NEW EVENT (2/18): Assessing the Viability of FDA’s Biosimilar Pathway

16.02.18, FDA Biosimilars Pathway posterNEW EVENT: Assessing the Viability of FDA’s Biosimilar Pathway
February 18, 2016 12:00 PM
Pound Hall, Room 100
Harvard Law School
1536 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Description

The 2010 passage of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act was intended to create a pathway for the approval of biosimilar drugs, to bring to market less expensive versions of innovators’ biologic therapeutics in the same way the Hatch-Waxman Act has worked so well for FDA approval of generic small-molecule drugs. But the Act has been mired in a host of statutory, regulatory, and scientific complication and delays, and five years later, the FDA has approved just one biosimilar product.  Continue reading

Blinding as a Solution to Bias

Blinding Bias

We’re pleased to announce that a new book by Petrie-Flom Center affiliates Christopher Robertson and Aaron Kesselheim will be available this week.  The edited volume — Blinding as a Solution to Bias: Strengthening Biomedical Science, Forensic Science, and Law — grew from a 2013 conference at Harvard co-sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center.  From the fascinating history of blinding (starting in Ben Franklin’s living room to test the healing powers of Mesmerism) to the sham surgeries being used today, and the future novel uses of blinding in the courts, the book moves the debate forward.  What are the advantages and limitations of blinding compared to other solutions for biases? How can we quantify the biases in unblinded research? Can we develop new ways to blind decision-makers?  What are the ethical problems with withholding information?  Fundamentally, questions about who needs to know what open new doors of inquiry for the design of scientific research studies, regulatory institutions, and courts.  With a foreword by Larry Lessig, the book surveys the theory, practice, and future of blinding, drawing upon leading authors with a diverse range of methodologies and areas of expertise, including medicine, law, forensic sciences, philosophy, economics, psychology, sociology, and statistics.  It is available for pre-order from the publisher and Amazon.com.

NEXT WEEK (2/10) Fetal Pain: An Update on the Science and Legal Implications

fetalpain_slideFetal Pain: An Update on the Science and Legal Implications
February 10, 2016 12:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Amanda Pustilnik, JD and Maureen Strafford MD will discuss fetal pain, including advances in neuroscience and treatment and their implications for the law. Continue reading

REGISTER NOW! (3/29) The Future of Health Law and Policy: The Petrie-Flom Center’s 10th Anniversary Conference Celebration

PFC 10th Logo-Horizontal-Otlns-FnlThe Future of Health Law and Policy: The Petrie-Flom Center’s 10th Anniversary Conference Celebration
March 29, 2016 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

The Petrie-Flom Center is celebrating its first decade and kicking off the next by looking at the future of health law and policy!

Please join us as we bring together Petrie-Flom and other prominent Harvard Law School alumni to discuss major trends, developments, and open questions in the fields of health law policy, biotechnology, and bioethics. We’ll hear about the founder’s vision for the Center and the Dean’s perspective on the Center’s influence within the Harvard Law School community and beyond. Center Leadership will discuss what we have accomplished in the first ten years, and more important, our plans for the future. Alan Weil JD ’89, Editor-in-Chief of Health Affairs, will deliver the keynote address.

Agenda

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Monday, Feb. 1, Health Law Workshop with Michelle Mello

HLS Health Law Workshop: Michelle Mello

February 1, 2016 5:00 – 7:00 PM
Hauser Hall 105
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138

Presentation Title: “Reforming the Medical Liability System in New York: Outcomes of the New York State Medical Liability Reform and Patient Safety Demonstration Project.” To request a copy in preparation for the workshop, please contact Jennifer Minnich at jminnich at law.harvard.edu.

Michelle M. Mello is Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Professor of Health Research and Policy at Stanford School of Medicine. She is a leading empirical health law scholar whose research is focused on understanding the effects of law and regulation on health care delivery and population health outcomes. She holds a joint appointment at the Stanford University School of Medicine in the Department of Health Research and Policy. Continue reading

TOMORROW, 1/29! Fourth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review Symposium


MORE SEATS AVAILABLE! Fourth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review
January 29, 2016 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West AB 
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

The Fourth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review symposium will feature leading experts discussing major developments during 2015 and what to watch out for in 2016. The discussion at this day long event will cover hot topics in such areas as health insurance, health care systems, public health, innovation, and other issues facing clinicians and patients.

In addition to presenting at the conference, many of our speakers will write about their topics for a collaborative blog series that will begin in February 2016 on the Health Affairs Blog.

This year’s Health Law Year in P/Review is sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School, the New England Journal of MedicineHealth Affairs, the Hastings CenterHarvard Health Publications at Harvard Medical School, and the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund at Harvard University.

Agenda Continue reading

Latest News from the Petrie-Flom Center!

Check out the January 22nd edition of the Petrie-Flom Center’s biweekly e-newsletter for the latest on events, affiliate news and scholarship, and job and fellowship opportunities in health law policy and bioethics.

Featured in this edition:


UPDATED AGENDA: Fourth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review
January 29, 2016 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C 
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

The Fourth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review symposium will feature leading experts discussing major developments during 2015 and what to watch out for in 2016. The discussion at this day long event will cover hot topics in such areas as health insurance, health care systems, public health, innovation, and other issues facing clinicians and patients.

In addition to presenting at the conference, many of our speakers will write about their topics for a collaborative blog series that will begin in February 2016 on the Health Affairs Blog.

Continue reading

Four Key Issues In Health Law That Are As Relevant As Ever In 2016

Petrie-Flom’s Executive Director Holly Fernandez Lynch has a new post over at the Health Affairs Blog as the first entry in a series that will stem from our Fourth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review conference, to be held at Harvard Law School on Friday, January 29, 2016.

In it, Holly takes stock of which major issues in health law policy remain outstanding from years past, and which are coming down the pike, including:

  • The ACA (and the contraceptives coverage mandate, in particular)
  • The state of health care reform generally
  • Efforts to control health care costs
  • Emerging regulatory pathways to speed patient access to new products
  • And more…

Read the full post here.

TOMORROW, 1/20! A Conversation with Margaret A. Hamburg, FDA Commissioner 2009-2015

A Conversation with Margaret A. Hamburg, FDA Margaret Hamburg, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), speaks during an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, May 28, 2014. A new program that lets drugmakers move more quickly through the approval process for breakthrough products may help lower the cost of life-saving treatments, Hamburg, the nation's chief drug regulator, said today. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty ImagesCommissioner 2009-2015
January 20, 2016 12:30 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC (2nd floor)
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Please join the Petrie-Flom Center for a conversation with former FDA Commissioner (and former New York City Health Commissioner), Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg, led by Peter Barton Hutt, former Chief Counsel to FDA and current Senior Counsel at Covington & Burling LLP and Lecturer on Law at HLS. Topics discussed will include FDA’s role and the changing scientific, legal, political, and economic landscape; the overlap of science, innovation, and cost regarding biomedical products; food safety and nutrition; challenges of globalization, and more.

Speakers:

  • Margaret A. Hamburg, Commissioner of the U. S. Food and Drug Administration, 2009-2015
  • Peter Barton Hutt, Covington & Burling and Harvard Law School

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register now!

Sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund.

Some Commentary on How to Think About Secondary Research with Biospecimens

The public comment period on the NPRM to revise the Common Rule has just closed, and now we wait to see what happens (if anything), and when.  One of the most controversial proposals in the NPRM would require at least broad consent for secondary research with biospecimens (i.e., research on specimens originally collected for another purpose, either clinical care or a different study), regardless of whether those specimens retain identifiers.  This is a substantial change from the status quo, which does not require consent for such research with de-identified specimens.  How should we feel about this status quo, and the proposed change?  My own view is that it’s really not so bad: the risks to individual research participants are quite low, and the current approach facilitates critically important scientific advancement.  There is certainly room for improvement, e.g., to impose punishment on those who would act to re-identify de-identified specimens without permission, to inform the public that such research takes place, and to educate them about its value, perhaps allowing those who still feel very strongly that they prefer not to be included an opportunity to opt-out.  But what has been actually proposed has more problems than what it would replace, and in fact, wouldn’t solve some of those it seems to be a response to.

Rebecca Skloot feels otherwise.  She is the author of a book called The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, which chronicles the origin of one particularly important cell line – HeLa  – derived from cells that had been excised from Ms. Lacks in the course of a 1951 surgery to treat her cancer, and later used for research without her knowledge or permission.  Ms. Lacks was poor, uneducated, and black, and her descendants have also faced more than their fair share of adversity.  Ms. Skloot paints a compelling story of exploitation, but in my opinion, it is much more effective as a narrative about the horrible and enduring legacy of racism in this country than as proof that researchers who conduct secondary research with biospecimens without consent (as permitted under the current regulations, remember) or even without profit-sharing have behaved badly. After all, if individual risks are low and social benefits high – both true – then what’s the problem?  And it is far from clear that specimen sources deserve compensation for no other reason than that their discarded material actually proves valuable to scientists.  Nonetheless, the book has been used as a rallying cry by people from all walks of life who believe that they should be allowed to control whether, and potentially how, their specimens are used for research. Indeed, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is probably the single most important development that pushed the proposed revisions to the Common Rule forward, for the first time since they were released in 1991.

Continue reading

UPDATED AGENDA: Fourth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review, January 29!


UPDATED AGENDA: Fourth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review
January 29, 2016 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C 
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

The Fourth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review symposium will feature leading experts discussing major developments during 2015 and what to watch out for in 2016. The discussion at this day long event will cover hot topics in such areas as health insurance, health care systems, public health, innovation, and other issues facing clinicians and patients.

In addition to presenting at the conference, many of our speakers will write about their topics for a collaborative blog series that will begin in February 2016 on the Health Affairs Blog.

This year’s Health Law Year in P/Review is sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School, the New England Journal of MedicineHealth Affairs, the Hastings CenterHarvard Health Publications at Harvard Medical School, and the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund at Harvard University.

Agenda Continue reading

1/20/16: Register Now! A Conversation with Margaret Hamburg, FDA Commissioner 2009-2015

A Conversation with Margaret A. Hamburg, FDA Margaret Hamburg, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), speaks during an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, May 28, 2014. A new program that lets drugmakers move more quickly through the approval process for breakthrough products may help lower the cost of life-saving treatments, Hamburg, the nation's chief drug regulator, said today. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty ImagesCommissioner 2009-2015
January 20, 2016 12:30 PM
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC (2nd floor)
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Please join the Petrie-Flom Center for a conversation with former FDA Commissioner (and former New York City Health Commissioner), Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg, led by Peter Barton Hutt, former Chief Counsel to FDA and current Senior Counsel at Covington & Burling LLP and Lecturer on Law at HLS. Topics discussed will include FDA’s role and the changing scientific, legal, political, and economic landscape; the overlap of science, innovation, and cost regarding biomedical products; food safety and nutrition; challenges of globalization, and more.

Speakers:

  • Margaret A. Hamburg, Commissioner of the U. S. Food and Drug Administration, 2009-2015
  • Peter Barton Hutt, Covington & Burling and Harvard Law School

This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required. Register now!

Sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School, with support from the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund.

Happy Thanksgiving, Bill of Health Readers

Obama_ThanksGiving_Turkey_Pardon_2009Happy Thanksgiving! Today, we want to give a big thank you to our loyal readers, dedicated bloggers, and excellent commenters. You’ve helped make Bill of Health a tremendous success, and we look forward to continuing to bring you excellent commentary and analysis on all things related to health law policy, biotechnology, and bioethics.

Enjoy the holiday with family and friends!

Monday, 11/23, HLS Health Law Workshop with Amanda Pustilnik

PustilnikHLS Health Law Workshop: Amanda Pustilnik

November 23, 2015, 5:00 PM
Lewis International Law Center, Room 214A
1557 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge MA 02138

Download the paper: “And If Your Friends Jumped Off a Bridge, Would You Do It Too?”: How Developmental Neuroscience Can Inform Regimes Governing Adolescents (co-authored with Michael N. Tennison)

Amanda C. Pustilnik is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Maryland School of Law, where she teaches Criminal Law, Evidence, and Law & Neuroscience. Her current research includes work on models of mind in criminal law, evidentiary issues presented by neuroscientific work on memory, and the role of pain in different legal domains. Prior to joining the University of Maryland, she was a Climenko fellow and lecturer on law at Harvard Law School. Before entering the legal academy, she practiced litigation with Covington & Burling and with Sullivan & Cromwell, where she focused on white collar criminal matters. Prof. Pustilnik also clerked for the Hon. Jose A. Cabranes on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. She graduated Yale Law School and Harvard College, and has been a visiting scholar at the University of Cambridge, Emmanuel College, in the History and Philosophy of Science department. Prof. Pustilnik has also worked at McKinsey & Company as a management consultant and is a member of the board of directors of the John Harvard Scholarships. In 2014-2015, Pustilnik was the inaugural Senior Fellow in Law and Neuroscience at the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain & Behavior at MGH and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

Monday, 11/16, HLS Health Law Workshop with Seema Shah

HLS Health Law Workshop: Seema Shah

November 16, 2015, 5:00 PM
Lewis International Law Center, Room 214A
1557 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge MA 02138

Download the paper: “Uncertainty and the Eighth Amendment”

Seema Shah is a faculty member in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Department of Bioethics and has a joint appointment at the Division of AIDS. Her research focuses on the ethics of international research, the ethics of research with children, and the intersection of law and bioethics. She currently serves as a consultant for the Division of AIDS on its clinical sciences review committee and as an ethics consultant for the Clinical Center.

She earned her bachelor’s and juris doctor degrees from Stanford University. She previously served as a federal law clerk in the Eastern District of California and a predoctoral fellow in the NIH Department of Bioethics.

She has lectured on the ethics of clinical research at conferences run by PRIM&R, ASBH, IAB, ASTMH, and internationally in such locations as Botswana, South Africa, Vietnam, Japan, Indonesia, and Mali.

Lecture Tomorrow, 11/10! Euthanasia in Belgium: The most recent legal developments and policy challenges

Euthanasia in Belgium: The most recent legal developments and policy challenges
November 10, 2015 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM

Conference Room, 1st floor
Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School
641 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA [Map]

A lecture by Sigrid Sterckx, Professor of Ethics and Political and Social Philosophy, Ghent University, Belgium; End-of-Life Care Research Group, Vrije Universiteit Brussel & Ghent University, Belgium; Bioethics Institute Ghent, Ghent University, Belgium.

In 2002, euthanasia by a physician (the intentional termination of a patient’s life at his or her request) was depenalized in Belgium for adults and emancipated minors. In 2014, the law was extended to competent minors, without an age limit. The frequency of performance of euthanasia is rising very rapidly, having more than doubled in the last five years (accounting for one death in twenty, about 8 per day in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking region). Moreover, although the prevalence of euthanasia remains highest in patients with cancer, a clear shift is visible in the characteristics of patients who request euthanasia and whose requests are granted. The largest increases are among women, and those aged 80 or older, with lower education levels, and those dying in nursing homes. Continue reading

REGISTER NOW! Specimen Science: Ethics and Policy Implications Symposium, with NEW Lunchtime Talk on “Biospecimens and the NPRM”

testtube_hand_bw_slideSpecimen Science: Ethics and Policy Implications
NEW Lunchtime Talk on “Biospecimens & the NPRM”
Monday,  November 16, 2015, 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
8:30am-12:40pm: Austin Hall North (100);
12:40-5:30pm, Langdell Hall South, Room 272

Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA [Map]

Many important advances in human health depend on the effective collection, storage, use, and sharing of biological specimens and their associated data.   However, recent controversies involving specimen-based research have raised important questions about ownership, data-sharing, privacy considerations, group harms, and standards for responsible specimen stewardship.

Please join us for a symposium to discuss the key ethical and policy issues raised by genetics and other research involving human biological materials, covering the entire trajectory from specimen source to new discovery.  The experts at this day-long event will cover key topics, such as historical, legal, and international perspectives; donor attitudes, researcher perspectives, and institutional considerations; broad vs. specific informed consent; privacy, ownership, and control; use of specimens collected through mandatory newborn screening; research with discrete and insular populations; and others.  Conference papers eventually will be published as an edited volume with a major academic press.

Agenda

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TOMORROW, 11/4! Reflections in Honor of the Life and Influence of Professor Alan Wertheimer

Wertheimer_teaching_slideReflections in Honor of the Life and Influence of Professor Alan Wertheimer
November 4, 2015, 1:00 – 5:30 PM
NEW LOCATION:
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West B (2019)
Harvard Law School, 1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA [Map]

Please join us for an afternoon of reflection on the life, work, and enduring influence of Professor Alan Wertheimer (1942-2015). Professor Wertheimer was a leading philosopher of law and bioethics, making critical contributions to clinical research ethics; theories of coercion, undue influence, and exploitation; consent in a variety of contexts, and much more. This tribute event will feature leading scholars discussing and engaging with Professor Wertheimer’s many contributions, and exploring how he influenced their own work.

At the time of his death in 2015, Alan Wertheimer was Senior Research Scholar in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. Continue reading