Research of the Pan American Health Organization and of the Board of the Ontario Mental Health Foundation.

Monday, 10/24, HLS Health Law Workshop with Lindsay Wiley

October 24, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Social Norms, Legal Foundations, and Noncommunicable Disease Prevention”

To request a copy of the paper in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich@law.harvard.edu.

Lindsay Wiley is Associate Professor of Law at the Washington College of Law at American University. She teaches torts, health law, and public health law. Her research focuses on access to health care and healthy living conditions in the U.S. and globally. She serves on the Board of Directors of the American Society for Law, Medicine, and Ethics and the National Conference of Lawyers and Scientists. Prior to joining the faculty at WCL, Professor Wiley was the Global Health Law Program Director at the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University. She had also previously worked at the Center for Law and the Public’s Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the American Society for Law, Medicine, and Ethics, and Gordon, Feinblatt, Rothman LLC in Baltimore, MD. She received her AB and JD from Harvard, where she served on the Harvard Law Review, and her MPH from Johns Hopkins.

Monday, 10/17, HLS Health Law Workshop with Nicholson Price

October 17, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Regulating Black-Box Medicine.” To request a copy of the paper in preparation for the workshop, please email Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.

Nicholson Price is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan School of Law, where he teaches Patents, Health Law, and first-year Property, among other courses. He was previously Assistant Professor at the University of New Hampshire School of Law. From 2012 to 2014 Nicholson was an Academic Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center, where he studied innovation in the pharmaceutical industry, personalized medicine, and the issues surrounding secondary findings in genomic research. His work has been published in Science, the Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, Nature Biotechnology, the Boston College Law Review, and the Hastings Center Report, among others.

Nicholson received his JD from Columbia Law School in 2011, where he was a James Kent Scholar, was Submissions Editor of the Columbia Science and Technology Law Review, and twice received the Julius Silver Note Prize. He received his PhD in Biological Sciences, also from Columbia University, in 2010. He holds an AB in Biological Sciences from Harvard College. After law school, he clerked for Judge Carlos T. Bea of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and was a Visiting Consortium Scholar at the UCSF/UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science and Health Policy.

Monday, 9/19, HLS Health Law Workshop with Amy Sepinwall

September 19, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “The Challenges of Conscience in a World of Compromise”

Amy Sepinwall is Assistant Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics and James G. Campbell, Jr. Memorial Term Assistant Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include individual and collective responsibility for corporate and financial wrongdoing, corporate constitutional rights, and gender and racial justice. Prior to joining the faculty at the Wharton School, she clerked for the Honorable Louis H. Pollak, Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

Sepinwall earned her PhD from Georgetown University and her JD from Yale Law School. She also holds MA and BA degrees from McGill University. From 2007 – 2008, she held a Charlotte Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship at the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.

Monday, 9/12, HLS Health Law Workshop with Patricia Zettler

September 12, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: Pharmaceutical Federalism

Patricia J. Zettler is associate professor of law at Georgia State University College of Law. She has expertise in the regulation of medicine, biotechnology and biomedical research, with an emphasis on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Her research focuses on the interaction between state and federal regulation of medicine and science, the challenges that innovation poses for the FDA’s regulatory scheme, and the treatment use of experimental drugs and devices outside of clinical trials. Zettler’s scholarship has appeared or is forthcoming in various legal and medical journals, including the Indiana Law Journal, San Diego Law Review, Yale Journal of Health Policy Law and Ethics, Journal of Law and the Biosciences, Boston University International Law Journal, JAMA Internal Medicine, EMBO Molecular Medicine, and Academic Medicine. Zettler teaches Torts, Health Law: Quality & Access, and Food and Drug Law.

Before joining Georgia State Law in 2015, she was a fellow at the Center for Law and the Biosciences at Stanford Law School. Prior to her fellowship, she served as an associate chief counsel in the FDA’s Office of Chief Counsel, where she advised the FDA and the Department of Health and Human Services on various issues including drug safety, human subjects protection, expanded access to investigational drugs, over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements, prescription drug advertising and promotion, incentives for developing antibiotics and advisory committees. Continue reading

Monday, 4/18, HLS Health Law Workshop with Robert Cook-Deegan

April 18, 2016, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall 105
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138

The materials for the presentation, “Mining the Genomic Data Mountain: Legal and Policy Challenges,” can be downloaded here.

Robert Cook-Deegan is a research professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University, with secondary appointments in Internal Medicine (School of Medicine), and Biology (Trinity College of Arts & Sciences). He was the founding director for Genome Ethics, Law & Policy in Duke’s Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy from July 2002 through December 2012.  He is the author of The Gene Wars: Science, Politics, and the Human Genome and an author on over 250 articles.

Dr. Cook-Deegan’s areas of expertise include genomics and intellectual property, history of genomics, global health, science and health policy, and health research policy. His current research focuses on policy implications of genomics, bioethics, intellectual property, and innovation.

Monday, 4/11, HLS Health Law Workshop with Nathan Cortez

HLS Health Law Workshop: Nathan Cortez

April 11, 2016, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall 105
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138

Download the Presentation: “Regulation by Database”

Nathan Cortez is Associate Dean for Research and Associate Professor in Dedman School of Law at Southern Methodist University. He teaches and writes in the areas of health law, administrative law, and FDA law.  His research focuses on emerging markets in health care and biotechnology. He has become one of the world’s leading legal scholars on medical tourism, patient mobility, and cross-border health insurance.

His research also addresses mobile health technologies, how to regulate innovations that disrupt static regulatory regimes, the First Amendment restraints on FDA regulation (including FDA’s graphic tobacco warnings), immigration federalism, and alternative modes of regulation.

Monday, 4/4, HLS Health Law Workshop with Nicolas Terry

HLS Health Law Workshop: Nicolas Terry

April 4, 2016 5:00 – 7:00 PM
Hauser Hall 105
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138

Download the Presentation: “Regulatory Disruption and Arbitrage in Healthcare Data Protection”

Nicolas P. Terry is the Hall Render Professor of Law at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law. He serves as Executive Director of the Hall Center for Law and Health. Professor Terry teaches Torts, Products Liability, Health Information Technology, Law & Science, and Health Care Quality.

Educated at Kingston University and the University of Cambridge, Professor Terry began his academic career as a member of the law faculty of the University of Exeter in England. He has served as a Senior Fellow at Melbourne Law School and held visiting faculty positions at the law schools of Santa Clara University, the University of Missouri-Columbia, Washington University, and the University of Iowa. From 2000-08, Professor Terry served as co-director of Saint Louis University’s Center for Health Law Studies. From 2008-10, Terry served as the School of Law’s Senior Associate Dean.

Professor Terry’s research interests lie primarily at the intersection of medicine, law, and information technology. He is a permanent blogger at the HealthLawProf Blog and at Harvard Law School’s Bill of Health.  Professor Terry is also is the co-presenter of the “The Week in Health Law” podcast.

Monday, 3/7, HLS Health Law Workshop with Michael Frakes

HLS Health Law Workshop: Michael Frakes

March 7, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall 105
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138

Download the Presentation (two files): “Does Medical Malpractice Law Improve Health Care Quality?” and Appendix

Michael Frakes is an Associate Professor of Law at Northwestern Law. He is also a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Faculty Fellow at Northwestern’s Institute for Policy Research. He was previously an Assistant Professor of Law at Cornell Law School from 2011-2014. From 2009 to 2011, he was anAcademic Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. He is generally interested in empirical research in the areas of health law and innovation policy. His research in health is largely focused on understanding how certain legal and financial incentives affect the decisions of physicians and other health care providers. His research in innovation policy centers around the relationship between the financing of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and key aspects of its decision making. His scholarship has appeared in, or is forthcoming in, the American Economic Review, the Stanford Law Review, the University of Chicago Law Review, the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, the Vanderbilt Law Review, the American Law and Economics Review, and the Journal of Health Economics.

Monday, 2/22, Health Law Workshop with Tom Shakespeare

HLS Health Law Workshop: Tom Shakespeare

February 22, 2016 5:00 PM
Hauser Hall 102
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138

Download the Papers:
“Disability and social rights: Family and intimate relations”
“Nasty, Brutish, and Short? On the Predicament of Disability and Embodiment”

Tom Shakespeare is Senior Lecturer at Norwich Medical School, the University of East Anglia. From his website:

My primary research interests are in disability studies, medical sociology, and in social and ethical aspects of genetics. I have had a long involvement with the disabled people’s movement in UK and internationally. In the context of disability arts, I have also been active in arts and culture, and was a member of Arts Council England from 2003-2008.  While at Newcastle University, I developed an interest in science communication and public engagement, and helped develop the café scientifique movement in UK and across the world, as well as promoting sci-art projects.  During my five years at WHO, I helped produce and launch key reports such as the World Report on Disability (WHO 2011) and International Perspectives on Spinal Cord Injury (WHO 2013), and was responsible for the UN statement on forced, coerced and otherwise involuntary sterilization (WHO 2014).  This grew my interest in disability and international development.

I did my PhD at Cambridge University and then worked at the Universities of Sunderland, Leeds and Newcastle, before spending five years working at the World Health Organization in Geneva.  In February 2013, I started my current post at Norwich Medical School.  I continue to consult for WHO, World Bank and other UN agencies.

1993-1996             Lecturer, University of Sunderland

1996-1999             Research Fellow, University of Leeds

1999-2008             Research Fellow, University of Newcastle, where I co-founded and developed the Policy, Ethics and Life Sciences Research Institute.

2008-2013             Technical officer, Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability, World Health Organization, Geneva.

For more information, visit his website.

Monday, Feb. 1, Health Law Workshop with Michelle Mello

HLS Health Law Workshop: Michelle Mello

February 1, 2016 5:00 – 7:00 PM
Hauser Hall 105
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138

Presentation Title: “Reforming the Medical Liability System in New York: Outcomes of the New York State Medical Liability Reform and Patient Safety Demonstration Project.” To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.

Michelle M. Mello is Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Professor of Health Research and Policy at Stanford School of Medicine. She is a leading empirical health law scholar whose research is focused on understanding the effects of law and regulation on health care delivery and population health outcomes. She holds a joint appointment at the Stanford University School of Medicine in the Department of Health Research and Policy. Continue reading

Monday, 11/23, HLS Health Law Workshop with Amanda Pustilnik

PustilnikHLS Health Law Workshop: Amanda Pustilnik

November 23, 2015, 5:00 PM
Lewis International Law Center, Room 214A
1557 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge MA 02138

Download the paper: “And If Your Friends Jumped Off a Bridge, Would You Do It Too?”: How Developmental Neuroscience Can Inform Regimes Governing Adolescents (co-authored with Michael N. Tennison)

Amanda C. Pustilnik is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Maryland School of Law, where she teaches Criminal Law, Evidence, and Law & Neuroscience. Her current research includes work on models of mind in criminal law, evidentiary issues presented by neuroscientific work on memory, and the role of pain in different legal domains. Prior to joining the University of Maryland, she was a Climenko fellow and lecturer on law at Harvard Law School. Before entering the legal academy, she practiced litigation with Covington & Burling and with Sullivan & Cromwell, where she focused on white collar criminal matters. Prof. Pustilnik also clerked for the Hon. Jose A. Cabranes on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. She graduated Yale Law School and Harvard College, and has been a visiting scholar at the University of Cambridge, Emmanuel College, in the History and Philosophy of Science department. Prof. Pustilnik has also worked at McKinsey & Company as a management consultant and is a member of the board of directors of the John Harvard Scholarships. In 2014-2015, Pustilnik was the inaugural Senior Fellow in Law and Neuroscience at the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at MGH and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

Monday, 11/16, HLS Health Law Workshop with Seema Shah

HLS Health Law Workshop: Seema Shah

November 16, 2015, 5:00 PM
Lewis International Law Center, Room 214A
1557 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge MA 02138

Download the paper: “Uncertainty and the Eighth Amendment”

Seema Shah is a faculty member in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Department of Bioethics and has a joint appointment at the Division of AIDS. Her research focuses on the ethics of international research, the ethics of research with children, and the intersection of law and bioethics. She currently serves as a consultant for the Division of AIDS on its clinical sciences review committee and as an ethics consultant for the Clinical Center.

She earned her bachelor’s and juris doctor degrees from Stanford University. She previously served as a federal law clerk in the Eastern District of California and a predoctoral fellow in the NIH Department of Bioethics.

She has lectured on the ethics of clinical research at conferences run by PRIM&R, ASBH, IAB, ASTMH, and internationally in such locations as Botswana, South Africa, Vietnam, Japan, Indonesia, and Mali.