TOMORROW (4/18)! Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond – Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

NEW EVENT: Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond imageHealing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond: Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

April 18, 2017 4:00pm screening; 5:30pm panel discussion

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Join us for a film screening and panel discussion on challenges that arise from tragic acts of community violence. The event will begin with a screening of Newtown, a documentary examining the impact of the mass shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012. The screening will be followed by a panel of experts in health law policy, the neurobiology of trauma, and community approaches to violence in a discussion of public health, gun violence, and responses to community trauma. Discussion will highlight the issue of “healing the helpers”—the first responders, medical staff, clergy, mental health providers, and others who respond to the needs of victims, families, and communities in the wake of community violence.

Welcome

  • Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Panelists

  • Michelle Bosquet Enlow, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School and Associate in Psychology, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Rufus J. Faulk, Program Director, Gang Mediation Initiative, Boston TenPoint Coalition
  • Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law, Director of the Center for Health Policy and Law, and Associate Dean for Interdisciplinary Education and Research Support, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
  • Moderator: Ahmed Ragab, Richard T. Watson Associate Professor of Science and Religion and Director, Science, Religion, and Culture Program, Harvard Divinity School

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. Cosponsored by William James College and the Science, Religion, and Culture Program at Harvard Divinity School.

TOMORROW (4/5)! Crowdfunding Medical Care: Identifying Ethical Implications

April 5, 2017 12:30 PM 
Tosteson Medical Education Center, Room 227
Harvard Medical School, 260 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Please present a Harvard or other photo ID in order to enter the HMS campus. Register here.

Crowdfunding for medical care—seeking financial contributions from a large number of donors, often via social networks, to pay medical expenses—is growing in popularity in both the US and Canada. While the practice can have tangible benefits for some patients, it also raises challenging ethical and equity questions at the social level and for individual donors and campaigners. In this lecture, Professor Valorie Crooks will examine some of these questions, identify important directions for ethics-focused research, and discuss what we know about the medical expenses people are seeking to have covered.

Valorie Crooks, PhD, is a Full Professor and health geographer at Simon Fraser University (Canada). She holds the Canada Research Chair in Health Service Geographies and a Scholar Award from the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research. She has authored more than 150 articles, chapters, and commentaries and leads a well funded research program that examines health care mobility and access.

Responding: I. Glenn Cohen, JDProfessor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, the Petrie-Flom Center.

This event is free and open to the public and lunch will be provided, but seating is limited and registration is required. A Harvard or other photo ID to enter the HMS campus. Please register here.

Sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund at Harvard University.

EVENT (4/18)! Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond – Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

NEW EVENT: Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond imageHealing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond: Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

April 18, 2017 4:00pm screening; 5:30pm panel discussion

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Join us for a film screening and panel discussion on challenges that arise from tragic acts of community violence. The event will begin with a screening of Newtown, a documentary examining the impact of the mass shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012. The screening will be followed by a panel of experts in health law policy, the neurobiology of trauma, and community approaches to violence in a discussion of public health, gun violence, and responses to community trauma. Discussion will highlight the issue of “healing the helpers”—the first responders, medical staff, clergy, mental health providers, and others who respond to the needs of victims, families, and communities in the wake of community violence.

Welcome

  • Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Panelists

  • Michelle Bosquet Enlow, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School and Associate in Psychology, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Rufus J. Faulk, Program Director, Gang Mediation Initiative, Boston TenPoint Coalition
  • Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law, Director of the Center for Health Policy and Law, and Associate Dean for Interdisciplinary Education and Research Support, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
  • Moderator: Ahmed Ragab, Richard T. Watson Associate Professor of Science and Religion and Director, Science, Religion, and Culture Program, Harvard Divinity School

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. Cosponsored by William James College and the Science, Religion, and Culture Program at Harvard Divinity School.

TODAY, 3/27 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Kathryn Zeiler

March 27, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Communication-And-Resolution Programs: The Numbers Don’t Add Up”

This paper is not available for download. To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.

Kathryn Zeiler is Professor of Law and Nancy Barton Scholar at the BU School of Law. Prior to joining the BU faculty, Zeiler was Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center (2003–2015). She has held visiting professorships at Harvard Law School, NYU School of Law, and Boston University School of Law. In Fall 2010 she was a Senior Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center.

Zeiler’s scholarship applies economic theory and empirical methods to the study of legal issues and research questions. Her main scholarly interests include the importation of experimental economics results and behavioral economics theories into legal scholarship, the impact of state legislative tort damages caps on the price of medical malpractice insurance premiums, the impacts of communication and resolution programs implemented by hospitals to resolve medical malpractice claims, and the role of medical malpractice insurers in patient safety.

Zeiler serves as a fellow and member of the board for the Society of Empirical Legal Studies (2015–present). She currently holds positions on the editorial board of the American Law and Economics Review and Behavioral Science and Policy. She is a member of the Max Planck Institute’s Scientific Review Board for Research on Collective Goods. She has served as a member of the board of directors of the American Law and Economics Association (2010–2012). She is a regular peer-reviewer for a number of economics journals and law and economics journals.

Her recent publications include “Against Endowment Theory: Experimental Economics and Legal Scholarship” (UCLA Law Review), “Do Damages Caps Reduce Medical Malpractice Insurance Premiums?: A Systematic Review of Estimates and the Methods Used to Produce Them” (Research Handbook on the Economics of Torts), “The Willingness to Pay-Willingness to Accept Gap, the “Endowment Effect,” Subject Misconceptions, and Experimental Procedures for Eliciting Valuations: Reply” (American Economic Review), “Cautions on the Use of Economics Experiments in Law” (Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics), and “Medical Malpractice Liability Crisis or Patient Compensation Crisis? (DePaul Law Review, Rising Stars Symposium).

REGISTER NOW (4/5)! Crowdfunding Medical Care: Identifying Ethical Implications

April 5, 2017 12:30 PM 
Tosteson Medical Education Center, Room 227
Harvard Medical School, 260 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Please present a Harvard or other photo ID in order to enter the HMS campus. Register here.

Crowdfunding for medical care—seeking financial contributions from a large number of donors, often via social networks, to pay medical expenses—is growing in popularity in both the US and Canada. While the practice can have tangible benefits for some patients, it also raises challenging ethical and equity questions at the social level and for individual donors and campaigners. In this lecture, Professor Valorie Crooks will examine some of these questions, identify important directions for ethics-focused research, and discuss what we know about the medical expenses people are seeking to have covered.

Valorie Crooks, PhD, is a Full Professor and health geographer at Simon Fraser University (Canada). She holds the Canada Research Chair in Health Service Geographies and a Scholar Award from the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research. She has authored more than 150 articles, chapters, and commentaries and leads a well funded research program that examines health care mobility and access.

Responding: I. Glenn Cohen, JDProfessor of Law, Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director, the Petrie-Flom Center.

This event is free and open to the public and lunch will be provided, but seating is limited and registration is required. A Harvard or other photo ID to enter the HMS campus. Please register here.

Sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and theCenter for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund at Harvard University.

NEW EVENT (4/18)! Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond – Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

NEW EVENT: Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond imageHealing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond: Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

April 18, 2017 4:00pm screening; 5:30pm panel discussion

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Join us for a film screening and panel discussion on challenges that arise from tragic acts of community violence. The event will begin with a screening of Newtown, a documentary examining the impact of the mass shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012. The screening will be followed by a panel of experts in health law policy, the neurobiology of trauma, and community approaches to violence in a discussion of public health, gun violence, and responses to community trauma. Discussion will highlight the issue of “healing the helpers”—the first responders, medical staff, clergy, mental health providers, and others who respond to the needs of victims, families, and communities in the wake of community violence.

Welcome

  • Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Panelists

  • Michelle Bosquet Enlow, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School and Associate in Psychology, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Rufus J. Faulk, Program Director, Gang Mediation Initiative, Boston TenPoint Coalition
  • Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law, Director of the Center for Health Policy and Law, and Associate Dean for Interdisciplinary Education and Research Support, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
  • Moderator: Ahmed Ragab, Richard T. Watson Associate Professor of Science and Religion and Director, Science, Religion, and Culture Program, Harvard Divinity School

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. Cosponsored by William James College and the Science, Religion, and Culture Program at Harvard Divinity School.

PANEL (4/3): Opiate Regulation Policies – Balancing Pain and Addiction

Opiate Regulation Policies: Balancing Pain and Addiction 

April 3, 2017 12:00 PM

Austin Hall, West Classroom (111)
Harvard Law School, 1515 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Description

The current opiate epidemic has spurred long-overdue scrutiny on the pharmaceutical production and distribution of opiate medication, but it also raises questions of public policy and law regarding the regulation of medical access to and use of opiate medications with high potential for addiction. Expert panelists will address the challenges that arise from efforts to balance restrictions on access to opiates to limit addiction while also preserving sufficient access for legitimate medical management of pain.

Panelists

  • Monica Bharel, MD, MPH, Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Public Health
  • David Borsook, MD, PhD, Professor in Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical School; co-director, Center for Pain and the Brain at Boston Children’s Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, and McLean Hospital; and affiliated faculty, Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Rita Nieves, Deputy Director, Boston Public Health Commission
  • Moderator: Amanda C. Pustilnik, JDProfessor of Law, University of Maryland Carey School of Law; affiliated faculty, Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital; and 2014-2015 Senior Fellow in Law and Applied Neuroscience as part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided.

Learn More

Check out the new EdX course “The Opioid Crisis in America,” developed by faculty at Harvard Medical School, to learn more about opioid addiction, evidence-based treatment models, harm reduction approaches that law enforcement and public health officials are using to reduce opioid overdose deaths, and non-opioid alternatives for medical pain management. This online course is free and self-paced; the first session will be available online on March 27, 2017.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

Webinars: ASPPH Two-Part Series on PHLR

CPHLR is joining forces with the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) for a free, two-part webinar series on public health law research and policy data evaluation.

Public Health Law Research Part I: Creating and Using Open-Source Policy Data for Public Health Evaluation Research
March 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Will introduce participants to the practice of Policy Surveillance and the various law and policy datasets available through LawAtlas and other open-source portals.
REGISTER >>

Public Health Law Research Part II: Developing and Implementing a Policy Evaluation Using Open-Source Legal Data
April 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Will introduce participants to the theory, design and implementation of a policy evaluation using policy surveillance datasets.
REGISTER >>

THURSDAY, 3/23! The Affordable Care Act: Past, Present and Future – A lecture by William B. Schultz, General Counsel of HHS, 2011-2016

17-03-23-aca-past-present-future-visixThe Affordable Care Act: Past, Present and Future: A lecture by William B. Schultz, General Counsel of HHS, 2011-2016

March 23, 2017 4:00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Enacting universal healthcare was a 65 year project, which cost two Presidents control of Congress and jeopardized their chance for reelection. From the time the Affordable Care Act was enacted in 2010 to the end of President Obama’s second term, its repeal was the number one priority of the Republicans in Washington, and it was deeply unpopular across the nation. Now that the Republicans have control of all branches of government, the repeal agenda is complicated by the new support for the law by voters and some Republican governors. This lecture will discuss the complicated politics surrounding the Affordable Care Act and the policy options for the future.

Speakers

Continue reading

Bold New Policies for The Brave New Biologies: IPRs and Innovation in Synthetic Biology and Gene editing

Research Seminar at the University of Copenhagen debating intellectual property and innovation in synthetic biology, systems biology & gene editing.

New technologies in biology offer a brave new world of possibilities. Promising solutions to some of the most urgent challenges faced by humanity: climate change, environmental protection, growing population, renewable energy and improved health care. Scientific and technological progress has been remarkable. Simultaneously, emerging life science technologies raise outstanding ethical, legal and social questions.

In this research seminar, Prof. Esther Van Zimmeren from the University of Antwerp joins Prof. Timo Minssen, Postdoc Ana Nordberg and Ph.D. Student Jakob Wested from the Centre for Information and Innovation Law, debating bold new policies for intellectual property law and incentive to life science innovation.

Programme

15:00 – 15:10 Welcome
Prof. Timo Minssen, CIIR, Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen.
15:10 – 15:30 Waiting for the Rumble in the Jungle: – An overview of current CRISPR/CAs9 patent disputes, central legal issues and some thoughts on conditioning the innovation system.
PhD Student Jakob Wested, CIIR, Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen.
15:30 – 15:50 From FRAND to FAIR for Synthetic and Systems Biology? The Implications of Openness, IP Strategies, Standardization and the Huawei-case.
Prof. Esther van Zimmeren, Faculty of Law, University of Antwerp.
15:50 – 16:10 Keeping up with the technologies: IP Law and Regulation in the age of gene editing.
Postdoc Ana Nordberg, CIIR, Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen.
16.10 – 17.00 Questions and panel debate

Time: 13 March 2017, 15:00 – 17:00

Venue: Meeting Room 7A-2-04 , Faculty of Law, Njalsgade 76, DK-2300 Copenhagen S

Registration:
The event is free to attend. Registration is mandatory. Please use this registration form no later than Monday, 13 March 2017, 11:00 at the latest.

Organizer: Copenhagen Biotech & Pharma Forum, at CIIR, Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen

Manufacturers Of Biosimilar Drugs Sit Out The ‘Patent Dance’

This new post by Claire Laporte appears on the Health Affairs Blog in a series stemming from the Fifth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review event held at Harvard Law School on Monday, January 23, 2017.

Believe it or not, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Obamacare, or here, ACA) has intellectual property provisions. In addition to establishing mandates, subsidies and insurance exchanges, the ACA also created a new pathway for the approval of biosimilar drugs, which are akin to generic drugs. That pathway appears in a corner of the ACA that has its own title: the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (BPCIA). The BPCIA is rich with intellectual property (IP) provisions that are now the subject of litigation in the Supreme Court.

Background: Generic Drugs And Biosimilars

Many of us take generic drugs for granted, but we have them only because the Hatch-Waxman Act (1984) provided an abbreviated pathway by which FDA could approve them. Under this pathway, a generic drug could be approved based on the safety and efficacy of the branded drug, plus a showing by the generic that it was essentially identical to the branded drug. This pathway also included provisions by which generic drug manufacturers could challenge the validity of patents protecting the branded drug. […]

Read the full post here.

TOMORROW: Critical Pathways to Improved Care for Serious Illness

Close up of helpful carer hand and happy old man

Friday, March 10, 10:30am – 2:30pm

Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East BC, 1585 Massachusetts Ave.

Join leading health care executives, experts, policymakers, and other thought leaders as they embark upon a project to develop a guiding framework for providing improved care for people with serious illness. You are invited to observe the inaugural working session where distinguished panelists will discuss innovations in program design and pathways for delivering high quality care to an aging population with chronic illnesses, especially those with declining function and complex care needs.

Check out the full agenda and list of roundtable participants on the website!

Attendees are welcome to participate in Q&A sessions, and lunch will be provided. Please RSVP for lunch here.

This project is funded by the Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation, and this convening is part of the Project on Advanced Care and Health Policy, a collaboration between the Coalition to Transform Advanced Care (C-TAC) and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. 

NEW EVENT (4/18)! Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond – Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

NEW EVENT: Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond imageHealing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond: Panel discussion and screening of the documentary Newtown (2016)

April 18, 2017 4:00pm screening; 5:30pm panel discussion

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Register for this event

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Join us for a film screening and panel discussion on challenges that arise from tragic acts of community violence. The event will begin with a screening of Newtown, a documentary examining the impact of the mass shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012. The screening will be followed by a panel of experts in health law policy, the neurobiology of trauma, and community approaches to violence in a discussion of public health, gun violence, and responses to community trauma. Discussion will highlight the issue of “healing the helpers”—the first responders, medical staff, clergy, mental health providers, and others who respond to the needs of victims, families, and communities in the wake of community violence.

Welcome

  • Martha Minow, Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Panelists

  • Michelle Bosquet Enlow, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School and Associate in Psychology, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Rufus J. Faulk, Program Director, Gang Mediation Initiative, Boston TenPoint Coalition
  • Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law, Director of the Center for Health Policy and Law, and Associate Dean for Interdisciplinary Education and Research Support, Northeastern University School of Law; Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs
  • Moderator: Ahmed Ragab, Richard T. Watson Associate Professor of Science and Religion and Director, Science, Religion, and Culture Program, Harvard Divinity School

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register here.

Part of the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. Cosponsored by William James College and the Science, Religion, and Culture Program at Harvard Divinity School.

Global Health Innovation summit in Berlin in April

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION – ‘Research for Impact’ & the G20: How can global health innovation drive sustainable development?

Date: April 28th 2017
Location: Central Berlin
Time: 10:00-17:00

The G20 has underlined its commitment to contribute to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, adopted by the United Nations in September 2015, as leaders look to cohere the related dialogues and processes into mutually beneficial and complementary projects. The 2016 G20 Action Plan on the 2030 Agenda focuses on “sectors and themes…where the G20 has comparative advantage and can add value as a global forum for economic cooperation”. Germany assumed the G20 Presidency on December 1, 2016 and has prioritized global health as an area where the G20 can make a substantial contribution to achieving the objectives of Agenda 2030.

The co-hosts invite individuals and organizations interested to participate in roundtable discussions on global health innovation in the G20 to respond to this call. Delegates are invited to participate and discuss with co-hosts, stakeholders, politicians, think tanks, NGO’s and representatives from G20 and G77 countries. Continue reading

NEW EVENT (3/23)! The Affordable Care Act: Past, Present and Future – A lecture by William B. Schultz, General Counsel of HHS, 2011-2016

17-03-23-aca-past-present-future-visixThe Affordable Care Act: Past, Present and Future: A lecture by William B. Schultz, General Counsel of HHS, 2011-2016

March 23, 2017 4:00 PM

Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Enacting universal healthcare was a 65 year project, which cost two Presidents control of Congress and jeopardized their chance for reelection. From the time the Affordable Care Act was enacted in 2010 to the end of President Obama’s second term, its repeal was the number one priority of the Republicans in Washington, and it was deeply unpopular across the nation. Now that the Republicans have control of all branches of government, the repeal agenda is complicated by the new support for the law by voters and some Republican governors. This lecture will discuss the complicated politics surrounding the Affordable Care Act and the policy options for the future.

Speakers

Continue reading

All-Payer Claims Databases After Gobeille

This new post by Gregory Curfman appears on the Health Affairs Blog in a series stemming from the Fifth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review event held at Harvard Law School on Monday, January 23, 2017.

With health care spending approaching 20 percent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), controlling health care costs is a top priority not only for the federal government, but also the individual states. To develop successful strategies for cost control, states need comprehensive data on utilization of and spending on health care services. Medicare data are valuable but not representative of the entire national population or of the prices that private payers pay. In private insurance, prices are not under administrative control as they are in Medicare, and they vary widely in different geographic regions.

All-payer claims databases (APCDs) were developed, first in Maryland in 1995, to provide comprehensive state-level data on health-care utilization and spending, and there are now 16 APCDs nationwide. As the name implies, APCDs collect data from all payers, and the spending data reflect the actual negotiated prices of services. Thus, APCDs are a valuable source of information for state health policymakers and health services researchers. For example, in Massachusetts, the Health Policy Commission uses the state’s APCD to set state-wide health care spending targets, which have been important in achieving state cost control. […]

Read the full post here!

TODAY, 3/6 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Khiara Bridges

March 6, 2017, 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104

Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation

Download the presentation: 

Note from the Presenter:

I am circulating the introductory chapter from my first ethnography, Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization, and a book proposal for my as yet untitled second ethnography.

My first book grew out of eighteen months of ethnographic fieldwork research that I conducted in the obstetrics clinic of a public hospital in New York City. I found myself in the clinic because I was interested in studying race as a process: I wanted to explore how ideas about race are made material on the bodies of poor women during the event of pregnancy. Moreover, I was curious about the role of the law in this process of race-making.

What I did not realize back when I was writing Reproducing Race was that the book would be a prelude to my second ethnography—a book about which I am now beginning to think. This ethnography will extend the analysis began in Reproducing Race to affluent women of color. Reproducing Race revealed that poor, pregnant women of color are treated in ways that are significantly different from the ways in which wealthier pregnant women are treated. But, how much of that different treatment is an effect of race? How much of it is an effect of class? By training its focus on women of color with class privilege, my second ethnography will try to figure it all out. Thus, the central preoccupation that motivates the study is the complex relationship between race and class. How does class privilege alter the experience of race? How does one’s status as a racial minority alter the experience of class privilege?

The second ethnography is very much in its earlier stages. So, any and all feedback on this project is welcome.

About the Presenter

Continue reading

March 10: Critical Pathways to Improved Care for Serious Illness

Close up of helpful carer hand and happy old man

Friday, March 10, 10:30am – 2:30pm

Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East BC, 1585 Massachusetts Ave.

Join leading health care executives, experts, policymakers, and other thought leaders as they embark upon a project to develop a guiding framework for providing improved care for people with serious illness. You are invited to observe the inaugural working session where distinguished panelists will discuss innovations in program design and pathways for delivering high quality care to an aging population with chronic illnesses, especially those with declining function and complex care needs.

Check out the full agenda and list of roundtable participants on the website!

Attendees are welcome to participate in Q&A sessions, and lunch will be provided. Please RSVP for lunch here.

This project is funded by the Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation, and this convening is part of the Project on Advanced Care and Health Policy, a collaboration between the Coalition to Transform Advanced Care (C-TAC) and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. 

Potential Changes to National Health Policy and Implications for the Healthcare Industry

Harvard Medical School’s Executive Education program invites you to join Harvard medical faculty and industry leaders to discuss potential changes in national health policy and the effects on the healthcare industry. What do we need to know? What changes are anticipated? How might industry respond? We will explain the current landscape and potential scenarios the country might face in the future.

Date: Thursday March 2nd, 2017 – 5:30pm cocktails, 6:15-8:15pm program
Location: Harvard Medical School Campus – Longwood Avenue, Boston (Room TBD)
Registration: $50 (includes parking, cocktails & hors d’oeuvres)

Register here!

Continue reading

TODAY, 2/13 at 5 PM! Health Law Workshop with Brandon Maher

February 13, 2017 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “Unlocking Exchanges”

Brendan S. Maher is a Professor of Law and the Director of the independently endowed Insurance Law Center at UConn School of Law. A graduate of Stanford University and Harvard Law School, Maher is the faculty advisor for the peer-reviewed Connecticut Insurance Law Journal and a nationally recognized expert in the regulation of insurance, pensions, and health care. He is a leading authority on the meaning of both ERISA and the Affordable Care Act. Maher also teaches and studies the procedural and evidentiary aspects of civil litigation in federal courts.

Maher is an appointed member of the Connecticut Retirement Security Board, a board created by the state legislature to develop a comprehensive proposal for the implementation of a public retirement plan. He is also the co-moderator of Connecticut’s Forum on Healthcare Innovation, a forum for scholars, investors, providers, scientists, and regulators to share ideas on optimizing health outcomes. He was the chairman of the law school’s “The Affordable Care Act Turns Five” conference, where former United States Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius was the keynote speaker.

Maher regularly appears before the United States Supreme Court to litigate cases involving employee benefits, preemption, and procedure. One of his cases, LaRue v. DeWolff, Boberg & Associates, was described by The New York Times as “one of the most important rulings in years on the meaning of the federal pension law known as ERISA.” He also studies and is routinely consulted by states, medical providers, and employee organizations as to the applicability of federal law to their activities.

Maher is licensed to practice in several state and federal courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court.