George Annas on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

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This week we talked with George J. Annas, Chairman of the Bioethics & Human Rights Department, and William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor, at Boston University. George’s work is legendary among health policy experts; a 1998 tribute from Jay Katz gives some sense of its breadth and depth. Having reviewed numerous works, Katz states:”I have barely conveyed the richness of George Annas’ observations on the ambiguities in motivations and actions that persist in current research practices. The many recommendations he makes, should be of valuable assistance to those interested in reforming current rules governing research on humans. Plagued by Dreams…reveal[s] another facet of George Annas’ personality: His commitment to public advocacy. He values scholarship but he also wants it to have an impact on shaping institutions and health care policies…In the many settings in which I have encountered George Annas over the years, I have admired his boldness, intellect, compassion and moral vigor.” Our conversation had the theme  “paternalism & its critics,” based on articles George had recently authored (or co-authored with last week’s guest, Wendy Mariner) on informed consent, genomics, and sugary drinks.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher Radio, Tunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

TWIHL Special: Wendy Mariner Analyzes the New Wellness Regulations

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

twihl 5x5A special TWIHL episode with analysis of the new EEOC regulations under the ADA and GINA on Employer Wellness Plans. Nic is joined by Professor Wendy Mariner. Professor Mariner is the Edward R. Utley Professor of Health Law at Boston University School of Public Health, Professor of Law at Boston University School of Law, Professor at Boston University School of Medicine, and Co-Director of the J.D.-M.P.H. joint degree program, and a member of the faculty of the Center for Health Law, Ethics and Human Rights at BUSPH. Professor Mariner’s research focuses on laws governing health risks, including social and personal responsibility for risk creation, health insurance systems, implementation of the Affordable Care Act, ERISA, health information privacy, and population health policy.

Our discussion concentrated on the ADA regulation and examined how the agency responded to comments (including ours), the concept of voluntariness, the status of EEOC v. Flambeau, Inc., data protection (including issues raised when  employers research the health of their employees), and the policy flaws in the wellness space.The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy.

Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Elizabeth Sepper on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

 

This week we interviewed Elizabeth Sepper, Associatetwihl 5x5 Professor of Law at Washington University. Elizabeth’s work explores the interaction of morality, professional ethics, and law in health care and insurance. She has written extensively on conscientious refusals to provide reproductive and end-of-life healthcare In recent work, Elizabeth has argued that, in resisting compliance with antidiscrimination laws, pharmacy regulations, and insurance mandates (most prominently, the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive mandate), businesses make claims more reminiscent of market libertarianism than of religious freedom.

Our conversation covered many aspects of conscience claims by contemporary health providers. Our timing was perfect, since HHS just finalized a rule on one of Elizabeth’s areas of expertise: prohibitions on discrimination based on race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. Elizabeth weighed in on the rule and its implications for the future of health care.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Christina Ho on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

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This week we interviewed Christina S. Ho, Associate Professor of Law at Rutgers University. Christina worked on the Domestic Policy Council at the White House and later led Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton’s health legislative staff.

In our lightning round, we discussed an important new study on medical errors as a leading cause of death in the United States. We also addressed the news of Google’s access to health data in Britain, and ongoing controversies at HSCIC (now rebranded NHS Digital).

We asked Christina about her cutting edge work on the Chinese health care system, the right to health care, and comparative health law generally.While China only spends about 5.5% of GDP on health care, almost 50% of the spending is on pharmaceuticals. Christina offers an insightful look at the past, present, and likely near future of Chinese health reforms.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

James Hodge on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

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This week’s guest was James G. Hodge, Jr., JD, LLM, Professor of Public Health Law and Ethics and Director of the Public Health Law and Policy Program at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University. Through scholarship, teaching, and applied projects, Professor Hodge delves into multiple areas of health law, public health law, global health law, ethics, and human rights.

Our lightning round this week focused on drug prices. Nic analyzed a California referendum proposal and the general potential of state drug price cap laws. Frank noted that New York’s Medicaid program and private insurers now must take a much more humane approach with respect to state-of-the-art treatment for Hepatitis C.

Our conversation with James focused on his recent work addressing the Zika virus. We covered topics ranging from the genetic modification of mosquitoes to the Puerto Rico financial crisis, and legal interventions ranging from budget requests to quarantines to price controls for condoms and mosquito repellent.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Heather Howard on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

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This week we talked with Heather H. Howard, Lecturer in Public Affairs at Princeton University and Director of the State Health Reform Assistance Network. She served as New Jersey’s Commissioner of Health and Senior Services from 2008-2010, overseeing a cabinet-level agency with a budget of $3.5 billion and staff of 1,700 responsible for public health services, regulation of health care institutions, senior services, and health care policy and research.

Our lightning round “closed the loop” on some prior stories. Nic noted a big fine against a hospital which may end ER reality shows (or at least raise the price of their insurance policies), and a smaller action from OCR with a simple message: covered entities need to complete their BAAs! Prior show guest Nicholas Bagley offered an administrative end run around Gobeille. We also discussed the kaleidoscopic complexity of modern insurance markets.

Our conversation with Heather touched on her pastpresent, and future work on ACA 1332 waivers. If you care about innovation in state health policy, this podcast is for you.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Leo Beletsky on ‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

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This week we interviewed Leo Beletsky, Associate Professor of Law and Health Sciences at Northeastern University. Leo utilizes empirical and theoretical approaches to analyze how legal mechanisms can help curb substance abuse, prevent the spread of HIV and other infectious diseases and improve patient care. By highlighting discrepancies between black letter law and its real-world implementation, he also examines the relationship between police practices, public health outcomes and human rights of vulnerable groups.

We had plenty of opportunity to apply Leo’s expertise to the topic we focused on this week: opioid addiction. Recent studies have demonstrated a rapidly rising rate of opioid abuse, with troubling consequences for individuals and communities. This drug use has also attracted a host of legal responses, which Leo has expertly dissected in past work (including some recent studies here).

Our lightning round featured discussions of recent research on income and life expectancy, the emerging natural experiment in Kentucky on Medicaid rollback, and insurer mergers.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

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Our return guest this week is Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law, Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Director of the Program on Health Policy and Law, and Associate Dean for Interdisciplinary Education and Research Support at Northeastern University School of Law.  Professor Parmet is a leading voice internationally on cutting edge issues in public health.

In the opening, lightning round, Nic and Frank discussed:
1) Zubik v. Burwell, and the long line of First Amendment cases in the area.
2) The FTC’s new interactive tool for mobile apps.
3) The Part 2 proposed rule, and AMIA’s comment.
4) In the series Frontiers in the Financialization of Health Care, mortgages for expensive treatments, and crowdfunded funerals.

Our focus on Flint, Michigan this week featured Wendy’s insightful work on solidarity in bioethics, and “invisible victims” of public health failures. We also discussed the Docs v. Glocks saga, and the limits of regulation of professional speech.

And finally, attention all listeners: Northeastern will be hosting a conference on the future of public health law this Friday, and Wendy’s book “Welcoming Newcomers” will be out this Fall!

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

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This week we interviewed Christopher Robertson, a professor and associate dean at the James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona, and affiliated faculty with the Petrie Flom Center for Health Care Policy, Bioethics and Biotechnology at Harvard. Robertson also leads the Regulatory Science program, a partnership with the Arizona Health Sciences Center and the Critical Path Institute.

We mainly discussed Robertson’s new book with past TWIHL guest Aaron Kesselheim, Blinding as a Solution to Bias:  Strengthening Biomedical Science, Forensic Science, and Law. The book is a tour de force collection of approaches to improving our knowledge of optimal medical, legal, and forensic practices.

We also discussed some of Robertson’s recent contributions to insurance law and policy, including Scaling Cost-Sharing to Wages: How Employers Can Reduce Health Spending and Provide Greater Economic Security, as well as A Randomized Experiment of the Split Benefit Health Insurance Reform to Reduce High-Cost, Low-Value Consumption. The latter work, combined with Episode 47’s discussion with Mark Hall about employer-based exchanges, may well signal a gradual transition toward defined contribution (rather than defined benefit) health insurance plans.

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

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This week we talked with prolific health law scholar Mark Hall, Director of the Health Law and Policy Program and Fred D. & Elizabeth L. Turnage Professor of Law at Wake Forest University School of Law.

Our discussion started with Medicaid expansion and a fascinating paper, Medicaid Expansion Costs in North Carolina: A Frank Discussion (with Edwin Shoaf) that takes a rigorous cost-benefit approach to the topic. Next up we discussed the potential for employer private exchanges and some of their legal implications. Finally, we looked back on Mark’s 2014 frank assessment of the ACA. Check out Mark’s SSRN page for more of his contributions to the health law and policy literature.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

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This week we talked to Professor Erin C. Fuse Brown of Georgia State University’s College of Law (a previous guest on episodes 5 and 22!).  We discussed her fascinating work on the law & policy of health care pricing, including work on cost-control and consolidation (with Jaime S. King). Be sure to check out her SSRN Page for other important work on ongoing efforts to bend the cost curve in health care and assure more universal access to care.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

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This week we talked with Professor Efthimi Parasidis, who holds a joint appointment with The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law and the College of Public Health, and is a faculty affiliate of College of Medicine’s Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities. His scholarship focuses on the regulation of medical products and human subjects research, the interplay between health law and intellectual property, and the application of health information technology to public health policy.The Greenwall Foundation awarded Professor Parasidis a Faculty Scholar in Bioethics fellowship for 2014-2017.

We started the podcast with a discussion of SCOTUS’s latest ERISA preemption case, GobeilleWe then moved on to HHS’s proposed rule on EHR certification. (For background on the latter topic, see Frank’s “Private Certifiers & Deputies in US Health Care.”). Finally, a big congratulations to Nic on his invitation to the White House’s recent Precision Medicine Initiative.

We tried to cover the range of Efthimi’s latest publications and research, but it was difficult! The discussion ranged from empirical research on “natural food” labeling (and its First Amendment implications), research ethics regarding cognitive enhancement of soldiers, the future of pharmacovigilance, and the diversity of views of vaccine objectors. Hop over to his SSRN page to see his work on these and other topics.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale

This week we interviewed Nicole B. Porter at the University of Toledo College of Law. Nicole has served as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Toledo. Her research interests focus on the employment rights of women and individuals with disabilities. She teaches Employment Discrimination, Disability Law, Criminal Law, Contracts, and Feminist Legal Theory.
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Nicole’s expertise on the Americans with Disabilities Act is nonpareil, and she discussed several dimensions of ADA practice and advocacy. Nicole’s recent scholarship in the area includes Special Treatment Stigma After the ADA Amendments ActThe Difficulty Accommodating Healthcare Workers, Withdrawn Accommodations, and The New ADA BacklashThe show includes both background on the ADA’s purpose and initial reception, as well as up-to-date analysis of its present application.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry

This week we interviewed Dayna Matthew, Professor of Law at the University of Colorado Law School. Professor Matthew brings an interdisciplinary approach to the study of health law. She holds a joint appointment at the Colorado School of Public Health and is co-founder of the Colorado Health Equity Project, a medical legal partnership whose mission is to remove barriers to good health for low income clients by providing legal representation, research, and policy advocacy. twihl 5x5

We discussed her excellent new book, Just Medicine: A Cure for Racial Inequality in American Health Care.  The book discusses shocking disparities in US health care treatment and outcomes, and proposes a bold agenda for addressing them. Laws like the ACA and even the CRA (as presently written) are not capable of addressing present manifestations of bias (both inside and outside formal health care institutions). Professor Matthew develops the Biased Care Model as a core contributions to advance understanding of health and health care disparities. She also proposes concrete legislative changes, discussed on the show, to counteract biased care.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry

This week we interviewed Charles Ornstein, a senior reporter for ProPublica covering health care and the pharmaceutical industry. ProPublica has been at the cutting edge of twihl 5x5technology, health, and privacy reporting, and Ornstein’s work there has exposed both the personal narratives and hard data behind an American epidemic of privacy violations. We cover some of his recent hits in this conversation, and reflect on what it would take to see an effective health privacy regime in the US. HITECH geeks will love the discussion of “accounting of disclosures” at the end.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Liability for Mobile Health and Wearable Technologies

Lindsay Wiley and I just posted Liability for Mobile Health and Wearable Technologies that is forthcoming in Annals of Health Law. As we argue–Most of the legal commentary regarding mobile health has focused on direct regulation leveraging existing laws and regulators such as HIPAA privacy through HHS-OCR or device regulation by the FDA. However, much of the mobile health revolution likely will play out in lightly regulated spaces bereft of most of the privacy, security, and safety rules associated with traditional health care. This article examines the potential for common law liability models to bridge these gaps (even on a temporary basis).
Download the paper on SSRN here.

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry

This week featured Deven McGraw, Deputy Director for Health Information Privacy at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights. Deven has been an influential figure in health law for years, both as a partner at Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP (and co-chair of its Privacy and Data Security practice) and as head of CDT’s Health Privacy Project.

twihl 5x5Our lightning round featured Nic’s takes on a recent certificate of need case, a JAMA article on high-deductible plans, and superbugs on duodenoscopes. Frank covered the NY Times’s blockbuster article on drug shortages, and Politico’s data-driven angle on Biden’s “cancer moonshot.”

We then focused on Deven’s work, covering many topics in health privacy and security. OCR hopes that its recent guidance on access to health records will empower patients. Cloud computing and the “internet of health things” are huge concerns. OCR is innovatively offering FAQ pages for developers and others on the frontlines of health care’s technological advance, and welcomes their (and your) questions!

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

Visiting Health/IP Law Professor, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

The Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law invites applications for a 2016-17 visiting assistant professor position, for one or two semesters. The position would primarily involve teaching courses in the Health Law and IP curricula and participation in the scholarly and student-centered activities organized by the law school’s Hall Center for Law and Health and its Center for Intellectual Property Law and Innovation.

Applicants should indicate what Health Law/IP courses they could offer and any additional courses they would be interested in teaching.

Please submit a letter of interest, a CV, and a list of three references to: Vice Dean Antony Page, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law at page@iu.edu  with copies to Professors Nicolas Terry, terry@iupui.edu, and Xuan-Thao Nguyen, xunguyen@iupui.edu. The closing date for applications is Friday, February 18, 2016.

We are committed to achieving excellence through intellectual diversity and strongly encourage applications from persons of color, women, persons with disabilities, the LGBT community, veterans, and members of other groups that are under-represented on university faculties. The law school is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution and offers domestic partner benefits.

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry

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This week we welcomed Jessica L. Roberts, Director of the Health Law & Policy Institute and Associate Professor of Law at the University of Houston. In 2015, she received the university-wide Teaching Excellence Award and the Provost’s Certificate of Excellence. Professor Roberts recently was named a 2018 Greenwall Faculty Scholar in Bioethics. Her research focuses on the intersection of health law and antidiscrimination law.

We started the program with a brief discussion of topics in the news, including the actuality of single-payer care in Britain and the possibility of Medicare-for-All in the US. Nic brought us up to date on Postmarket Management of Cybersecurity in Medical Devices, a guidance issued by the FDA. Frank brought up some ACA hiccups, including employees’ (failed) resistance to expanding wellness programs, and the rather startling statistic that 56% of Humana’s in-network hospitals have no in-network emergency physicians.

Jessica then led our discussion of her article (with Nicole Huberfeld), Health Care and the Myth of Self-Reliance, and her article (with Elizabeth Weeks Leonard) What Is and Isn’t Healthism. Each article addresses deep issues of distributive justice theory and anti-discrimination principles, as well as practical problems confronting HR and compliance departments.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw

‘The Week in Health Law’ Podcast

By Nicolas Terry

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This week, we interviewed Guian McKee, an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the University of Virginia. Guian received a Ph.D. in American history at the University of California, Berkeley in May 2002. His research interests include U.S. social policy history and urban history. He is the author of The Problem of Jobs: Liberalism, Race, and Deindustrialization in Philadelphia, published in November 2008 by the University of Chicago Press. He also recently published an article in the Washington Post on the political economy of health in Baltimore.

Nic and Frank began with a discussion of the FTC’s Big Data report. We also discussed developments in Medicaid policy in Kentucky and other states, and the politicization of meaningful use.

Our discussion with Guian questioned some conventional narratives about health care costs. Frank discussed the hidden costs of health care cost-cutting, and Guian confirmed that “med and eds” have been at the center of many urban policy proposals in the wake of deindustrialization. Nic and Guian discussed the importance of addressing overutilization. And the conversation ended on a hopeful note about automation complementing, rather than replacing, human professionals.

The Week in Health Law Podcast from Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry is a commuting-length discussion about some of the more thorny issues in Health Law & Policy. Subscribe at iTunes, listen at Stitcher RadioTunein and Podbean, or search for The Week in Health Law in your favorite podcast app. Show notes and more are at TWIHL.com. If you have comments, an idea for a show or a topic to discuss you can find us on twitter @nicolasterry @FrankPasquale @WeekInHealthLaw