Short-Term Limited Duration Insurance Can Now Be Less Short-Term

By Rebecca Friedman

Short-term, limited-duration insurance was designed as a temporary gap-filler while a person transitions from one kind of health insurance to a different plan or coverage. In 2016, recognizing its serious limitations, an Obama Administration rule mandated that coverage of short-term, limited-duration insurance be limited to three months, including any period of renewal.

But due to a final rule in August 2018 from the Trump Administration, short-term, limited-duration insurance coverage contracts can now last as long as one day short of a year, and can last as long as three years with renewals or extensions. The Trump Administration explained in its final rule that it selected this standard to promote access to choices of health coverage and to individual health insurance coverage. The rule also acknowledged this kind of insurance may not be the most appropriate or affordable for everyone. As of Tuesday, October 2, insurers can sell these “skimpy” plans for the extended duration.

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In a Shift, Healthcare Dominates Midterm Election Campaign Ads

hand holding remote pointed at many tv screens

By Rebecca Friedman

As the November midterm elections approach, healthcare is a top focus in campaign advertising.

According to a study by the Wesleyan Media Project, which tracks television advertisements for House and Senate races by state and topic, references to healthcare increased in August. The study found that 37 percent of all ads in August for federal races mentioned healthcare,  including references to both “ACA/health reform” and the more general “healthcare,” compared to 32 percent in the period between January 1, 2017 and July 31, 2018.

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The Cry Over Fake Milk

two glasses of milk

By Rebecca Friedman

A debate has been brewing between the cattle milk industry and the plant-based milk industry (producing drinks made from ingredients such as almonds, soy, and rice), regarding what products can actually be labeled “milk.”

This has motivated the Federal Drug Administration to review how milk is defined under federal regulations, in order to protect public health and ensure that consumers are purchasing what they expect based on a product’s label.

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