CALL FOR ABSTRACTS, DUE TODAY, 12/2! Transparency in Health and Health Care: Legal and Ethical Possibilities and Limits

Medical care prices against a white background

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is pleased to announce plans for our 2017 annual conference, entitled: Transparency in Health and Health Care: Legal and Ethical Possibilities and Limits.

Transparency is a relatively new concept to the world of health and health care, considering that just a few short decades ago we were still in the throes of a “doctor-knows-best” model. Today, however, transparency is found on almost every short list of solutions to a variety of health policy problems, ranging from conflicts of interest to rising drug costs to promoting efficient use of health care resources, and more. Doctors are now expected to be transparent about patient diagnoses and treatment options, hospitals are expected to be transparent about error rates, insurers about policy limitations, companies about prices, researchers about data, and policymakers about priorities and rationales for health policy intervention. But a number of important legal and ethical questions remain. For example, what exactly does transparency mean in the context of health, who has a responsibility to be transparent and to whom, what legal mechanisms are there to promote transparency, and what legal protections are needed for things like privacy, intellectual property, and the like?  More specifically, when can transparency improve health and health care, and when is it likely to be nothing more than platitude?

This conference, and anticipated edited volume, will aim to: (1) identify the various thematic roles transparency has been called on to play in American health policy, and why it has emerged in these spaces; (2) understand when, where, how, and why transparency may be a useful policy tool in relation to health and health care, what it can realistically be expected to achieve, and when it is unlikely to be successful, including limits on how patients and consumers utilize information even when we have transparency; (3) assess the legal and ethical issues raised by transparency in health and health care, including obstacles and opportunities; (4) learn from comparative examples of transparency, both in other sectors and outside the United States.  In sum, we hope to reach better understandings of this health policy buzzword so that transparency can be utilized as a solution to pressing health policy issues where appropriate, while recognizing its true limitations.

Call for Abstracts

We welcome submissions on both the broad conceptual questions described above and more specific policy issues, including: Continue reading

REGISTER NOW (1/23/17)! PFC’s 5th Annual Health Law Year in P/Review

The Fifth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review symposium will feature leading experts discussing major developments during 2016 and what to watch out for in 2017. The discussion at this day-long event will cover hot topics in such areas as health policy under the new administration, regulatory issues in clinical research, law at the end-of-life, patient rights and advocacy, pharmaceutical policy, reproductive health, and public health law.

This year’s Health Law Year in P/Review is sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School, Harvard Health Publications at Harvard Medical School, Health Affairs, the Hastings Center, the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) in the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund. 

Agenda Continue reading

REGISTER NOW (12/9)! Paying Research Participants: Ethical and Regulatory Parameters

Rolled up US paper banknote in a test tube rack representing the costs of medical research

Paying Research Participants: Ethical and Regulatory Parameters
December 9, 2016 8:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Milstein East ABC (2036), Wasserstein Hall
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Register for this event

Description

This symposium will bring together a variety of experts to discuss key ethical and legal questions regarding offers of payment to research participants. Panels will cover:

  • Why payment is offered to research participants
  • Regulatory parameters governing payment
  • Whether payment to research participants should be considered exceptional, compared to payment in other contexts
  • How offers of payment affect participants
  • How to define coercion and undue influence with regard to paying research participants
  • Which factors should be considered when evaluating proposed payments
  • The problem of low payment

This event is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration is required. Register now!

Working Agenda

Continue reading

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS, DUE 12/2! 2017 Annual Conference, “Transparency in Health and Health Care: Legal and Ethical Possibilities and Limits”

Medical care prices against a white background

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is pleased to announce plans for our 2017 annual conference, entitled: Transparency in Health and Health Care: Legal and Ethical Possibilities and Limits.

Transparency is a relatively new concept to the world of health and health care, considering that just a few short decades ago we were still in the throes of a “doctor-knows-best” model. Today, however, transparency is found on almost every short list of solutions to a variety of health policy problems, ranging from conflicts of interest to rising drug costs to promoting efficient use of health care resources, and more. Doctors are now expected to be transparent about patient diagnoses and treatment options, hospitals are expected to be transparent about error rates, insurers about policy limitations, companies about prices, researchers about data, and policymakers about priorities and rationales for health policy intervention. But a number of important legal and ethical questions remain. For example, what exactly does transparency mean in the context of health, who has a responsibility to be transparent and to whom, what legal mechanisms are there to promote transparency, and what legal protections are needed for things like privacy, intellectual property, and the like?  More specifically, when can transparency improve health and health care, and when is it likely to be nothing more than platitude?

This conference, and anticipated edited volume, will aim to: (1) identify the various thematic roles transparency has been called on to play in American health policy, and why it has emerged in these spaces; (2) understand when, where, how, and why transparency may be a useful policy tool in relation to health and health care, what it can realistically be expected to achieve, and when it is unlikely to be successful, including limits on how patients and consumers utilize information even when we have transparency; (3) assess the legal and ethical issues raised by transparency in health and health care, including obstacles and opportunities; (4) learn from comparative examples of transparency, both in other sectors and outside the United States.  In sum, we hope to reach better understandings of this health policy buzzword so that transparency can be utilized as a solution to pressing health policy issues where appropriate, while recognizing its true limitations.

Call for Abstracts

We welcome submissions on both the broad conceptual questions described above and more specific policy issues, including: Continue reading

Monday, 11/21, Health Law Workshop with Elizabeth Weeks Leonard

November 21, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the presentation materials: “Healthism:  Health Status Discrimination and the Law”

Elizabeth Weeks Leonard joined the Georgia Law faculty in 2011. She is currently a J. Alton Hosch Professor of Law. Her teaching and research interests include torts, health law, health care financing and regulation, and public health law.

Prior to coming to UGA, Weeks served on the faculty at the University of Kansas School of Law. During her time there, she was honored with the Howard M. and Susan Immel Award for Teaching Excellence and with the Meredith Docking Faculty Scholar Award, a university-wide honor for faculty who have distinguished themselves early in their careers. Additionally, she has served as a visiting professor at the University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law and at Georgia Law. Continue reading

REGISTER NOW (12/9)! Paying Research Participants: Ethical and Regulatory Parameters

Rolled up US paper banknote in a test tube rack representing the costs of medical research

Paying Research Participants: Ethical and Regulatory Parameters
December 9, 2016 8:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Milstein East ABC (2036), Wasserstein Hall
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Register for this event

Description

This symposium will bring together a variety of experts to discuss key ethical and legal questions regarding offers of payment to research participants. Panels will cover:

  • Why payment is offered to research participants
  • Regulatory parameters governing payment
  • Whether payment to research participants should be considered exceptional, compared to payment in other contexts
  • How offers of payment affect participants
  • How to define coercion and undue influence with regard to paying research participants
  • Which factors should be considered when evaluating proposed payments
  • The problem of low payment

This event is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration is required. Register now!

Working Agenda

Continue reading

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS, DUE 12/2! 2017 Annual Conference, “Transparency in Health and Health Care: Legal and Ethical Possibilities and Limits”

Medical care prices against a white background

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is pleased to announce plans for our 2017 annual conference, entitled: Transparency in Health and Health Care: Legal and Ethical Possibilities and Limits.

Transparency is a relatively new concept to the world of health and health care, considering that just a few short decades ago we were still in the throes of a “doctor-knows-best” model. Today, however, transparency is found on almost every short list of solutions to a variety of health policy problems, ranging from conflicts of interest to rising drug costs to promoting efficient use of health care resources, and more. Doctors are now expected to be transparent about patient diagnoses and treatment options, hospitals are expected to be transparent about error rates, insurers about policy limitations, companies about prices, researchers about data, and policymakers about priorities and rationales for health policy intervention. But a number of important legal and ethical questions remain. For example, what exactly does transparency mean in the context of health, who has a responsibility to be transparent and to whom, what legal mechanisms are there to promote transparency, and what legal protections are needed for things like privacy, intellectual property, and the like?  More specifically, when can transparency improve health and health care, and when is it likely to be nothing more than platitude?

This conference, and anticipated edited volume, will aim to: (1) identify the various thematic roles transparency has been called on to play in American health policy, and why it has emerged in these spaces; (2) understand when, where, how, and why transparency may be a useful policy tool in relation to health and health care, what it can realistically be expected to achieve, and when it is unlikely to be successful, including limits on how patients and consumers utilize information even when we have transparency; (3) assess the legal and ethical issues raised by transparency in health and health care, including obstacles and opportunities; (4) learn from comparative examples of transparency, both in other sectors and outside the United States.  In sum, we hope to reach better understandings of this health policy buzzword so that transparency can be utilized as a solution to pressing health policy issues where appropriate, while recognizing its true limitations.

Call for Abstracts

We welcome submissions on both the broad conceptual questions described above and more specific policy issues, including: Continue reading

TOMMOROW (11/16)! Book Launch: Nudging Health – Health Law and Behavioral Economics

display-nudging-healthBook Launch: Nudging Health – Health Law and Behavioral Economics
November 16, 2016 12:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East BC (2036)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

In November 2016, Johns Hopkins University Press will publish Nudging Health: Health Law and Behavioral Economics, co-edited by Petrie-Flom Center Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen, Executive Director Holly Fernandez Lynch, and Christopher T. Robertson, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Research and Innovation, James E. Rogers College of Law, the University of Arizona. This edited volume stems from the Center’s 2014 annual conference, which brought together leading experts to build on the success of the behavioral economics movement in order to further develop scholarly discussion of key issues in health law policy, bioethics, and biotechnology by addressing both broad conceptual questions and more specific policy applications.

Behavioral science has swept the fields of economics and law through the study of nudges, cognitive biases, and decisional heuristics—but it has only recently begun to impact the conversation on health care. Nudging Health wrestles with some of the thorny philosophical issues, legal limits, and conceptual questions raised by behavioral science as applied to health law and policy. The volume frames the fundamental issues surrounding health nudges by addressing ethical questions. Panelists will discuss some of the issues addressed in the book: Does cost-sharing for health expenditures cause patients to make poor decisions? Is it right to make it difficult for people to opt out of having their organs harvested for donation when they die? Are behavioral nudges paternalistic? The contributors examine specific applications of behavioral science, including efforts to address health care costs, improve vaccination rates, and encourage better decision-making by physicians. They wrestle with questions regarding the doctor-patient relationship and defaults in healthcare while engaging with larger, timely questions of healthcare reform.

Panelists:

Continue reading

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS, DUE 12/2! 2017 Annual Conference, “Transparency in Health and Health Care: Legal and Ethical Possibilities and Limits”

Medical care prices against a white background

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is pleased to announce plans for our 2017 annual conference, entitled: Transparency in Health and Health Care: Legal and Ethical Possibilities and Limits.

Transparency is a relatively new concept to the world of health and health care, considering that just a few short decades ago we were still in the throes of a “doctor-knows-best” model. Today, however, transparency is found on almost every short list of solutions to a variety of health policy problems, ranging from conflicts of interest to rising drug costs to promoting efficient use of health care resources, and more. Doctors are now expected to be transparent about patient diagnoses and treatment options, hospitals are expected to be transparent about error rates, insurers about policy limitations, companies about prices, researchers about data, and policymakers about priorities and rationales for health policy intervention. But a number of important legal and ethical questions remain. For example, what exactly does transparency mean in the context of health, who has a responsibility to be transparent and to whom, what legal mechanisms are there to promote transparency, and what legal protections are needed for things like privacy, intellectual property, and the like?  More specifically, when can transparency improve health and health care, and when is it likely to be nothing more than platitude?

This conference, and anticipated edited volume, will aim to: (1) identify the various thematic roles transparency has been called on to play in American health policy, and why it has emerged in these spaces; (2) understand when, where, how, and why transparency may be a useful policy tool in relation to health and health care, what it can realistically be expected to achieve, and when it is unlikely to be successful, including limits on how patients and consumers utilize information even when we have transparency; (3) assess the legal and ethical issues raised by transparency in health and health care, including obstacles and opportunities; (4) learn from comparative examples of transparency, both in other sectors and outside the United States.  In sum, we hope to reach better understandings of this health policy buzzword so that transparency can be utilized as a solution to pressing health policy issues where appropriate, while recognizing its true limitations.

Call for Abstracts

We welcome submissions on both the broad conceptual questions described above and more specific policy issues, including: Continue reading

THIS AFTERNOON! (11/7): The Ethics of Early Embryo Research & the Future of the 14-Day Rule

egg cells flowing in a blue background

The Ethics of Early Embryo Research & the Future of the 14-Day Rule
November 7, 2016 3:00 – 6:30 PM
Austin Hall, North Classroom (100)
Harvard Law School, 1515 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA
 

Description

For over 35 years, the “14-Day Rule,” prohibiting in vitro experimentation on embryos beyond 14 days, has stood as an ethical line in the sand for embryo research around the world. Throughout the arc of the rule’s existence it has not been questioned, as scientists have been unable to grow embryos in vitro either up to, or beyond, 14 days; a practical limitation that served as a backstop to the ethical rule. However, in May of this year, labs in the U.S. and the U.K. were the first to report being able to sustain human embryos in vitro for up to 13 days. This development and other advances in in vitro research involving organized, embryo-like cellular structures have raised a number of questions about the rule, its genesis, application, and future scope. This conference will convene experts in bioethics, stem cell research, embryology, and law to discuss the ethical underpinnings and future scope of the rule. Questions to be discussed include:

  • What are the historical, ethical and scientific rationales for establishing the 14-Day Rule?
  • Should the 14-Day Rule be revisited in light of recent advances?
  • Should the 14-Day Rule even apply to research involving the in vitro culture of embryo-like cellular structures?

Agenda Continue reading

TOMORROW, 11/2! The 21st-Century Advanced Illness Care Team: How Team-based Care is Moving Medicine Beyond the Clinic into the Home and Community

The 21st-Century Advanced Illness Care Team: How Team-based Care is Moving Medicine Beyond the Clinic into the Home and Community
November 2, 2016 12:00 PM
Pound Hall, Room 101
Harvard Law School, 1563 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Care for advanced illness is moving beyond the hospital and physician office and into the home and community. Addressing the needs of the individual with advanced illness increasingly requires an interdisciplinary team of providers, with significant policy implications.

This panel discussion will feature voices across specialties and professions addressing clinical and policy solutions.

Speakers:

  • Cheryl Sullivan, Chief Executive Officer, American Academy of Nursing
  • Sandra Schellinger, Senior Scientist, Late Life Supportive Care Research, Allina Health System
  • Brad Stuart, Chief Medical Officer, Coalition to Transform Advanced Care
  • Ravi Parikh, Clinical Fellow, Harvard Medical School, Resident in Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Mark Sterling, Senior Fellow, Project on Advanced Care and Health Policy at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School

This event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided.

Part of the Project on Advanced Care and Health Policy, a collaboration between the Coalition to Transform Advanced Care(C-TAC) and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School focused on development and spread of effective person-centered models of advanced illness care through interdisciplinary analysis of important health law and policy issues.

NEXT WEEK (11/1): The Challenge of Protecting the Public and Promoting Innovation – Dr. Robert Califf, Commissioner, US Food & Drug Administration

robert_califfThe Challenge of Protecting the Public and Promoting Innovation: Dr. Robert Califf, Commissioner, US Food & Drug Administration
Tuesday, November 1, 2016 4:00-5:30
Harvard Kennedy School
Malkin Penthouse, 4th Floor, Littauer Building
79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA

Robert M. Califf, MD, is the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. He is committed to strengthening programs and policies that enable the agency to carry out its mission to protect and promote the public health. The FDA is responsible for protecting the public health by ensuring the safety, efficacy, and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, and medical devices; and by ensuring the safety of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation. Before joining the FDA in March 2015 as Deputy Commissioner for Medical Products and Tobacco, Dr. Califf ran the Duke Clinical Research Institute. He trained as a cardiologist.

Moderated by Amitabh Chandra, Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Sponsored by Harvard Kennedy School Healthcare Policy Program, Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, Institute of Politics

TOMORROW (10/27): Concurrent Surgeries – Medical, Legal, and Ethical Issues

concurrent_surgeriesConcurrent Surgeries – Medical, Legal, and Ethical Issues
October 27, 2016 12:00 PM
Pound Hall 101, Ballantine Classroom
Harvard Law School, 1563 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Concurrent, or overlapping, surgeries involve the simultaneous scheduling of substantial portions of two or more surgeries under the supervision of a single surgeon, requiring delegation of responsibility to trainees and assistants if necessary. The practice is not uncommon, especially at teaching hospitals, but patients often have no idea that their doctor may also be operating on someone else at the same time. This panel discussion will describe the practice, its risks and benefits, and recommended approaches to preserve patient trust and safety.

Panelists

  • Jonathan Saltzman, Reporter, The Boston Globe Spotlight Team (contributor to “Clash in the Name of Care”) – Setting the Stage: Key issues and concerns raised by concurrent surgeries, patient experiences and outcomes
  • Griffith R. Harsh IV, MD, MA, MBA, FACS, Professor of Neurosurgery and Associate Dean, Postgraduate Medical Education, Stanford University – Surgeon’s Perspective: Pros and cons of concurrent scheduling, pressures to schedule this way, potential impact on patients, and the recent statement by the American College of Surgeons
  • I. Glenn Cohen, JD, Professor, Harvard Law School; Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center – Legal and ethical perspectives: Institutional risk, medical malpractice, informed consent, and applicable regulations
  • Moderator: Robert Truog, MD, Frances Glessner Lee Professor of Medical Ethics, Anaesthesia, & Pediatrics and Director, Center for Bioethics, Harvard Medical School; Executive Director, Institute for Professionalism & Ethical Practice and Senior Associate in Critical Care Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital

Sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and theCenter for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund.

Monday, 10/24, HLS Health Law Workshop with Lindsay Wiley

October 24, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Social Norms, Legal Foundations, and Noncommunicable Disease Prevention”

To request a copy of the paper in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich@law.harvard.edu.

Lindsay Wiley is Associate Professor of Law at the Washington College of Law at American University. She teaches torts, health law, and public health law. Her research focuses on access to health care and healthy living conditions in the U.S. and globally. She serves on the Board of Directors of the American Society for Law, Medicine, and Ethics and the National Conference of Lawyers and Scientists. Prior to joining the faculty at WCL, Professor Wiley was the Global Health Law Program Director at the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University. She had also previously worked at the Center for Law and the Public’s Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the American Society for Law, Medicine, and Ethics, and Gordon, Feinblatt, Rothman LLC in Baltimore, MD. She received her AB and JD from Harvard, where she served on the Harvard Law Review, and her MPH from Johns Hopkins.

MONDAY (10/24): Health Care after the Election

presidential_nominees_slideHealth Care after the Election
October 24, 2016 12:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West AB (2019)
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Description

As we approach the 2016 presidential election and change of administration, there are many questions about the future of health policy that the 45th President and Congress will have to address starting in 2017. This event brings together health care experts from both sides of the aisle to discuss what health care will – and should – look like under the next administration.

Possible topics for discussion include:

  • The Affordable Care Act
  • Drug pricing
  • Delivery system reform
  • Innovation and research funding/NIH
  • Mental health
  • Public health

Continue reading

Monday, 10/17, HLS Health Law Workshop with Nicholson Price

October 17, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Presentation: “Regulating Black-Box Medicine.” To request a copy of the paper in preparation for the workshop, please email Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.

Nicholson Price is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan School of Law, where he teaches Patents, Health Law, and first-year Property, among other courses. He was previously Assistant Professor at the University of New Hampshire School of Law. From 2012 to 2014 Nicholson was an Academic Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center, where he studied innovation in the pharmaceutical industry, personalized medicine, and the issues surrounding secondary findings in genomic research. His work has been published in Science, the Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, Nature Biotechnology, the Boston College Law Review, and the Hastings Center Report, among others.

Nicholson received his JD from Columbia Law School in 2011, where he was a James Kent Scholar, was Submissions Editor of the Columbia Science and Technology Law Review, and twice received the Julius Silver Note Prize. He received his PhD in Biological Sciences, also from Columbia University, in 2010. He holds an AB in Biological Sciences from Harvard College. After law school, he clerked for Judge Carlos T. Bea of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and was a Visiting Consortium Scholar at the UCSF/UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science and Health Policy.

Monday, 9/19, HLS Health Law Workshop with Amy Sepinwall

September 19, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: “The Challenges of Conscience in a World of Compromise”

Amy Sepinwall is Assistant Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics and James G. Campbell, Jr. Memorial Term Assistant Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include individual and collective responsibility for corporate and financial wrongdoing, corporate constitutional rights, and gender and racial justice. Prior to joining the faculty at the Wharton School, she clerked for the Honorable Louis H. Pollak, Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

Sepinwall earned her PhD from Georgetown University and her JD from Yale Law School. She also holds MA and BA degrees from McGill University. From 2007 – 2008, she held a Charlotte Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship at the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.

Monday, 9/12, HLS Health Law Workshop with Patricia Zettler

September 12, 2016 5-7 PM
Hauser Hall, Room 104
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Download the Presentation: Pharmaceutical Federalism

Patricia J. Zettler is associate professor of law at Georgia State University College of Law. She has expertise in the regulation of medicine, biotechnology and biomedical research, with an emphasis on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Her research focuses on the interaction between state and federal regulation of medicine and science, the challenges that innovation poses for the FDA’s regulatory scheme, and the treatment use of experimental drugs and devices outside of clinical trials. Zettler’s scholarship has appeared or is forthcoming in various legal and medical journals, including the Indiana Law Journal, San Diego Law Review, Yale Journal of Health Policy Law and Ethics, Journal of Law and the Biosciences, Boston University International Law Journal, JAMA Internal Medicine, EMBO Molecular Medicine, and Academic Medicine. Zettler teaches Torts, Health Law: Quality & Access, and Food and Drug Law.

Before joining Georgia State Law in 2015, she was a fellow at the Center for Law and the Biosciences at Stanford Law School. Prior to her fellowship, she served as an associate chief counsel in the FDA’s Office of Chief Counsel, where she advised the FDA and the Department of Health and Human Services on various issues including drug safety, human subjects protection, expanded access to investigational drugs, over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements, prescription drug advertising and promotion, incentives for developing antibiotics and advisory committees. Continue reading

NEXT WEEK (9/7): Battling Blood in the Streets Neuroscience Panel, followed by PFC Open House

2016.09.07_battling_blood_for_printBattling Blood in the Streets: How Can Neuroscience Promote Public Health and Support Public Policy to Prevent Community Violence?
September 7, 2016 4:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Room 1010
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

 

 

IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWED BY:

15.09.07, 2016 Open House Visix2016 Petrie-Flom Center Annual Open House
September 7, 2016 5:30 PM
HLS Pub, Wasserstein Hall, 1st floor
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

 

 

Battling Blood in the Streets: How Can Neuroscience Promote Public Health and Support Public Policy to Prevent Community Violence?
Far too many people across the country are left dead, injured, or traumatized by community violence. Communities can be safer when neuroscience, public health strategies, and collective advocacy are aligned in practice and policy. What are the best next steps to fostering a broad science-informed advocacy movement to effectively address community violence? Continue reading