Back To School Special Part 1 on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!twihl 5x5

Our annual Back To School Special returns in time for a new semester. In this first part we welcome TWIHL all-stars Nick Bagley, Micah Berman, Glenn Cohen, and Nicole Huberfeld. Our conversations covered a lot of ground including CSR payments, House v. Price, gene editing, the Trump administration’s approach to regulation, healthcare federalism, and the future of waivers under CMS’s new management. Our guests on Twitter include @MicahLBerman, @CohenProf, and @nicholas_bagley.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio Tunein, or Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Erika Lietzan on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!twihl 5x5

This week’s TWIHL is a deep dive into pharmaceutical patent protection and its intersection with the FDA new drug approval process. We touch on molecular drugs, biosimilarsdata exclusivity, market exclusivity, the runway to generics, and fascinating differentials between different drug types or families. This is an intensely complex area and we were glad to have the benefit of a truly expert guide, Erika Lietzan, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Missouri, @lietzan on Twitter, and author of the blog Objective Intent, which explores legal and policy issues associated with the FDA.

Erika was a partner at Covington & Burling, and was deeply immersed for more than a decade in the development of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2010 (creating a pathway for approval of biosimilars), from initial thinking as early as 2002 through negotiation of the primary legislative language in 2006 and 2007, passage in 2009, and enactment in 2010. After enactment she co-authored a comprehensive “legislative history” of this process in the Food and Drug Law Journal. She also worked with individual companies and trade associations on implementation issues from 2010 through 2014.

Erika is an elected member of the American Law Institute, serves in the leadership of the Food & Drug Law Institute and served for many years in the leadership of the Science and Technology Section of the American Bar Association. She is also an active member of the American Health Lawyers Association, the American Intellectual Property Law Association, and the American Society of Law, Medicine, and Ethics.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio Tunein, or Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Ameet Sarpatwari and Aaron Kesselheim on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!twihl 5x5

Two of the nation’s leading researchers into prescription drug costs join us for an in-depth exploration of the reasons for our high and increasing drug bill, and a critical analysis of some of the investment, transparency, value, and outcomes-based metrics being used to determine fair prescription drug costs. Ameet Sarpatwari is an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an Associate Epidemiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital based in the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) within the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, and Aaron S. Kesselheim is PORTAL Director and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Research Associate at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. During the program, Frank mentioned the book-in-progress Infection: The Health Crisis in the Developing World and What We Should Do About It, by William W. Fisher III and Talha Syed, in the context of a discussion of drug importation, reflecting concerns he expressed in a 2009 article.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio Tunein, or Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Prime Health: Should Amazon Purchase a Hospital Chain?

Cross-posted from Medium.

By Nicolas Terry

The devotees of digital health and disruption recently lit up the Internet after reports that Amazon had deployed a secret health tech team codenamed 1492 (presumably a reference to healthcare visionary Columbus). The real surprise would be if Amazon did not have such a team in place. Other tech companies, Alphabet, Apple, IBM, Samsung, et al, understand that, while a latecomer to technologies, future healthcare will be data-driven and that there will be multiple opportunities to sell cloud storage, analytics services, and immodestly-priced wearables.

But, let’s pose a far more interesting question. What if Amazon decided to go beyond participating in upstart digital health with its interest in wellness, and took a swing at traditional healthcare and sickness? What, in other words, if Amazon purchased a hospital chain or network? Let’s assume that “1492” is the internal code name for Prime Health. On its face, the idea of what only a few years ago was just an online bookseller entering the healthcare field seems ridiculous. After all, healthcare is more complicated by several orders of magnitude than any other industry. Also, healthcare is particularly hard for outsiders to disrupt due to intrinsic market failures, overarching structural issues, the illiquidity of healthcare data, provider and patient heterogeneity, underperforming HIT technologies, third-party reimbursement, and so on. Saliently, healthcare is not about warehousing hard goods and distributing them with AI-based logistics. Rather, healthcare is all about bricks-and mortar facilities, services more that goods, face-to-face interactions, neighborhoods, customer needs that cannot be left to “spoil,” and a “last mile” problem that is incredibly hard to solve with technology. In other words, it’s quite like selling groceries. However, here’s the thing, Amazon recently purchased the upscale grocery chain Whole Foods for $13.4 Billion! Continue reading

Wendy Epstein on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!twihl 5x5

Our guest this week is Wendy Netter Epstein, who is an Associate Professor of Law at DePaul University, and Faculty Director of DePaul’s Jaharis Health Law Institute. Her teaching and research interests focus on health care law and policy, contracts, and commercial law. Professor Epstein has won Excellence in Teaching Awards from both DePaul University and the College of Law. We discussed some of her research on contract law and health care, including “The Health Insurer Nudge.”

The lightning round this week included a discussion of institutional liability, and divergent paths for antitrust (the Obama/Trump emphasis on professions and occupational licensure, or the Better Deal focus on mergers). Recalling our conversations with Guian McKee and Jessica Mantel, we also discussed the macroeconomic impact of health care institutions. Obamacare certainly helped Detroit, but Dan Diamond worries that the Cleveland Clinic (and many other hospitals) are not providing levels of community benefit high enough to justify their tax exemption.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio Tunein, or Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Claudia Pagliari on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!twihl 5x5

On another international episode of the Pod we chat with Claudia Pagliari, Senior Lecturer in Primary Care and Informatics and Director of Global eHealth at Edinburgh University in the UK. A psychologist by training she is an internationally recognized expert in health informatics. Our broad-ranging discussion touched on digital technology for health sector governance in low and middle income countries, drug advertising rules (including in Zimbabwe), DTC genetic tests and informed choice, medical app curation, and transatlantic perspectives on data sharing.

Speaking of curation–aside from her prolific, far-ranging, and insightful scholarship, Claudia also aggregates a great deal of interesting perspectives on digital health & society, theory, design, policy, evaluation, innovation, ethics, on Twitter at @EeHRN. Be sure to follow her there!

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio Tunein, or Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

An All Lightning Round ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

Frank and Nic internalize their travel issues and try to get to grips with some of the recent stories from healthcare land. Among the stories we discuss are the UK Information Commissioner’s report on the Royal Free – Google DeepMind trial, US-EU competition policy (another Google case), a class action in Alaska involving a DTC genetic service that is butting heads with a very strongly worded state statute, the opioid crisis seen through a litigation lens, and our latest thoughts, rants, and questions about health reform/repeal including the latest on the three-legged stool and cost-sharing subsidies.

As for Google DeepMind, we start with a discussion of how Google DeepMind trial failed to comply with data protection law. We discuss Google’s larger problems with the EU Competition and Franks’s response to US skepticism about the case. Continue reading

Leslie Francis and John Francis on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!twihl 5x5

Two very special guests and the Pod’s first power couple interview. This week we talk with Leslie P. Francis and John G. Francis about their new book, Privacy: What Everyone Needs to Know. Leslie Francis is a professor of law and a professor of philosophy at the University of Utah, and John Francis is a research professor in the Political Science Department, also at the University of Utah.

Leslie is one of our leading privacy scholars and John is an expert in comparative politics and regulatory policy, ethics, and data policy. We explored privacy theory, how privacy differs between economic domains, and the relative benefits of consent, use, and delinking regulation.

As the Francises explain, “A great deal is at stake for individuals, groups, and societies if privacy is misunderstood, misdirected, or misused. Popular understanding of privacy doesn’t match the heat the concept generates. With a host of cultural differences as to how privacy is understood globally and in different religions, and with ceaseless technological advancements, it is an increasingly complex topic.”

We cover several areas of health privacy, and also zoom out and consider health data in the context of other recent controversies in data protection and management (such as the right to be forgotten). The Francises seamlessly weave together legal, philosophical, bioethical, and regulatory perspectives on privacy while providing direct yet nuanced answers to common questions about it. We hope TWIHL listeners will enjoy this conversation, and check out the book!

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio Tunein, or Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Michele Goodwin on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!twihl 5x5

This week, University of California, Irvine Law Professor Michele Bratcher Goodwin offers a detailed and insightful analysis of an increasingly adversarial relationship between women and the state. In a series of articles, Goodwin has demonstrated that pregnancy is being policed by an array of oppressive state laws, many of which are being used in contexts far removed from their legislative intent. She asks in “The Pregnancy Penalty,” “If a woman is fourteen times more likely to die during pregnancy and childbirth than terminating a pregnancy through a legal abortion, why do some lawmakers resist support for contraception and seek to criminalize abortions?” Today’s podcast includes many troubling answers, rooted in historical and social theoretical analysis.Our conversation includes a detailed look at leading abortion cases and their limitations. We end with a disturbing narrative about under-age marriages in the US, often in circumstances that otherwise would be statutory rape. Goodwin describes the failed institutions that have made underage marriage a global problem.

Michele Goodwin is a Chancellor’s Professor at the University of California, Irvine with appointments at the School of Law; Program in Public Health; Department of Criminology, Law, & Society; Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies; and Stem Cell Research Center. Her publications include six books and over 80 articles and book chapters on law’s regulation of the human body, including civil and criminal regulation of pregnancy and reproduction, reproductive technologies, human trafficking (for organs, sex, and marriage), and tissue and organ transplantation.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio Tunein, or Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Jaime King on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

Hastings law professor and antitrust expert Jaime King joins us to discuss competition and consolidation in healthcare delivery. We discussed (apparently) pro-competitive collaborations, price transparency models, the limits of demand-side reforms, Gobeille’s interpretation of ERISA as a major blow to state initiatives, and innovative cross-market merger activity. Be sure to follow Jaime’s scholarly work at SSRN, and to keep up with her Source on Health Care Price & Competition, which has up-to-the-minute aggregators on key issues in health care finance.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio Tunein, or Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

The 100th ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

This week, we celebrate Episode 100! Like Episode 1 from 2015, it’s just the two of us–revisiting topics from the first show, commenting on the current health policy landscape, and exploring past and present projects in health information law, privacy, data protection, and AI. Nic’s SSRN page is here, and Frank’s is here.

And we leave you with two of our recent public lectures: Nic Terry’s Rome Lecture (Appification to AI and Healthcare’s New Iron Triangle), and Frank Pasquale’s reflections on the political economy of health automation (inter alia).  Enjoy!

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio Tunein, or Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Wendy Parmet on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

Our return guest this week is Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law, Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Director of the Program on Health Policy and Law, and Associate Dean for Interdisciplinary Education and Research Support at Northeastern University School of Law.  Professor Parmet is a leading voice internationally on cutting edge issues in public health. She also recently won the ASLME’s Jay Healey Health Law Teachers Award.

Our discussion focused on The Health of Newcomers: Immigration, Health Policy, and the Case for Global Solidaritya recent book of Wendy’s (co-authored with philosopher Patricia Illingworth). This is a far-reaching interdisciplinary inquiry, which closely examines the interdependence of natives and newcomers across several health dimensions. Our discussion progresses into an old Pod favorite, “Docs and Glocks,” before ending with some observations on the current state of scientific knowledge regarding opioid interventions.

Continue reading

Laura Katz Olson on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

Our guest this week is Laura Katz Olson, Professor of Political Science at Lehigh University. Laura is the author of eight books, including The Politics of Medicaid and Elder Care Journey. Olson has published widely in the field of aging, health care and women’s studies, her articles addressing such topics as Medicaid, Medicare, long-term care of the elderly, pensions, Social Security and problems experienced by older women. She has been a Scholar at the Social Security Administration, a Gerontological Fellow and a Fulbright Scholar. She is also on the editorial board of the Journal of Aging Studies and New Political Science.

Our conversation first focused on recent developments in federal health policy, including slashing cuts to Medicaid in proposed budgets. We then discussed Elder Care Journey, an insightful mix of Laura’s personal experience seeking long term care for her mother, and her connection of that experience to failures in US policy on aging. The personal is indeed political, and Laura connects negative experiences ranging from quotidian frustration to alarming neglect, to a set of health laws and policies that fails to offer adequate support to dementia patients and their caregivers.

Continue reading

Nathan Cortez on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

With help from our good friend Nathan Cortez from SMU School of Law we discuss the American Health Care Act. Nathan is a thought leader in both health law and policy and administrative law and legislation–intersecting forms of expertise particularly valuable in these turbulent times.

In addition to coming to grips with some of its complex provisions, we speculated on how it will fare in the Senate, given emerging details about working groups and Democratic bridge-building by the Gang of Three (Joe Manchin, Heidi Heitkamp, and Tim “Copper Plan” Kaine). Here Professor Cortez’s expertise on Reconciliation and the Byrd Amendment proved essential. We also, let truth be told, took the opportunity to get a few things off our collective chests!

For background on AHCA: Andy Slavitt has been a diligent collector of summaries & critical commentary. In a media environment where the lies being told about AHCA’s effects on coverage are described as “flagrant,” “bald-faced,” and “gas-lighting,” expert voices are needed now more than ever. Some predict that the class warfare embodied in the bill’s distributional effects would cause a “humanitarian crisis” if it came to pass; others worry it would undo the pillars of not merely Obamacare and Medicaid, but also employer-sponsored plans. One thing appears certain: expect bankruptcy law to renew its advance onto health law syllabi. Continue reading

Robert Smoldt on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

We are joined by Robert K. Smoldt, Chief Administrative Officer emeritus of Mayo Clinic and Associate Director of the Arizona State University Healthcare Delivery and Policy Program. Robert has been involved in healthcare administration for over 30 years — both with the U.S. Air Force and Mayo. Mr. Smoldt joined Mayo in 1972, and he has worked in a variety of administrative positions in both medical and surgical departments. Prior to his CAO role, he served as chair of the Department of Planning and Public Affairs.

The topics discussed with Robert are alternate payment systems, including pay for value. We do a deep dive into P4P (pay for performance) and P4V (pay for value), elicit comparisons with healthcare in Japan, and ponder integrated care models and the future of health policy.

We also discussed “provider-specific benchmarks that reward improvement rather than the level of performance,” and several other unintended consequences of Advanced Payment Models (APMs). We’re sure you will find Robert’s edifying insights a vital part of top-level dialogue on the future of health care finance.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio, Tunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw.

Khiara Bridges on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

Khiara Bridges, Professor of Law and Professor of Anthropology at Boston University, joins us for an in-depth discussion of her new book The Poverty of Privacy Rights. The book takes a highly critical look at how Medicaid recipients are treated and whether they are left with any (or any meaningful) privacy rights. Khiara’s unique combination of social science research and legal analysis builds on her prior work in Reproducing Racean ethnography of pregnancy and birth at a large New York City public hospital, which explored the role of race in the medical setting. A contribution to anthropology, privacy law scholarship, and critical race theory, Bridges’ work should inform high level academic and policy debates about data collection, analysis, and use.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio, Tunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw.

Elizabeth Tobin-Tyler on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

Brown University School of Public Health researcher and teacher Elizabeth Tobin-Tyler joins us for a far-reaching conversation about social determinants of health. In particular, we discuss medico-legal partnerships and their role in filling unmet legal needs that are themselves increasingly recognized as social determinants. We discuss issues framed by Professor Tobin-Tyler’s scholarship such as professionalism, conflicts of interest, funding, and medico-legal education.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at Apple Podcasts, listen at Stitcher Radio, Tunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw.

Deborah Stone on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

We are joined by Deborah Stone, Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. She is famous for her classic, Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making, a magisterial account of goals, problems, and solutions in a wide array of policy conflicts.

Policy Paradox has had four editions over 25 years and has been translated into five languages. As Stone argues in the book, “behind every policy issue lurks a contest over conflicting, though equally plausible, conceptions of the same abstract goal or value.” Recognizing the deep pluralism of values and aims, Stone wisely counsels that “the job of the policy designer…is to understand the rules of the game well enough to know the standard moves and countermoves, and to think about them strategically.”

With this theoretical structure firmly in mind, we discuss the ACA and healthcare in the world of Trump. We also asked Deborah about her article “Caring Communities: What Would it Take?,” a patient-centered, care-focused counter-narrative to technocratic quantification. Grounding present conflicts in a longer-term view of the role of policymakers in a democracy, Stone offers perspective on the future of health equity in a polity where even the basic concept of risk pooling now appears contestable.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher Radio, Tunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw.

Heather Howard on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

Health policy researcher Heather H. Howard returns to the pod and, not surprisingly, Medicaid was the focus of our talk. Howard is a lecturer at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, where she teaches courses on implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the social determinants of health, and state and local health policy. She works with states implementing health reforms and served as New Jersey’s Commissioner of Health and Senior Services from 2008-2010. She tweets at @HeatherHHoward.

We discussed various Medicaid issues; the extent non-expansion was driven by policy or politics, work requirements under Section 1115 waivers, state administrative costs associated with draconian Medicaid expansion criteria (particularly when compared to the macroeconomic effects of a robust healthcare system), cost-sharing and the “private option” in existing state plans, and the likelihood of Section 1332 waivers moving states to universal care or, at least, meaningful innovation.

Our lightning round addressed various issues, including an Altarum study on the macroeconomic effects of the ACA, and state AG’s actions regarding mHealth apps and privacy.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher Radio, Tunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on Twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw.

Craig Garthwaite on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

Subscribe to TWIHL here!

twihl 5x5

Our guest this week is Craig Garthwaite, Associate Professor of Strategy and the Co-Director of the Health Enterprise Management Program (HEMA) at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. An applied microeconomist, Craig has published research on how changes in law and policy affect the health and biopharmaceutical sectors.

After a quick review of the AHCA collapse’s aftermath, we discussed why the rate of increase of health care spending has been declining. We covered his 2012 article, “The Doctor Might See You Now: The Supply Side of Public Health Insurance Expansions,” and looked at the nonprofit hospital as “insurer of last resort” when other forms of financing care are not available. We closed with some dystopian speculation: what if Trump predictions of ACA’s “collapsing” become a self-fulfilling prophecy?

As the highly unstable health policy landscape approaches Inception-level complexity, be sure to follow Craig’s blogging at Code Red, where he and David Dranove offer economic perspectives on the US health care system.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher Radio, Tunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw