Housing Equity Week in Review

Lots of questions and debate this week in housing equity and law. Here’s the latest for the week of February 21-27, 2017:

  • After a win for the Civil Gideon movement in New York, Next City asks if other cities could follow New York City’s lead and extend the right to counsel to low income tenants facing eviction?
  • There is a known racial wealth gap in the United States. Many attribute the wealth gap to the legacy of housing policies, such as redlining, that did not allow property of people of color to appreciate in the same manner as property of white Americans. Does that mean that today the solution to the wealth gap is in housing? Not necessarily argues Dorothy Brown of Emory University, via Forbes.
  • Diane Yentel, National Low Income Housing Coalition President and CEO, reflects on Mortgage Interest Deduction reform.
  • Bozeman, Montana cites city building and development code as a barrier to housing affordability. The debate on the effects of code continues politically, but is there evidence to back it up?
  • What does a Trump administration and large business tax cuts mean for affordable housing? Developers in California are concerned in the face of uncertainty as the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program might become less attractive to banks and investors, via the LA Times.
  • While the research community still debates the extent to which gentrification leads to displacement, a new study in Journal of Urban Health assess the health outcomes of those who stay. Analysis via CityLab, paper here.

Housing Equity Week in Review

Some interesting local-level developments in housing, equity and law last week. Here’s our round-up of the news from last week, February 6-12, 2017:

  • What would happen if we stopped thinking about our home as an investment? Conor Dougherty of the New York Times argues that if we treated houses like we treat microwaves, the economy will improve and inequality will reduce.
  • Cleveland shared its timeline for first citywide housing inspection for lead
  • New York City will devote $90 million to offer legal representation for low income tenants in housing courts. This is a big victory for the “civil Gideon” right-to-council movement, via Gothamist.
  • The US Treasury and the Tennessee Housing Development Agency come together to provide funds for first time homebuyers down payments in Nashville, via NextCity

Did we miss any big housing, law and equity stories this week? Let us know!

Housing Equity Week in Review

Last week, January 23-29, 2017, saw a mix of national and local-level housing news. Here’s our round-up for the past week:

  • Surprising some on the “Warren-wing” of the Democratic Party, Elizabeth Warren came out in support of Dr. Ben Carson as the 17th Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. In the confirmation hearing, Warren asked Carson if he can promise that no taxpayer dollar will go from HUD to developments’ of Donald Trump, then pointing out that it was a trick question since there was no financial disclosure,  no one knows exactly what how or what President Trump benefits from financially. However, due to promises to abate lead in housing and to protect from LGBTQ discrimination in housing markets, Warren decided not to stand in Carson’s way. Coverage via The Hill.
  • President Trump’s pick for Secretary Treasury, Steve Mnuchin, lied during his confirmation hearing about foreclosure practices of One West Bank while he was the chairmen and CEO, according to the Columbus Dispatch.
  • As the population ages, housing needs change. Are we keeping up with the new demand? New York Times opinion piece on the housing needs of the elderly.
  • Bay Area housing prices are going down due to building boom, via the Business Journal.
  • The National Low Income Housing Coalition released a statement in opposition of the Local Zoning Decisions Protection Act of 2017.

Did we miss anything? Let us know!

Housing Equity Week in Review

Here’s the latest in housing equity and law for the week of January 16-22, 2017:

Did we miss anything? Let us know.

Housing Equity Week in Review

We’ve rounded up the latest news from the past week, January 9-15, 2017, for housing law and equity. The HUD confirmation hearing was, of course, the biggest news, but a few other items of note:

Did we miss anything? Let us know!

Monthly Round-Up of What to Read on Pharma Law and Policy

By Ameet Sarpatwari and Aaron S. Kesselheim

Each month, members of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) review the peer-reviewed medical literature to identify interesting empirical studies, in-depth analyses, and thoughtful editorials on pharmaceutical law and policy.

Below are the papers identified from the month of July. The selections feature topics ranging from the reporting of clinical trial subgroup effects in top medical journals, to an assessment of generic drug approvals since the 1984 Hatch-Waxman Act, to the impact of proposed Medicare Part D reforms on cancer drugs. A full posting of abstracts/summaries of these articles may be found on our website.

  1. Gabler NB, Duan N, Raneses E, Suttner L, Ciarametaro M, Cooney E, Dubois RW, Halpern SD, Kravitz RL. No improvement in the reporting of clinical trial subgroup effects in high-impact general medical journals. Trials. 2016;17(1):320.
  2. Gagne JJ, Han X, Hennessy S, Leonard CE, Chrischilles EA, Carnahan RM, Wang SV, Fuller C, Iyer A, Katcoff H, Woodworth TS, Archdeacon P, Meyer TE, Schneeweiss S, Toh S. Successful comparison of US Food and Drug Administration Sentinel analysis tools to traditional approaches in quantifying a known drug-adverse event association. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2016 Jul 14. [Epub ahead of print].
  3. Gupta R, Kesselheim AS, Downing N, Greene J, Ross JS. Generic Drug Approvals Since the 1984 Hatch-Waxman Act. JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Jul 18. [Epub ahead of print].
  4. Haffner ME. The history of orphan drug regulation – US and Beyond. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2016 Jul 9. [Epub ahead of print].
  5. Hoekman J, Klamer TT, Mantel-Teeuwisse AK, Leufkens HG, De Bruin ML. Characteristics and follow-up of postmarketing studies of conditionally authorized medicines in the EU. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2016;82(1):213-26.
  6. Luo J, Kesselheim AS. Protecting Pharmaceutical Patents and Test Data: How the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Could Affect Access to Medicines in the US and Abroad. AMA J Ethics. 2016;18(7):727-35.
  7. Mailankody S, Prasad V. Implications of Proposed Medicare Reforms to Counteract High Cancer Drug Prices. JAMA. 2016;316(3):271-2.
  8. van Staa TP, Goldacre B, Buchan I, Smeeth L. Big health data: the need to earn public trust. BMJ. 2016 Jul 14;354:i3636.

Monthly Round-Up of What to Read on Pharma Law and Policy

By Ameet Sarpatwari and Aaron S. Kesselheim

Each month, members of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) review the peer-reviewed medical literature to identify interesting empirical studies, in-depth analyses, and thoughtful editorials on pharmaceutical law and policy.

Below are the papers identified from the month of July. The selections feature topics ranging from the change in industry relationships among members of academic institutional review boards over the past decade, to manufacturer delays in reporting serious and unexpected adverse events to the FDA, to drug patenting in India.  A full posting of abstracts/summaries of these articles may be found on our website.

  1. Campbell EG, Vogeli C, Rao SR, Abraham M, Pierson R, Applebaum S. Industry Relationships Among Academic Institutional Review Board Members: Changes From 2005 Through 2014. JAMA Intern Med. 2015 Jul 13. [Epub ahead of print].
  2. Eichler HG, Thomson A, Eichler I, Schneeweiss S. Assessing the relative efficacy of new drugs: an emerging opportunity. Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2015 Jul 1; 14(7):443-4.
  3. Flacco ME, Manzoli L, Boccia S, et al. Head-to-head randomized trials are mostly industry sponsored and almost always favor the industry sponsor. J Clin Epidemiol. 2015 Jul; 68(7):811-20.
  4. Gellad WF, Flynn KE, Alexander GC. Evaluation of Flibanserin: Science and Advocacy at the FDA. JAMA. 2015 Jul 6. [Epub ahead of print].
  5. Ma P, Marinovic I, Karaca-Mandic P. Drug Manufacturers’ Delayed Disclosure of Serious and Unexpected Adverse Events to the US Food and Drug Administration. JAMA Intern Med. 2015 Jul 27. [Epub ahead of print].
  6. Sampat BN, Shadlen KC. Patent watch: Drug patenting in India: looking back and looking forward. Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2015 Jul 17. [Epub ahead of print].
  7. Sharfstein JM, Kesselheim AS. The Safety of Prescription Drugs. JAMA. 2015 Jul 21; 314(3):233-4.

Check out the latest news from the Petrie-Flom Center!

PFC_Banner_DrkBlueCheck out the February 20th edition of the Petrie-Flom Center’s biweekly e-newsletter for the latest on events, affiliate news and scholarship, and job and fellowship opportunities in health law policy and bioethics.

Featured in this edition:

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Families Matter: Ethically, Legally, and Clinically

March 18 – 20, 2015
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA

We often talk, in bioethics, about individual autonomy.  Yet our most challenging ethical, legal and clinical controversies in health care often center around family roles and responsibilities: How should we handle parents’ refusals of medically recommended treatment or, conversely, parents’ requests to medicate or surgically alter their children?  What should be known, and by whom, about a child’s genome, especially when genetic information effects other family members?  What weight should be given to family interests in decisions about a child’s health care?  How should we think about 3-parent embryos? Gamete donors? Gestational mothers? What rights and responsibilities should fathers have with regard to decisions about abortion and adoption, for example, as well as health care decisions for their offspring?  Health care decisions might be messier, but maybe they would also be better if we gave more attention to family matters, and how families matter. Continue reading

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Worth Reading This Week

By Nicolas Terry

Petrie-Flom Intern’s Weekly Round-Up, 4/18-4/25

By Chloe Reichel

This Thursday the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed new regulations for the sale of e-cigarettes. These regulations would prohibit sales to minors and make health warnings on packages mandatory.

This Wednesday a law was passed in Vermont that requires the labeling of genetically modified foods. Vermont is the first state to pass such a regulation.

Estimations for state spending on Medicaid have been reduced by the Congressional Budget Office. The office is now predicting that the cost of Medicaid expansion will be $46 billion, compared with their previous estimate of $70 billion.

Researchers at King’s College London have grown human skin in the lab from stem cells. Animal rights proponents herald these developments as a potential end to testing on animals.

Sovaldi, a medication for hepatitis C that costs $1,000 for one day’s dosage, has had the most successful drug launch ever. From its FDA approval in December to March 31, its manufacturer sold $2.27 billion worth of the drug, though the drug has faced criticism for its high price.

The FDA is considering banning electrical stimulation devices, used to discourage aggressive behavior in people with disabilities. Students from the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center testified against the use of these devices, though some parents of children at the Center and administrators there defend the use of these devices.

Following an audit of Illinois Medicaid expenditures, it was found that the program paid $12 million for medical services for dead people. These findings have led some to support stricter scrutiny in determining Medicaid eligibility.

Pervasive use of pesticides and genetically modified seeds in Hawaii has led to unrest among the state’s residents. Groups have been organizing to prevent the cultivation of genetically modified crops, and in Hawaii County such a law has already been adopted.

Check out the latest news from the Petrie-Flom Center!

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Check out the April 18 edition of the Petrie-Flom Center’s biweekly e-newsletter for the latest on events, affiliate news and scholarship, and job and fellowship opportunities in health law policy and bioethics.

Petrie-Flom Intern’s Weekly Round-Up, 4/4-4/11

By Chloe Reichel

Following the release of information on Medicare billing practices, it was revealed that approximately 4,000 physicians each billed over $1 million in 2012. This data may shed light on medical billing procedures.

Despite a proposed 1.9 percent cut to the Medicare Advantage program, these cuts will not be implemented. On Monday the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced that funding to Medicare Advantage will increase by an average of .4 percent in 2015.

Though genetic testing is becoming cheaper and more accessible, many Americans refrain from getting tested. This is because the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act does not protect consumers from discrimination for life, disability, and long-term care insurance plans.

On Friday, Kathleen Sebelius, current Secretary of Health and Human Services, will resign from her role. Sebelius oversaw the oft-criticized implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Sylvia Mathews Burwell, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, has been selected by President Obama to fill the role. Burwell served in the Clinton administration, and was president of the Walmart Foundation, prior to her work with the Obama administration.

This Thursday the European Parliament debated a petition that would prevent the allocation of EU funds for research, aid, and public health programs that involve the destruction of human embryos. The petition had 1.8 million signatures, and is seen as a sign of popular support for social conservatism.

Hawaii’s extensive health system has led to excellent health outcomes for the state’s residents and the state’s budget, since the state has some of the lowest healthcare costs in the nation. Hawaii has near-universal health insurance coverage, and starting forty years ago, has required employers to provide health benefits to their employees.

On Saturday, Maryland legislators voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana. Those found in possession of less than 10 grams of marijuana will now be charged with civil fines, as opposed to criminal penalties.

Petrie-Flom Intern’s Weekly Round-Up, 3/28-4/4

By Chloe Reichel

In an attempt to increase transparency and accountability of Medicare, the Obama administration will release data about the services provided as a part of this program. The information will focus on the number and kind of services provided.

In the six months following the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, over seven million Americans signed up for insurance plans. These figures are in accordance with those estimated by congressional budget analysts.

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries has appealed a case to the Supreme Court about a generic form of its drug Copaxone. Teva is trying to keep their patent on the drug to prevent the manufacture of generics.

Judge David C. Bury, a federal judge in Tucson, will not stop the implementation of rules that restrict the usage of the abortion drug mifepristone in the state of Arizona. The legislation that restricted the usage of this drug went into effect on Tuesday.

On Monday, the last day for sign ups for health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act, hundreds of thousands attempted to register for policies. The website HealthCare.gov had some glitches on this day, including a period of a few hours in which the site failed to accept applications.

The Affordable Care Act has allowed many Americans who were previously uninsured to sign up for health insurance, leading to increased usage of health services. This is creating new stresses for small health clinics, but also providing additional funds that allow these clinics to operate.

On Thursday the FDA approved a handheld antidote for painkiller overdoses. The naloxone device, made by kaleo Inc., is called Evzio.

An ethics report was recently released on the risks of long-term space travel. The report addresses physical and psychological risks associated with space travel.

Check out the latest news from the Petrie-Flom Center!

Check out the April 4 edition of the Petrie-Flom Center’s biweekly e-newsletter for the latest on events, affiliate news and scholarship, and job and fellowship opportunities in health law policy and bioethics.

Twitter Round Up

This week’s twitter round up features a variety of topics from our contributors, from discussions about health care spending and the Affordable Care Act to articles about environmental poisoning of soldiers in Iraq.

  • Amitabh Chandra tweeted that “Healthcare spending growth hits a 10yr high… so much for ‘ACA is bending the cost curve’” and shared an article from USA Today.
  • Frank Pasquale shared a blog entry by Larry Backer about Pennsylvania State University students’ worries about the rise of health care costs.
  • I. Glenn Cohen shared a link to an article in The New York Times entitled “‘Environmental Poisoning’ of Iraq Is Claimed” and states that many veterans suffer from environmental poisoning while the “IOM [is] not sure.”
  • Kate Greenwood retweeted Austin Frakt and an article from The Incidental Economist about the negative impact of the insurance market before the implementation of the Affordable Care Act on entrepreneurship.
  • Stephen Latham tweeted a link to his blog reporting on the recent announcement of the Public Health Committee of the Connecticut Legislature that it does not plan to vote on a bill addressing “Aid-In-Dying” or physician-assisted suicide despite “61% public support for the bill.”