Harvard Grad Students: Apply Now! Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship, 2017 – 2018

PFC_Logo_300x300The Center and Student Fellowship

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics is an interdisciplinary research program at Harvard Law School dedicated to the scholarly research of important issues at the intersection of law and health policy, including issues of health care financing and market regulation, biotechnology and intellectual property, biomedical research, and bioethics. The Student Fellowship Program is designed to support closely-mentored student research in these areas. For more information on our recent fellows and their work, see our website and check out profiles of some of our past Fellows in the PFC Spotlight.

Eligibility

The student fellowship program is open to all Harvard graduate students who will be enrolled at the University during the fellowship year and who are committed to undertaking a significant research project and fulfilling other program requirements. Although the fellowship is open to all graduate students, including those in one-year programs, we encourage those who are in multi-year programs to wait until after their first year to apply. Continue reading

Most-Cited Health Law Scholars (with an update on multiple authors)

By Mark A. Hall and I. Glenn Cohen

Based on the law faculty citation analysis done by Greg Sisk, Brian Leiter has compiled “most-cited” rankings of tenured law faculty in a number of different subject areas, but not health law.  Naturally, we would be curious to know how we and colleagues might show up in such a ranking, but more than this, we were curious how the field of Health Law as a whole would look, compared to other fields, and how well different component of health law might be reflected.  Health law (as many people conceive it) is a broad field that includes bioethics, biotechnology, medical malpractice, health care finance and regulation, health policy, and public health.

Using Leiter’s methods and the Sisk data (supplemented as noted below), we compiled a citation-count ranking of health law scholars over the five-year period 2010-2014 (which is the latest currently available from Sisk).  We classify faculty as health law scholars if publications in this field account for the bulk (roughly 2/3) of their more recent citations.  A research librarian at Wake Forest University supplemented the Sisk data by doing citation counts (using his same methods) for an additional two dozen prominent health law scholars who are not on the Sisk list because they are at lower-ranked schools (below the top 70) or are based at schools of medicine or public health.  To ensure maximum comparability between these rankings and those already existing for other legal fields we conformed to Leiter’s presentation, which entailed, among other things, rounding citations to the nearest ten and estimating the age of those ranked.  Continue reading

Most-Cited Health Law Scholars (with an update on multiple authors)

By Mark A. Hall and I. Glenn Cohen

Based on the law faculty citation analysis done by Greg Sisk, Brian Leiter has compiled “most-cited” rankings of tenured law faculty in a number of different subject areas, but not health law.  Naturally, we would be curious to know how we and colleagues might show up in such a ranking, but more than this, we were curious how the field of Health Law as a whole would look, compared to other fields, and how well different component of health law might be reflected.  Health law (as many people conceive it) is a broad field that includes bioethics, biotechnology, medical malpractice, health care finance and regulation, health policy, and public health.

Using Leiter’s methods and the Sisk data (supplemented as noted below), we compiled a citation-count ranking of health law scholars over the five-year period 2010-2014 (which is the latest currently available from Sisk).  We classify faculty as health law scholars if publications in this field account for the bulk (roughly 2/3) of their more recent citations.  A research librarian at Wake Forest University supplemented the Sisk data by doing citation counts (using his same methods) for an additional two dozen prominent health law scholars who are not on the Sisk list because they are at lower-ranked schools (below the top 70) or are based at schools of medicine or public health.  To ensure maximum comparability between these rankings and those already existing for other legal fields we conformed to Leiter’s presentation, which entailed, among other things, rounding citations to the nearest ten and estimating the age of those ranked.  Continue reading

TOMORROW (4/18)! Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond – Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

NEW EVENT: Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond imageHealing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond: Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

April 18, 2017 4:00pm screening; 5:30pm panel discussion

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Join us for a film screening and panel discussion on challenges that arise from tragic acts of community violence. The event will begin with a screening of Newtown, a documentary examining the impact of the mass shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012. The screening will be followed by a panel of experts in health law policy, the neurobiology of trauma, and community approaches to violence in a discussion of public health, gun violence, and responses to community trauma. Discussion will highlight the issue of “healing the helpers”—the first responders, medical staff, clergy, mental health providers, and others who respond to the needs of victims, families, and communities in the wake of community violence.

Welcome

  • Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Panelists

  • Michelle Bosquet Enlow, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School and Associate in Psychology, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Rufus J. Faulk, Program Director, Gang Mediation Initiative, Boston TenPoint Coalition
  • Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law, Director of the Center for Health Policy and Law, and Associate Dean for Interdisciplinary Education and Research Support, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
  • Moderator: Ahmed Ragab, Richard T. Watson Associate Professor of Science and Religion and Director, Science, Religion, and Culture Program, Harvard Divinity School

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. Cosponsored by William James College and the Science, Religion, and Culture Program at Harvard Divinity School.

DTC Genetic Risk Reports Back on Market

By Kayte Spector-Bagdady, JD, MBE & Michele Gornick, PhD, MA

On Thursday, April 6th, the FDA announced that it will allow the direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing company 23andMe to market “Genetic Health Risk” (GHR) tests for 10 diseases or conditions including early-onset Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases. This is in addition to 23andMe’s current offering of ancestry, wellness (e.g., lactose intolerance), trait (e.g., hair color), and autosomal recessive carrier screening (e.g., sickle cell anemia) test reports.

The decade since 23andMe entered the market has been a regulatory labyrinth of twists and turns. But what direction are we headed now?

The way we were

23andMe was a pioneer of the field, entering the DTC genetics market in 2007 with a product offering 13 health-related reports for $999. By December 2013, it was offering more than 250 reports; including carrier status, drug response, and over 100 GHRs. In response to a set of FDA Untitled Letters that went out in 2010, 23andMe filed for de novo 510(K) premarket clearance for some tests… but also concurrently marketed them in a national television and web campaign. Continue reading

Medical Records and the NFL Combine

This post is part of our Blog Symposium “Applying the Americans with Disabilities Act and Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act to the NFL Workplace.” Background on the symposium and links to other blog posts are here

By Jessica L. Roberts

In our recent law review article, published by the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, my co-authors and I explore exactly what kinds of player health data the NFL and its Clubs can lawfully obtain from NFL hopefuls, as well as from current players.  While the Clubs and the NFL have strong interests in accessing all kinds of information about players, current federal employment laws—mainly the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act—limit the collection of employee health data.  Significantly, these statutes not only restrict how an employer can use its employees’ health data.  They also restrict the ability of the employer to even ask.  Among the major takeaways of our paper was that, via National Football Scouting, the NFL and its Clubs may be violating these laws with the interviews and medical examinations that take place during the National Scouting Combine.  Our article focused primarily on evaluative technologies: things like physicals, athletic drills, wearables, ingestibles, and genetic tests.  But what about when the source of the player health data is not a technique or technology but rather simply a medical record?  In this blog post, I take a closer look at how the ADA and GINA apply to requests for medical records.

Medical Waivers at the Combine

As explored in-depth in a recent installment of this blog symposium, prospective players are particularly vulnerable because they are not yet members of the NFL Players Association (NFLPA), and thus cannot reap the benefits of the collective bargaining agreements it negotiates.  The inferior bargaining position of aspiring players is particularly apparent considering the medical waivers they sign to even participate in the Combine.  One waiver authorizes a mind-bogglingly long list of parties—including health care providers, physicians, mental health professionals, hospitals, schools, student health services, and former trainers and teams, even at the amateur level—to release and to discuss the players’ medical records with an equally long list of potential recipients—including National Football Scouting, the NFL and all its Clubs, their representatives, agents, medical staff, team physicians, and trainers, in addition to third-party physicians.  The player consents to share: Continue reading

TOMORROW (4/5)! Crowdfunding Medical Care: Identifying Ethical Implications

April 5, 2017 12:30 PM 
Tosteson Medical Education Center, Room 227
Harvard Medical School, 260 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Please present a Harvard or other photo ID in order to enter the HMS campus. Register here.

Crowdfunding for medical care—seeking financial contributions from a large number of donors, often via social networks, to pay medical expenses—is growing in popularity in both the US and Canada. While the practice can have tangible benefits for some patients, it also raises challenging ethical and equity questions at the social level and for individual donors and campaigners. In this lecture, Professor Valorie Crooks will examine some of these questions, identify important directions for ethics-focused research, and discuss what we know about the medical expenses people are seeking to have covered.

Valorie Crooks, PhD, is a Full Professor and health geographer at Simon Fraser University (Canada). She holds the Canada Research Chair in Health Service Geographies and a Scholar Award from the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research. She has authored more than 150 articles, chapters, and commentaries and leads a well funded research program that examines health care mobility and access.

Responding: I. Glenn Cohen, JDProfessor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, the Petrie-Flom Center.

This event is free and open to the public and lunch will be provided, but seating is limited and registration is required. A Harvard or other photo ID to enter the HMS campus. Please register here.

Sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund at Harvard University.

EVENT (4/18)! Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond – Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

NEW EVENT: Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond imageHealing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond: Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

April 18, 2017 4:00pm screening; 5:30pm panel discussion

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Join us for a film screening and panel discussion on challenges that arise from tragic acts of community violence. The event will begin with a screening of Newtown, a documentary examining the impact of the mass shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012. The screening will be followed by a panel of experts in health law policy, the neurobiology of trauma, and community approaches to violence in a discussion of public health, gun violence, and responses to community trauma. Discussion will highlight the issue of “healing the helpers”—the first responders, medical staff, clergy, mental health providers, and others who respond to the needs of victims, families, and communities in the wake of community violence.

Welcome

  • Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Panelists

  • Michelle Bosquet Enlow, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School and Associate in Psychology, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Rufus J. Faulk, Program Director, Gang Mediation Initiative, Boston TenPoint Coalition
  • Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law, Director of the Center for Health Policy and Law, and Associate Dean for Interdisciplinary Education and Research Support, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
  • Moderator: Ahmed Ragab, Richard T. Watson Associate Professor of Science and Religion and Director, Science, Religion, and Culture Program, Harvard Divinity School

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. Cosponsored by William James College and the Science, Religion, and Culture Program at Harvard Divinity School.

PANEL MONDAY (4/3)! Opiate Regulation Policies – Balancing Pain and Addiction

Opiate Regulation Policies: Balancing Pain and Addiction 

April 3, 2017 12:00 PM

Austin Hall, West Classroom (111)
Harvard Law School, 1515 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Description

The current opiate epidemic has spurred long-overdue scrutiny on the pharmaceutical production and distribution of opiate medication, but it also raises questions of public policy and law regarding the regulation of medical access to and use of opiate medications with high potential for addiction. Expert panelists will address the challenges that arise from efforts to balance restrictions on access to opiates to limit addiction while also preserving sufficient access for legitimate medical management of pain.

Panelists

  • Monica Bharel, MD, MPH, Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Public Health
  • David Borsook, MD, PhD, Professor in Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical School; co-director, Center for Pain and the Brain at Boston Children’s Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, and McLean Hospital; and affiliated faculty, Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Rita Nieves, Deputy Director, Boston Public Health Commission
  • Moderator: Amanda C. Pustilnik, JDProfessor of Law, University of Maryland Carey School of Law; affiliated faculty, Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital; and 2014-2015 Senior Fellow in Law and Applied Neuroscience as part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided.

Learn More

Check out the new EdX course “The Opioid Crisis in America,” developed by faculty at Harvard Medical School, to learn more about opioid addiction, evidence-based treatment models, harm reduction approaches that law enforcement and public health officials are using to reduce opioid overdose deaths, and non-opioid alternatives for medical pain management. This online course is free and self-paced; the first session will be available online on March 27, 2017.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

What Happens Next for the ACA?

Cross-posted from the Take Care blog.

By Rachel Sachs and Nick Bagley

In his speech after withdrawing the Republican health care bill from consideration on Friday, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan said that “Obamacare is the law of the land” and will remain so “for the foreseeable future.”  But law professors who have followed the Affordable Care Act (ACA) for the past seven years ago know that its future is not yet secure.  President Trump has said that “the best thing we can do politically speaking is let Obamacare explode,” and there’s a lot he can do to make that explosion a reality.

It doesn’t have to come to that.  Contrary to GOP reports, the ACA is not collapsing.  The Medicaid expansion will continue chugging along and we’re even seeing other states—Kansas and North Carolina most recently—move toward their own expansions.  The individual markets in some states are fragile, but they are not in a death spiral.  As the Congressional Budget Office noted in its first score of the GOP bill just two weeks ago, the marketplaces would “probably be stable in most areas” under current law.

Without question, however, President Trump and HHS Secretary Price have the ability to radically destabilize the individual marketplace.  The only question is whether they attempt to do so through active sabotage, incompetence, or purposeful ambivalence.

Continue reading

No Seat at the Table: The Legal Status of Players at the NFL Scouting Combine

This post is part of our Blog Symposium “Applying the Americans with Disabilities Act and Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act to the NFL Workplace.” Background on the symposium and links to other blog posts are here

By Michael McCann

In Evaluating NFL Player Health and Performance: Legal and Ethical Issues 165 U. Pa. L. Rev. 227 (2017), the authors (Jessica L. Roberts, I. Glenn Cohen, Christopher R. Deubert and Holly Fernandez Lynch) compellingly explain why the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act supply legal protections to football players at the NFL Scouting Combine (“Combine”). In this blog post, I stress the need for such protections in light of the unusual—and vulnerable—legal status of players at the Combine.

The Combine and its relationship to the NFL Draft

Held in late February and early March, the Combine is the annual scouting spectacle for NFL teams. Over seven days, NFL teams evaluate college football players who are eligible for the NFL Draft. The NFL Draft, of course, is the exclusive method of entry for players into the NFL: only players who are either drafted or who are exposed to NFL Draft and not selected are eligible to play in the NFL.

Held each April, the NFL Draft is ostensibly designed to promote parity in the NFL. For teams that fail to make the playoffs, draft order is based on inverse order of teams’ records. This means that the very worst team obtains the first overall pick and thus the chance to draft the best available player. Continue reading

JOB OPPORTUNITY: The Petrie-Flom Center is searching for a new Executive Director!

PFC Logo-New-Horizontal_slideExecutive Director

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics

Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA

Learn more and apply now online!

Duties & Responsibilities

The Executive Director works in partnership with the Faculty Director on strategic planning and vision for the Center, and oversees the Center’s staff, activities, and collaborations, including sponsored research, fundraising, events and conferences, publications, programs for students, administration, finance, communications, and other programmatic activities.  S/he also engages in independent scholarly activities, including research and writing, lecturing, and occasional teaching, as appropriate.

Essential Functions

The Executive Director works with the Faculty Director and independently to build the Center and advance its public profile and impact among policymakers, academics, practitioners, and students.  Primary responsibilities include:

Continue reading

TOMORROW (3/23)! The Affordable Care Act: Past, Present and Future – A lecture by William B. Schultz, General Counsel of HHS, 2011-2016

17-03-23-aca-past-present-future-visixThe Affordable Care Act: Past, Present and Future – A lecture by William B. Schultz, General Counsel of HHS, 2011-2016

March 23, 2017 4:00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Enacting universal healthcare was a 65 year project, which cost two Presidents control of Congress and jeopardized their chance for reelection. From the time the Affordable Care Act was enacted in 2010 to the end of President Obama’s second term, its repeal was the number one priority of the Republicans in Washington, and it was deeply unpopular across the nation. Now that the Republicans have control of all branches of government, the repeal agenda is complicated by the new support for the law by voters and some Republican governors. This lecture will discuss the complicated politics surrounding the Affordable Care Act and the policy options for the future.

Speakers

Continue reading

REGISTER NOW (4/5)! Crowdfunding Medical Care: Identifying Ethical Implications

April 5, 2017 12:30 PM 
Tosteson Medical Education Center, Room 227
Harvard Medical School, 260 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Please present a Harvard or other photo ID in order to enter the HMS campus. Register here.

Crowdfunding for medical care—seeking financial contributions from a large number of donors, often via social networks, to pay medical expenses—is growing in popularity in both the US and Canada. While the practice can have tangible benefits for some patients, it also raises challenging ethical and equity questions at the social level and for individual donors and campaigners. In this lecture, Professor Valorie Crooks will examine some of these questions, identify important directions for ethics-focused research, and discuss what we know about the medical expenses people are seeking to have covered.

Valorie Crooks, PhD, is a Full Professor and health geographer at Simon Fraser University (Canada). She holds the Canada Research Chair in Health Service Geographies and a Scholar Award from the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research. She has authored more than 150 articles, chapters, and commentaries and leads a well funded research program that examines health care mobility and access.

Responding: I. Glenn Cohen, JDProfessor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, the Petrie-Flom Center.

This event is free and open to the public and lunch will be provided, but seating is limited and registration is required. A Harvard or other photo ID to enter the HMS campus. Please register here.

Sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and theCenter for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund at Harvard University.

The Americans with Disabilities Act and Discrimination Based on Predictive Health Data

This post is part of our Blog Symposium “Applying the Americans with Disabilities Act and Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act to the NFL Workplace.” Background on the symposium and links to other blog posts are here

By Sharona Hoffman

The excellent article, “Evaluating NFL Player Health and Performance:  Legal and Ethical Issues,” argues that some of the existing assessments of NFL players appear to violate the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  The authors call for revisions to the ADA to clarify the statute’s applicability to professional football and the scope of permitted medical examinations under the ADA.

I would like to take the argument a step further and urge that the ADA be extended to cover employer conduct that is now outside the statutory scope but is highly relevant to athletes’ employment prospects.  Specifically, the ADA should cover discrimination based on predictions of future physical and mental impairments. Continue reading

New Blog Symposium! Applying the Americans with Disabilities Act and Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act to the NFL Workplace

By Christopher R. Deubert

In recent years, there has been a growing amount of attention to different types of technologies (wearable and otherwise) that can measure various health- and performance-related metrics for athletes (see here, here, here, here, and here).  While no categorization is perfect, these technologies generally fall into eight categories: (1) player tracking, (2) heart rate, (3) sleep, (4) readiness, (5) body temperature, (6) force, (7) hydration, and (8) head impact sensors. Teams may use these technologies for evaluating and improving player performance, as well as for preventing or minimizing injury.

These new technologies are exciting, but they also raise concerns about how the data they generate might be used unfavorably towards players. For example, a team might discover that a player is no longer creating the same amount of force as he used to, which could threaten the player’s status with the team.

It was these types of concerns that led our team – Jessica L. Roberts, I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, and me – to conduct an analysis of potential legal concerns related to these technologies, as well as other health and performance evaluations of NFL players, in our recent article, Evaluating NFL Player Health and Performance: Legal and Ethical Issues (165 U. Penn. L. Rev. 227, Jan. 2017).*  Specifically, we focused on the application of two federal employment antidiscrimination statutes: the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) to the NFL workplace. Continue reading

What Does It Mean to Be a Just Institution?

[Cross-posted from the Public Health Post Blog, where it originally appeared on March 17, 2017.] 

By Lauren Taylor  

The Trump administration is prompting many of us in health services to ask new questions about if, and how, to draw lines between our personal and professional endeavors. Do we sign that petition with our institutional affiliation? Do we retweet that tweet? Do we share news of that protest on the established mailing list? As someone who studies organizational ethics, these individual-level questions soon give way to a larger set of questions about the roles and responsibilities of the institutions within which we spend so much of our professional lives. In a moment in which the role of institutions appears critically important, what does it mean to be a just institution?

Recently, local leaders have shone light on this question. Over a weekend of protests in January, Harvard Business School faculty member Ariel Dora Stern (an expert in management of innovation in health care) imagined aloud about how to prioritize her academic responsibility to a journal and her social responsibilities to her community. The tweet accrued nearly two thousand retweets and replies from fellow faculty including “Isn’t that the truth?” and “I’m in the same boat.” One response asked whether the journal had issued a formal statement against an executive order, suggesting that if it had not, Professor Stern should no longer be willing to review. Continue reading

NEW EVENT (4/18)! Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond – Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

NEW EVENT: Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond imageHealing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond: Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

April 18, 2017 4:00pm screening; 5:30pm panel discussion

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Join us for a film screening and panel discussion on challenges that arise from tragic acts of community violence. The event will begin with a screening of Newtown, a documentary examining the impact of the mass shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012. The screening will be followed by a panel of experts in health law policy, the neurobiology of trauma, and community approaches to violence in a discussion of public health, gun violence, and responses to community trauma. Discussion will highlight the issue of “healing the helpers”—the first responders, medical staff, clergy, mental health providers, and others who respond to the needs of victims, families, and communities in the wake of community violence.

Welcome

  • Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Panelists

  • Michelle Bosquet Enlow, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School and Associate in Psychology, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Rufus J. Faulk, Program Director, Gang Mediation Initiative, Boston TenPoint Coalition
  • Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law, Director of the Center for Health Policy and Law, and Associate Dean for Interdisciplinary Education and Research Support, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
  • Moderator: Ahmed Ragab, Richard T. Watson Associate Professor of Science and Religion and Director, Science, Religion, and Culture Program, Harvard Divinity School

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. Cosponsored by William James College and the Science, Religion, and Culture Program at Harvard Divinity School.

PANEL (4/3): Opiate Regulation Policies – Balancing Pain and Addiction

Opiate Regulation Policies: Balancing Pain and Addiction 

April 3, 2017 12:00 PM

Austin Hall, West Classroom (111)
Harvard Law School, 1515 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Description

The current opiate epidemic has spurred long-overdue scrutiny on the pharmaceutical production and distribution of opiate medication, but it also raises questions of public policy and law regarding the regulation of medical access to and use of opiate medications with high potential for addiction. Expert panelists will address the challenges that arise from efforts to balance restrictions on access to opiates to limit addiction while also preserving sufficient access for legitimate medical management of pain.

Panelists

  • Monica Bharel, MD, MPH, Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Public Health
  • David Borsook, MD, PhD, Professor in Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical School; co-director, Center for Pain and the Brain at Boston Children’s Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, and McLean Hospital; and affiliated faculty, Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Rita Nieves, Deputy Director, Boston Public Health Commission
  • Moderator: Amanda C. Pustilnik, JDProfessor of Law, University of Maryland Carey School of Law; affiliated faculty, Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital; and 2014-2015 Senior Fellow in Law and Applied Neuroscience as part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided.

Learn More

Check out the new EdX course “The Opioid Crisis in America,” developed by faculty at Harvard Medical School, to learn more about opioid addiction, evidence-based treatment models, harm reduction approaches that law enforcement and public health officials are using to reduce opioid overdose deaths, and non-opioid alternatives for medical pain management. This online course is free and self-paced; the first session will be available online on March 27, 2017.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

THURSDAY, 3/23! The Affordable Care Act: Past, Present and Future – A lecture by William B. Schultz, General Counsel of HHS, 2011-2016

17-03-23-aca-past-present-future-visixThe Affordable Care Act: Past, Present and Future: A lecture by William B. Schultz, General Counsel of HHS, 2011-2016

March 23, 2017 4:00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Enacting universal healthcare was a 65 year project, which cost two Presidents control of Congress and jeopardized their chance for reelection. From the time the Affordable Care Act was enacted in 2010 to the end of President Obama’s second term, its repeal was the number one priority of the Republicans in Washington, and it was deeply unpopular across the nation. Now that the Republicans have control of all branches of government, the repeal agenda is complicated by the new support for the law by voters and some Republican governors. This lecture will discuss the complicated politics surrounding the Affordable Care Act and the policy options for the future.

Speakers

Continue reading