Don’t miss today’s Health Law Workshop with Christina S. Ho!

October 15, 2018 5:00 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “Health Impact Assessment: A Negative Right to Health”

Professor Christina S. Ho is Professor of Law at Rutgers Law School. She joined the Rutgers faculty in 2010 from the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where she was a Senior Fellow and Project Director of the China Health Law Initiative. She was previously Country Director and senior policy advisor for the Clinton Foundation’s China program. During the Clinton Administration, she worked on the Domestic Policy Council at the White House and later led Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton’s health legislative staff.

Professor Ho received her AB from Harvard College, her MPP from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and her JD from Harvard Law School.

Don’t miss today’s Health Law Workshop with S. Matthew Liao

October 1, 2018 5:00 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “The Moral Status and Rights of Artificial Intelligence”

To request a copy of the paper in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.

S. Matthew Liao is Director of Center for Bioethics and Arthur Zitrin Professor of Bioethics at the NYU College of Global Public Health. He uses the tools of philosophy to study and examine the ramifications of novel biomedical innovations.

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Don’t miss today’s Health Law Workshop with Zack Buck

September 24, 2018 5:00 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “The Price of Universality: Sustainable Access and the Twilight of the ACA”

Zack Buck specializes in health law, and his scholarship examines governmental enforcement of laws affecting health and health care in the United States. Most recently, his writing has sought to evaluate how the enforcement of health care fraud and abuse laws impacts American quality of care, with a particular focus on the legal regulation of overtreatment. Over the last five years, his work has been published in the California Law Review, Boston College Law Review, Ohio State Law Journal, Maryland Law Review, Florida State Law Review, and U.C. Davis Law Review, among others.

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Don’t miss today’s Health Law Workshop with Matthew Lawrence

Matthew J. B. Lawrence is Assistant Professor of Law at Penn State Dickinson Law. From 2013 to 2015 he was an Academic Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center, where his research focused on civil procedure, health law, and administrative law. His scholarship has been published in the New York University Law Review, the University of Cincinnati Law Review, the Fordham Law Review, and the Indiana Law Journal. During his fellowship Matt also designed and taught a class at Harvard Law School entitled “Law and Medicine: The Affordable Care Act,” and spoke widely at conferences and events on health law issues.

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TODAY, 12/4 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with Rachel Sachs

December 4, 2017 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Delinking Reimbursement”

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich@law.harvard.edu.

Rachel E. Sachs is Associate Professor of Law at Washington University School of Law (St. Louis). She is a scholar of innovation policy whose work explores the interaction of intellectual property law, food and drug regulation, and health law. Her work explores problems of innovation and access, considering how law helps or hinders these problems. Professor Sachs’ scholarship has or will have appeared in journals that include the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology, the University of California-Davis Law Review, the Yale Journal of Law & Technology, and the peer-reviewed Journal of Law and the Biosciences. Prior to joining the faculty, Professor Sachs was an Academic Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics and a Lecturer in Law at Harvard Law School. She also clerked for the Hon. Richard A. Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. She received her JD magna cum laude from Harvard Law School and a Master of Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health. She received her AB in Bioethics from Princeton University.

TODAY, 11/27 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with Vardit Ravitsky

November 27, 2017 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “The Shifting Landscape of Prenatal Testing: Between Reproductive Autonomy and Public Health”

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich@law.harvard.edu.

Vardit Ravitsky is an Associate Professor in Bioethics Programs in the Department of Social and Preventive Medicine at the University of Montreal School of Public Health, where she researches reproductive technologies, genetics, prenatal testing, research ethics, and health policy. She is the lead researcher on the Pegasus project, exploring ethical, legal, and social implications related to the implementation of non-invasive prenatal testing in Canada.

TODAY, 11/20 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with Thaddeus Pope

November 20, 2017 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

“From Informed Consent to Shared Decision Making: How Patient Decision Aids Can Improve Patient Safety and Reduce Medical Liability Risk.”  Download the presentation here.

Thaddeus Mason Pope is Professor of Law and Director of the Health Law Institute at the Mitchell Hamline School of Law. Pope joined Hamline University School of Law in January 2012 after serving as associate professor of law at Widener University School of Law. There, his research focused on medical futility, internal dispute resolution, tort law, public health law, and normative jurisprudence. He authors a blog on medical futility, reporting and discussing legislative, judicial, regulatory, medical, and other developments concerning end-of-life medical treatment.

Pope also taught at Albany Medical College and the University of Memphis. Prior to joining academia, he practiced at Arnold & Porter and clerked on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. Pope earned a JD and PhD in philosophy and bioethics from Georgetown University.

TODAY, 11/13 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with Allison Hoffman

November 13, 2017 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Health Care’s Market Bureaucracy”

To request a copy of the paper in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich@law.harvard.edu.

Allison K. Hoffman joined the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania Law School in fall 2017. Hoffman’s research examines the role of regulation and the welfare state in promoting health, as well as how regulation affects conceptions of risk and responsibility. Her recent work includes “Reimagining the Risk of Long Term Care” in the Yale Journal of Health Policy Law and Ethics—an article that argues for a more capacious vision of how we think about long-term care risk—and the Oxford Handbook of U.S. Health Law (2017), a volume co-edited with I. Glenn Cohen and William M. Sage. She also contributed a chapter to this volume entitled “What Health Reform Reveals about Health Law,” which explores the Affordable Care Act as a window into the idiosyncrasies of U.S. health care law and the values that have shaped this field. Her work and commentary has been featured in top media outlets, including the New York Times, The Huffington Post, the Wall Street Journal, Reuters, Morningstar, CNBC, the New York Daily News, Marketplace by American Public Media, Jotwell, and Penn Law’s Regulatory Review (formerly RegBlog).

Hoffman received her AB summa cum laude from Dartmouth College and her JD from Yale Law School. After graduating from law school, she practiced law at Ropes & Gray LLP, where she focused on health care regulation. Previously, she provided strategic advice to corporations and nonprofit organizations as a consultant at The Boston Consulting Group and The Bridgespan Group. Prior to joining the Penn faculty, Hoffman was a faculty member at UCLA Law School. She was previously an Academic Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

TODAY, 11/6 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with David Studdert

November 6, 2017 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “Once Ticketed, Twice Shy? Specific Deterrence from Road Traffic Laws”

David M. Studdert is Professor of Medicine and Professor of Law at Stanford University. He is a leading expert in the fields of health law and empirical legal research. His scholarship explores how the legal system influences the health and well-being of populations. A prolific scholar, he has authored more than 150 articles and book chapters, and his work appears frequently in leading international medical, law, and health policy publications.

Before joining the Stanford faculty, Studdert was on the faculty at the University of Melbourne (2007-13) and the Harvard School of Public Health (2000-06). He has also worked as a policy analyst at the RAND Corporation, a policy advisor to the Minister for Health in Australia, and a practicing attorney.

Studdert has received the Alice S. Hersh New Investigator Award from AcademyHealth, the leading organization for health services and health policy research in the United States. He was awarded a Federation Fellowship (2006) and a Laureate Fellowship (2011) by the Australian Research Council. He holds a law degree from University of Melbourne and a doctoral degree in health policy and public health from the Harvard School of Public Health.

TODAY, 10/30 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with Aziza Ahmed

October 30, 2017 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “‘Dead But Not Disabled’: A Feminist Legal Struggle for Recognition”

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich@law.harvard.edu.

Aziza Ahmed is Professor of Law at the Northeastern University School of Law. She is an internationally renowned expert in health law, criminal law and human rights. Her scholarship examines the role of science and activism in shaping global and national law and policy with a focus on criminal laws that impact health. She teaches Property Law, Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights, and International Health Law: Governance, Development and Rights. Professor Ahmed has been selected as a fellow with the Program in Law and Public Affairs (LAPA) at Princeton University. She will be combining her sabbatical and her fellowship to spend the 2017-2018 academic year developing her work on law, feminism and science into a book with particular emphasis on legal and policy responses to HIV.

Ahmed’s scholarship has appeared in the University of Miami Law ReviewAmerican Journal of Law and MedicineUniversity of Denver Law ReviewHarvard Journal of Law and GenderBoston University Law Review (online), and the American Journal of International Law (online), among other journals.

Prior to joining the School of Law, Ahmed was a research associate at the Harvard School of Public Health Program on International Health and Human Rights. She came to that position after a Women’s Law and Public Policy Fellowship with the International Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS (ICW). Ahmed has also consulted with various United Nations agencies and international and domestic non-governmental organizations.

Ahmed was a member of the Technical Advisory Group on HIV and the Law convened by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and has been an expert for many institutions, including the American Bar Association and UNDP. In 2016, she was appointed to serve a three-year term on the advisory board of the Northeastern University Humanities Center.

In addition to her BA and JD, Ahmed holds an MS in population and international health from the Harvard School of Public Health.

TODAY, 10/23 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with Belinda Bennett

October 23, 2017 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Law, Transformative Technologies and the Automation Age: Lessons from the Past for a High-Tech Future” 

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich@law.harvard.edu.

Belinda Bennett is a Visiting Scholar at the Petrie-Flom Center in fall 2017. She is Professor of Health Law and New Technologies in the School of Law at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia. She leads the Governance and Regulation of Health Care program within the Australian Centre for Health Law Research at QUT. Her current research addresses health law and globalisation, global public health law, and the legal and ethical challenges associated with regulation of new technologies in health care. Her publications include: M Freeman, S Hawkes and B Bennett (eds) Law and Global Health: Current Legal Issues Vol 16 (OUP, 2014); B Bennett, Health Law’s Kaleidoscope: Health Law Rights in a Global Age (Ashgate, 2008); and B Bennett, T Carney and I Karpin (eds) Brave New World of Health(Federation Press, 2008).

TODAY, 10/16 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with I. Glenn Cohen

October 16, 2017 5:00 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Cops, Docs, and Code: A Dialogue Between Big Data in Health Care and Predictive Policing” by I. Glenn Cohen & Harry S. Graver

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.

I. Glenn Cohen is Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

Glenn’s current research projects relate to health information technologies, mobile health, reproduction/reproductive technology, research ethics, rationing in law and medicine, health policy, FDA law and to medical tourism – the travel of patients who are residents of one country, the “home country,” to another country, the “destination country,” for medical treatment. His past work has included projects on end of life decision-making, FDA regulation and commodification.

 

TODAY, 10/2 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with Alicia Ely Yamin

October 2, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Democracy, Health Systems and the Right to Health: Narratives of Charity, Markets and Citizenship”

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich@law.harvard.edu.

Alicia Yamin is the Program Director of the Health and Human Rights Initiative. Prior to joining the O’Neill Institute, Alicia was a Lecturer on Law and Global Health at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, and the Director of the JD /MPH Program. Alicia was also the Policy Director at the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard, a Global Fellow at the Centre for Law and octal transformation in Norway, and was selected as the 2015-16 Marsha Lilien Gladstein Visiting Professor of Human Rights, University of Connecticut. Trained in both law and public health at Harvard, Yamin’s 20-year career at the intersection of health and human rights has bridged academia and activism.  From 2007 to 2011, Yamin held the prestigious Joseph H. Flom Fellowship on Global Health and Human Rights at Harvard Law School.  Prior to that, she served as Director of Research and Investigations at Physicians for Human Rights, where she oversaw all of the organization’s field investigations, and was on the faculty of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. Yamin was a member of the Board of Directors of the Center for Economic and Social Rights for 15 years and the Chair from 2009-2014. Continue reading

TODAY, 9/25 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with Francis Shen

September 25, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “How Dangerous are Youth Sports for the Brain? A Review of the Evidence”

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.  

Francis X. Shen is the third Senior Fellow in the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center. He is an Associate Professor at the University of Minnesota Law School, where he heads the Shen Neurolaw Lab. He also serves as Executive Director of Education and Outreach for the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience.

Professor Shen completed his BA in economics and English at the University of Chicago in 2000, his JD at Harvard Law School in 2006, and his PhD in government and social policy at Harvard University and the Kennedy School of Government in 2008. During graduate school he was a doctoral fellow in the Harvard University Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy, supported by the National Science Foundation. From 2007-09, he was a teaching fellow, lecturer, and assistant director of undergraduate studies in the Harvard Department of Government and received five Certificates of Distinction for Excellence in Teaching from Harvard’s Derek Bok Center. Continue reading

TODAY, 9/18 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with Jody Madeira

September 18, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “Terminating the Paper Trail: Evaluating the Efficacy of a Multimedia Informed Consent Application in Reproductive Medicine”

For context, please also read: “Is Informed Consent in Reproductive Medicine in Critical Condition?”

Jody L. Madeira is Professor of Law and Louis F. Niezer Faculty Fellow at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law. Her scholarly interests primarily involve the intersection of law and emotion in criminal and family law. Madeira’s new book, Killing McVeigh: The Death Penalty and the Myth of Closure, applies collective memory to criminal prosecution and sentencing, exploring the ways in which victims’ families and survivors came to comprehend and cope with the Oklahoma City bombing through membership in community groups as well as through attendance and participation in Timothy McVeigh’s prosecution and execution. She is also actively involved in empirical research projects assessing patient decision making and informed consent in assisted reproductive technology (ART).

Additionally, Madeira investigates the effects of legal proceedings, verdicts, and sentences upon victims’ families; the role of empathy in personal injury litigation; and the impact of recent developments in capital victims’ services upon the relationship between victims’ families and the criminal justice system.

Madeira earned her JD magna cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania School of Law, where she was elected to the Order of the Coif and served as Senior Articles Editor for the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law. She clerked for the Hon. Richard D. Cudahy at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. She then came to Harvard as a Climenko Fellow and Lecturer in Law, where she taught legal research and writing as well as a seminar on the cultural life of capital punishment. Madeira also recently served as a Research Associate at the Capital Punishment Research Initiative at the School of Criminal Justice, University at Albany, State University of New York.

TODAY, 9/11 at 5 PM: Health Law Workshop with William Sage

September 11, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “Fracking Health Care: The Need to Safely De-Medicalize America and Recover Trapped Value for Its People”

William M. Sage is James R. Dougherty Chair for Faculty Excellence at the University of Texas-Austin Law School and Professor (Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care) in the Dell Medical School.

TODAY, 4/17 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Judith Daar

April 17, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “A Clash at the Petri Dish: Transferring Embryos with Known Genetic Anomalies”

Judith Daar is Professor of Law at Whittier Law School with a joint appointment at the UCI School of Medicine. She focuses her teaching and scholarship at the intersection of law, medicine and ethics. Her interdisciplinary work in law and medicine focuses in the area of reproductive medicine, where she holds leadership positions including Chair of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Ethics Committee. In 2005, Professor Daar became Chair of the Association of American Law School’s Section on Law, Medicine and Health Care, and in 2006 she was named to the Board of Directors of the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics. She was elected President of ASLME in 2009 and re-elected for a second term in 2010. In 2007, she was appointed to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technologies, Committee on Informed Consent in ART, an interdisciplinary group of physicians and attorneys charged with drafting a model informed consent document for patients undergoing in vitro fertilization. From 2008 to 2012, Professor Daar served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. In 2012, she was elected to the American Law Institute.

Professor Daar is a member of the UCI Medical Center Medical Ethics Committee, where she serves on the Bioethics Consultation Team. She has also served as a member of the Harbor-UCLA Hospital Institutional Review Board, and the ABACoordinating Group on Bioethics. Professor Daar has lectured extensively in the field of reproductive medicine, including giving testimony to the California legislature and the National Academies of Science, Committee on Science, Technology, and Law on the issue of oversight and regulation of reproductive medicine. Her scholarship focuses in the area of assisted reproductive technologies where she has authored over one hundred articles, book chapters, editorials and white papers on topics including stem cell research, human cloning, frozen embryo disputes, the use of genetic technologies and the regulation of reproductive medicine. Her first book, Reproductive Technologies and the Law, was published in January 2006, with a second edition appearing in 2013. Her most recent book, The New Eugenics: Selective Breeding in an Era of Reproductive Technologies, will be published by Yale University Press.

TODAY, 4/10 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Leo Beletsky

April 10, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the presentation: “America’s Favorite Antidote: Murder-By-Overdose in the Age of the Opioid Epidemic”

Leo Beletsky is Associate Professor of Law and Health Sciences with a joint appointment with the School of Law and Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University. His expertise is on the use of law to advance public health. He utilizes empirical and theoretical approaches to analyze how legal mechanisms can help curb substance abuse, prevent the spread of HIV and other infectious diseases, and improve patient care. By highlighting discrepancies between black letter law and its real-world implementation, he also examines the relationship between police practices, public health outcomes, and human rights of vulnerable groups. Professor Beletsky communicates this work to legal, scientific and mainstream audiences, including as a contributor to The Huffington Post.

Throughout his career, Beletsky has applied his skills and expertise in service to governmental agencies and non-governmental organizations, including UNAIDS, US Department of Justice, the City of New York and the Open Society Foundations. This involvement has focused on legal reform and programmatic efforts to better align law and policing with community health. His commitment to translating lessons learned between domestic and international settings has informed a portfolio of projects across the Americas (US and Mexico), Central and East Asia (China, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan) and Eastern Europe (Russia and Ukraine).

Prior to joining the Northeastern community, Professor Beletsky was on the faculty of the Division of Global Public Health at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, where he retains an adjunct appointment. He received his undergraduate training in geography from Vassar College and Oxford University, a master’s in public health from Brown University, his law degree from Temple University School of Law, and his post-doctoral training at the Yale University Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. He is a member of the New York State Bar.

TODAY, 3/27 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Kathryn Zeiler

March 27, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Communication-And-Resolution Programs: The Numbers Don’t Add Up”

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.

Kathryn Zeiler is Professor of Law and Nancy Barton Scholar at the BU School of Law. Prior to joining the BU faculty, Zeiler was Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center (2003–2015). She has held visiting professorships at Harvard Law School, NYU School of Law, and Boston University School of Law. In Fall 2010 she was a Senior Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center.

Zeiler’s scholarship applies economic theory and empirical methods to the study of legal issues and research questions. Her main scholarly interests include the importation of experimental economics results and behavioral economics theories into legal scholarship, the impact of state legislative tort damages caps on the price of medical malpractice insurance premiums, the impacts of communication and resolution programs implemented by hospitals to resolve medical malpractice claims, and the role of medical malpractice insurers in patient safety.

Zeiler serves as a fellow and member of the board for the Society of Empirical Legal Studies (2015–present). She currently holds positions on the editorial board of the American Law and Economics Review and Behavioral Science and Policy. She is a member of the Max Planck Institute’s Scientific Review Board for Research on Collective Goods. She has served as a member of the board of directors of the American Law and Economics Association (2010–2012). She is a regular peer-reviewer for a number of economics journals and law and economics journals.

Her recent publications include “Against Endowment Theory: Experimental Economics and Legal Scholarship” (UCLA Law Review), “Do Damages Caps Reduce Medical Malpractice Insurance Premiums?: A Systematic Review of Estimates and the Methods Used to Produce Them” (Research Handbook on the Economics of Torts), “The Willingness to Pay-Willingness to Accept Gap, the “Endowment Effect,” Subject Misconceptions, and Experimental Procedures for Eliciting Valuations: Reply” (American Economic Review), “Cautions on the Use of Economics Experiments in Law” (Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics), and “Medical Malpractice Liability Crisis or Patient Compensation Crisis? (DePaul Law Review, Rising Stars Symposium).

TODAY, 3/6 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Khiara Bridges

March 6, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation

Download the presentation: 

Note from the Presenter:

I am circulating the introductory chapter from my first ethnography, Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization, and a book proposal for my as yet untitled second ethnography.

My first book grew out of eighteen months of ethnographic fieldwork research that I conducted in the obstetrics clinic of a public hospital in New York City. I found myself in the clinic because I was interested in studying race as a process: I wanted to explore how ideas about race are made material on the bodies of poor women during the event of pregnancy. Moreover, I was curious about the role of the law in this process of race-making.

What I did not realize back when I was writing Reproducing Race was that the book would be a prelude to my second ethnography—a book about which I am now beginning to think. This ethnography will extend the analysis began in Reproducing Race to affluent women of color. Reproducing Race revealed that poor, pregnant women of color are treated in ways that are significantly different from the ways in which wealthier pregnant women are treated. But, how much of that different treatment is an effect of race? How much of it is an effect of class? By training its focus on women of color with class privilege, my second ethnography will try to figure it all out. Thus, the central preoccupation that motivates the study is the complex relationship between race and class. How does class privilege alter the experience of race? How does one’s status as a racial minority alter the experience of class privilege?

The second ethnography is very much in its earlier stages. So, any and all feedback on this project is welcome.

About the Presenter

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