Clinical and Pro Bono Programs

Providing clinical and pro bono opportunities to Harvard Law School students

Category: Annoucements (page 1 of 5)

HRP Welcomes New Spring Staff to the International Human Rights Clinic

Via the International Human Rights Clinic

With the semester already off to a great start, we’d like to extend the warmest welcome to our new spring staff! We have two new members of the International Human Rights Clinic. Read below to learn more about them and make sure to stop by and introduce yourself.

Nicolette Waldman, Senior Clinical Fellow

Nicolette Waldman is a Senior Clinical Fellow for the Spring 2019 term. Previously, she was a researcher on Iraq and Syria for Amnesty International; a researcher for the Center for Civilians in Conflict, covering Gaza, Somalia, Libya and Bosnia; a legal fellow at the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission in Kabul; a program manager for Save the Children in the West Bank and Gaza; a Fulbright scholar in Jordan; and a senior associate in the legal and policy division at Human Rights Watch in New York. Waldman has a B.A. in International Affairs and English Literature from Lewis & Clark College, a J.D. from Harvard Law School, and is a member of the State Bar of New York.

 

Jim Wormington, Clinical Instructor

Jim Wormington is a Clinical Instructor for the Spring 2019 term. He is also a researcher at Human Rights Watch in the Africa Division, where he covers West Africa. He was previously an attorney at the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative, where he conducted research to inform rule of law and human rights development programs, and implemented programs in West and Central Africa. Wormington has also worked at the International Crisis Group and the War Crimes Chamber of the State Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina. He is an English-trained barrister, an associate member of QEB Hollis Whiteman Chambers, and was educated at Cambridge University (MA) and New York University School of Law (LLM). He is fluent in French.

 

CHLPI Welcomes New Team Member Kristin Sukys

Via the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation

The Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation (CHLPI) and the Health Law and Policy Clinic welcome Kristin Sukys to the team as a Policy Analyst!

Kristin joined the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation at Harvard Law School as Project Consultant in August 2018 leading the GIS analysis for the Massachusetts Food is Medicine State Plan and is currently a Policy Analyst working on HLPC’s whole-person care initiatives.

Kristin graduated in May 2018 with a Masters of Science degree in Agriculture, Food, and Environment from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. Specializing in community food systems and public health, her work focused on the intersection of our health care and food systems. Prior to graduate school, she received a B.A. in International Relations specializing in Environmental Issues from Virginia Tech.

A New Harvard Law Building Opens on Mass Ave

Via Harvard Law Today

Credit: NBBJ Boston

By: Clea Simon

Citing its future role in “innovation, deep learning, collegiality, and service,” Dean John F. Manning saluted the opening of the Harvard Law School’s newest building, at 1607 Massachusetts Avenue, on Monday evening. At a joyful reception in the open first floor, guests, faculty and community members nibbled pizza and sweets while taking in enlarged photos of the location’s previous incarnations, watching a time-lapse film of the structure’s 12 months of construction and queuing up for tours of the interior. Raising a glass of champagne, Manning thanked the many individuals from Harvard Law School and the City of Cambridge who had made the building possible, and he hailed the LEED Gold certified building as “designed to inspire and provoke collaboration.”

Indeed, the sleek wood and brick structure, which sits across Everett Street from HLS’s Wasserstein Hall, Caspersen Students Center, and Clinical Wing building, was created to foster and expand the law school’s experiential and clinical learning and tosupport research programs. Along with space for faculty offices and other future uses, 1607 Massachusetts Avenue, the first Harvard Law School project designed by Alex Krieger, a principal of NBBJ and professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, will provide elbow room for Harvard Law’s clinical education and research.  It will serve as the new home for the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation, which includes the Health Law and Policy Clinic and also the Food Law and Policy Clinic. The building will also house the Criminal Justice Institute and the Harvard Defenders, a clinical program and student practice organization, respectively, in which students represent clients in criminal hearings; the Islamic Legal Studies Program: Law and Social Change; the Animal Law & Policy Program; and the Access to Justice Lab.

“This new building reflects a commitment from both former Dean Martha Minow and our current dean to having a law school curriculum that reflects the needs of our law students and the community writ large,” said Clinical Professor Robert Greenwald, director of the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation.

Clinical or experiential learning, Greenwald said, “needs a very different kind of space” than traditional lecture halls or classrooms. As an example, he described the new Health Law and Policy Clinic space, which features open areas, where students can work collaboratively, as well as more private offices and conference rooms. “A lot of the work happens via Skype and other electronic communication,” he said. “So all of our offices are designed for that.”

 Credit: Lorin Ganger

“The new building will provide invaluable space for the clinical programs and modern facilities to engage in the lawyering advocacy and teaching that are at the heart of the clinical programs,” said Clinical Professor of Law and Vice Dean for Experiential and Clinical Education Daniel L. Nagin. “This space will promote collaboration and enhance the ability of staff and students and faculty to interact and think across boundaries,” he added.

Continue reading.

HLS Students Honored for Their Pro Bono Work

HLS alumna Amy Volz, J.D. ’18 and the other recipients of the 2018 Adams Pro Bono award pictured (left to right) with Chief Justice Ralph Gants ’80, Justice Kimberly Budd ’91, and Elizabeth Ennen Esq., Chair of the SJC Standing Committee on Pro Bono Legal Services.

The Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs offers its heartfelt congratulations to the 55 Harvard Law students that were recognized by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Standing Committee on Pro Bono Legal Services for their commitment to pro bono work. The ceremony was held at the Adams Courthouse on October 18 and the students are listed on the SJC’s Pro Bono Honor Roll website.

The recognition is presented annually to law firms, solo practitioners, in-house corporate counsel offices, government attorney offices, non-profit organizations, law school faculties, and law students who certify that they have contributed at least 50 hours of legal services without receiving pay or academic credit.

Alumua Amy Volz ’18 was also honored with a Pro Bono Publico Award for being someone who demonstrated an outstanding and exceptional commitment to providing unpaid legal services to those in need for her extensive pro bono work at HLS. During her time at HLS, Volz contributed thousands of hours of pro bono service to clients through the Harvard Immigration Project (HIP), the International Human Rights Clinic, and the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program (HIRC).

 

Charmaine Archer JD’19 Karin Drucker JD’19 Margaret Huang JD’19 Daniel Reis JD’20
Lindsay Bailey JD’19 Jenna El-Fakih JD’20 Milo Rohr Inglehart JD’19  Joseph Rosenberg JD’19
Megan Barnes JD’19 Ian Eppler JD’19  Jason Kohn JD’19 Bradford Sherman JD’19
Nathan Berla-Shulock JD’19 Mingming Feng JD ’20  Sarah Libowsky JD’20  Laura Smith JD’20
Katrina Marie Black JD’19 Rebecca Friedman JD’19 Daniela Lorenzo JD’19  Elizabeth Soltan JD’19
Laura Bloomer JD’19 Lindsay Funk JD ’20 Marissa Marandola JD’19 Benjamin Spiegel JD’20
Elizabeth Carr JD’20 Anna Gee JD ’19 Deborah Mariottini JD’19 Teresa Spinelli JD’19
Jenny M. Chan JD’19 Kaitlyn Gerber JD’19 Allena Martin JD’19  Bing Sun JD’19
Willy Chotzen-Freund JD’19 Jillian Goodman JD ’19  Marissa McGarry JD’19  Isabelle Sun JD’19
Chloe Cotton JD’20 Elizabeth H. Gyori JD ’19 Patrick Nowak JD’19 Jianing Xie JD’19
D Dangaran JD’20 Andrew Leon Hanna JD’19  Kiera O’Rourke JD’20
Alyxandra Darensbourg JD’20  Michael Haley JD’19  David Papas JD’19
Dalia Deak JD’19  Josephine Herman JD’20 Madelyn Petersen JD’19
Lolita De Palma JD’20  Felipe Hernandez JD’20  Heather Pickerell JD’20
Yang Ding JD’19 Rebekah K. Holtz JD’19 Emanuel Powell JD’ 19

Clinical Professor Esme Caramello Honored as one the 2018 Top Women of Law

Clinical Professor Esme Caramello ’99 is among the 2018 Top Women of Law honored by Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly. The award ceremony, held on October 18, honors “legal educators, trailblazers, and role models who have demonstrated outstanding accomplishments in social justice advocacy and business.”

Professor Caramello joined the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau (HLAB) in 2009 as deputy director and clinical instructor after having worked in the Housing Unit at HLS’s WilmerHale Legal Services Center and at Suffolk University Law School’s Housing Clinic. As a clinical instructor at the WilmerHale Legal Services Center, she worked with students to help protect the rights of low-income tenants and homeowners. She was appointed to clinical professor of law in 2014 by Dean Martha Minow and shortly thereafter became the faculty director at HLAB.

“Esme’s experience in tenants’ rights is second to none,” said Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow. “Under her guidance, students connect practice and theory to solve important legal and policy issues affecting low-income individuals. Passionate and compassionate, her strategic approach ensures that the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau will continue to lead in vital work.”

Professor Caramello currently serves on several boards, including the Boston Bar Foundation, and the Cambridge City Manager’s Advisory Committee, and the Access to Justice Commission, where she serves on the Access to Attorneys Committee and co-chairs the Justice for All Housing Working Group. Professor Caramello also helped found the Developing Justice project at HLS, an initiative that uses technology to close the justice gap.

Professor Caramello is an inspiration to many students, faculty, and staff. In 2014, she was honored by HLS, the Women’s Law Association, and the Law and International Development Society in their photo exhibition for International Women’s Day, entitled Inspiring Change, Inspiring Us. HLAB alum Annie Lee who nominated Esme at the time wrote:

I’m inspired by Esme Caramello who works tirelessly to help low-income tenants facing eviction…When she’s not in court, Esme’s in the Bureau teaching and mentoring HLAB student attorneys. She’s generous with her time and dedicated to making us astute, ethical, and compassionate lawyers. I feel so lucky to have gotten to work with Esme on an eviction case last year. She let me take the reins in the case and strategize how to keep an elderly African-American woman in her home. She’s an excellent clinical instructor and has mentored me, as well as multiple classes of HLS men and women.

Caramello is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School.

CHLPI Associate Director Sarah Downer to Present at a Training Aimed to Get People Cooking in Community Kitchens

Calling all community kitchens…meeting Thursday

Via The Recorder 

In an effort to get people cooking in community kitchens to make better use of local foods, the Franklin Regional Council of Governments is hosting a training today from 5 to 7 p.m. at the the Western Massachusetts Food Processing Center in Greenfield.

The effort is aimed at heating up use of commercial kitchens at schools, houses of worship and other sites while working through concerns that may come up about liability, according to Phoebe Walker, the COG’s director of community services.

“We’re hoping to find ways to get people to eat better, and that means making community facilities more available,” Walker said, “but not increasing their liability.

Anyone who’s thinking of turning pounds of tomatoes into sauce for donation to a local food pantry, pickling garden vegetables or starting their own food business may be interested in the discussion, along with operators of school or church kitchens that could be shared with community cooks or food entrepreneurs.

A full dinner will be served as part of the program, which will include presentations by Rachel Stoler, the COG’s community health program manager; Randy Crochier, COG food safety agent;  Joanna Benoit, the food processing center’s food systems program manager, Stacey Wood and David Soule, co-owners of Whole Harmony, as well as Sarah Downer, associate director of Harvard Law School’s Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation;  Erica Kyzmir-McKeon, an attorney and senior fellow at Conservation Law Foundation’s Legal Food Hub’ and Cheryl Sbarra, director of policy and law with the Massachusetts Association of Health Boards.

Registration is required at  www.eventbrite.com/e/shared-use-and-community-kitchens-training-tickets-50224901031

Let’s Discuss

Via the Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program 

This fall 2018, the instructors and students of Harvard Law School’s “The Lawyer as Facilitator” course will host Let’s Disagree—a series of three small-group discussions, led by student facilitators as the capstone event of a semester-long facilitation workshop. We aim to convene people with diverse personal backgrounds and political views to address polarizing civic issues. Let’s Disagree is designed to explore deep differences of opinion in a facilitated setting that encourages participants to embrace and learn from conflict—to learn to disagree passionately on matters of vital civic importance, and still maintain a strong, vital community. We welcome students, staff, faculty, and members of the greater Boston community.

Let’s Disagree will meet from 1:00–2:30pm on October 31, November 7, and November 14, on the Harvard Law School campus. Participants are asked to commit to attending all three of the scheduled conversations and to bring a willingness to engage with respect and curiosity in a civil discussion of challenging issues. An optional 30-minute debrief with co-participants and facilitators will follow each session.

Topics will be determined near the time of each meeting of Let’s Disagree to ensure that each session is current and relevant.

If you are interested in applying to participate in this dialogue series, please fill out the application here. Your responses will help us select and assign participants to small groups with an eye to achieving a range of views and voices in each group.

We will follow up with you by email to let you know if you have been accepted to the program and confirm your participation.

HRP Welcomes New Staff to the International Human Rights Clinic

Via the Human Rights Program

With the semester start, we’d like to extend the warmest welcome to our new staff! We have four new members of the International Human Rights Clinic. Read below to learn more about them and make sure you swing by to introduce yourself.

Thomas Becker

Clinical Instructor

Thomas Becker is a Clinical Instructor at the Human Rights Program. He is an attorney and activist who has spent most of the past decade working on human rights issues in Bolivia. As a student at Harvard Law School, he was the driving force behind launching Mamani v. Sanchez de Lozada, a lawsuit against Bolivia’s former president and defense minister for their role in the massacre of indigenous peasants. After graduating, he moved to Bolivia, where he has worked with the survivors for over a decade. This spring, Becker and his co-counsel obtained a $10 million jury verdict for family members of those killed in “Black October,” marking the first time a living ex-president has been held accountable in a U.S. court for human rights violations. The verdict was overturned by a federal judge and is currently being appealed in the Eleventh Circuit of Appeals. Becker’s human rights work has included investigating torture and disappearance of Adavasis in India, documenting war crimes in Lebanon, and serving as a nonviolent bodyguard for the Zapatista guerrillas in Chiapas, Mexico. When he is not practicing law, Becker is an award-winning musician and songwriter who has recorded with Grammy-winning producers and toured throughout the world as a drummer and guitarist.

Amelia Evans

Clinical Instructor

Amelia Evans is an international human rights lawyer and an expert on business and human rights. She co-founded MSI Integrity in 2012 and continues to spearhead its development. Amelia has investigated and reported on business and human rights-related issues in a number of countries, most particularly in the Central African and Asia-Pacific regions. Previously, she was the Global Human Rights Fellow at Harvard Law School and was a clinical supervisor at Harvard Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic. She also clerked at the New Zealand Court of Appeal, and worked at the Crown Law Office in New Zealand and the Victoria Government Solicitor’s Office in Australia. Amelia obtained her LL.M. from Harvard Law School, and LL.B. (Hons.) and B.C.A. (Economics and Finance) from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Amelia also works on nonfiction / documentary film projects.

 

Emma Golding

Program Assistant

Emma Golding is the Program Assistant for the International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School. Prior to joining the Clinic, she worked in research administration at Boston Children’s Hospital. She has also spent time as an editorial assistant, faculty assistant, legal secretary, bartender, waitress, hostess, busser, catering manager, circus performer, au pair, natural history & ecology educator, and Audubon Society counselor.  She holds a B.A. in Journalism & Political Science from UMass Amherst.

 

Kelsey Ryan

Program Coordinator

Kelsey is the Program Coordinator for the International Human Rights Clinic. Prior to joining HRP, she worked in the Dean’s Office at Harvard Law School. She holds a B.A. in International Studies and Spanish Language from Emmanuel College in Boston, MA. From 2014-2015 she lived in Athens, Greece while completing a Fulbright Teaching Assistantship Grant. She is currently finishing her master’s in International Relations through Harvard Extension School, and returns to Crete, Greece, each summer to assist with Emmanuel College’s Eastern Mediterranean Security Studies Program.

New Criminal Justice Appellate Clinic Info Session

Come learn more about the NEW Criminal Justice Appellate Clinic!

September 13th, WCC 3016
12-1pm
Lunch will be served.

This is a new by-application winter term clinic offering. Students will participate in an winter externship with the Roderick & Solange MacArthur Justice Center (“MJC”) in Washington, D.C., working on appeals before federal circuit courts and/or the U.S. Supreme Court that raise important issues related to civil rights and the criminal justice system.

MJC is one of the nation’s premier civil rights organizations and champions criminal justice reform through litigation, in areas that include police misconduct, rights of the accused, issues facing indigent prisoners, the death penalty, and the rights of detainees. The organization’s Washington, D.C. office focuses specifically on appellate litigation as a vehicle for achieving change in these areas

For more information, please consult the clinic’s webpage: https://hls.harvard.edu/dept/clinical/criminal-justice-appellate-clinic/

FLPC Welcomes New Clinical Fellow

Via the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation

Brian Fink joins the Food Law and Policy Clinic in September 2018 as a Clinical Fellow. Brian was the Farm and Food Legal Fellow at Yale Law School. In that position, Brian oversaw the launch of a legal services program that connects income-eligible farmers and food entrepreneurs to pro bono attorneys. Also while at Yale, Brian worked closely with students on legal and academic projects related to food-system matters.

During law school, Brian worked on agricultural, food, and environmental issues as a fellow at the Resnick Center for Food Law and Policy and as a legal volunteer at the Sustainable Economies Law Center. He earned his J.D. from UCLA School of Law, where he was an editor of the UCLA Law Review and president of the Food Law Society, and his B.A. in Journalism from University of Washington.

Cyberlaw Clinic Welcomes (Back) HLS Students, Preps for AY 2018-19

Via the Cyberlaw Clinic

The Cyberlaw Clinic is pleased to welcome back returning 2Ls and 3Ls and welcome new 1Ls and LLMs to Cambridge for the start of the 2018-19 academic year! We hope that everyone had a restful and reinvigorating summer. As we ramp up for the fall semester, we offer some announcements about the program and thoughts on the coming year.

First, on a bittersweet note, we bid farewell to our dear friend and colleague Vivek Krishnamurthy. Vivek is returning to private practice at the law firm, Foley Hoag LLP, after four years working with us in the Clinic. Vivek joined us from Foley back in 2014, and his practice and teaching activities in the Clinic have focused on international human rights and civil liberties issues. Vivek will be sorely missed, but we are happy to report that he will remain involved at Harvard Law School and the Berkman Klein Center—co-teaching the Counseling and Legal Strategy in the Digital Age seminar at HLS this fall with Chris Bavitz.  Vivek also joins our our illustrious roster of Clinic Advisors, with whom we regularly collaborate. We wish Vivek success in his new endeavors and expect that we will continue to work closely together in the months and years to come.

We are delighted to report that Jessica Fjeld has been promoted to Assistant Director of the Cyberlaw Clinic and will assume a central role in managing our program. Jess has done tremendous work over the past two years in the Clinic, helping to lead our copyright practice and working with students to advise a wide range of individuals and startups with an emphasis on clients in media, arts, and the creative industries. Jess joins the board of the Global Network Initiative and is also a Clinical Instructor and Lecturer on Law at HLS.  She will be co-teaching the Cyberlaw Clinic Seminar this falland spring.

The Clinic is also thrilled to announce that Mason Kortz, who has been with us for almost two years as a Clinical Fellow, has assumed the role of Clinical Instructor. Mason has deep expertise with civil liberties and privacy issues, and he brings his strong technical background in data science to bear on many of our projects. He is also a key member of the Berkman Klein Center’s research team, contributing to the Center’s Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence initiative and producing valuable scholarship on the role of explanation in law and AI.

Kendra Albert begins their second year with us as a Clinical Fellow, managing projects that related to computer security research, vulnerability disclosure, circumvention, and a host of related issues. Kendra was instrumental this past year in overseeing the Clinic’s involvement in the Copyright Office’s Section 1201 triennial rulemaking proceedings, leading a student team that represented the Software Preservation Network in filing comments and testifying before the Library of Congress about the need for exemptions from liability to promote archival activities.  Kendra has also been the Clinic’s point person in managing work relating to voting technology and election security in the runup to the November 2018 midterms. In the spring, Kendra will be co-teaching Advanced Constitutional Law: New Issues in Speech, Press, and Religion with Professor Martha Minow.

Project Coordinator Hannah Hilligoss will continue to keep the Clinic’s trains running on time while contributing to BKC research efforts on topics ranging from telecommunications policy to the human rights implications of AI technologies. Hannah has also played a major role in the launch of Harvard’s new “Techtopia” initiative, which promises to connect faculty and students across Harvard with an interest in the ethical, social, political, and legal implications of emerging digital technology.

Susan Crawford and Chris Bavitz round out the Clinic team, managing student projects and teaching courses about law and regulation as they relate to communicationsmusic and digital mediaautonomous vehicles, and the Internet.

We kept projects afloat this summer with an all-star cast of law school interns, and we expect more than thirty students to join us for the fall term (including three advanced clinical students, returning after working with us this past spring). The Clinic’s substantive docket will cover our usual wide variety of projects, with a few practice areas being especially active. Those include:

  • answering questions about bias in the use of algorithms and machine learning technologies by companies and government actors;
  • addressing legal issues raised by existing and future art-generating AI technologies, as we consider the interaction between algorithmic tech, the human creative process, and our system of intellectual property laws;
  • supporting efforts to promote government transparency and accountability through targeted use of freedom of information laws and broader open government initiatives; and
  • advising digital archives on questions surrounding online access to materials, particularly around IP issues that arise in connection with cross-border operations.

We could not be more excited to welcome our incoming students next week.  Best wishes to all for a fruitful 2018-19 academic year!

Congratulations to Esme Caramello, one of the 2018 Top Women of Law

Congratulations to Esme Caramello, who is among the 2018 Top Women of Law honored by Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly! The award ceremony, which will be held on October 18, honors “legal educators, trailblazers, and role models who have demonstrated outstanding accomplishments in social justice advocacy and business.”

Education Law Clinic Welcomes Bettina Neuefeind

Bettina Neuefeind is an attorney with the Trauma and Learning Policy Initiative, a collaboration between Harvard Law School’s Education Law Clinic and Massachusetts Advocates for Children. As a longtime direct services attorney and advocate for culture change around trauma, mental health and schools, Bettina assists families of children exposed to trauma in obtaining appropriate educational services, supports the clinical education of law students, and collaborates with the leadership team on achieving systemic progress growing the safe and supportive school culture movement.

Prior to joining TLPI, Bettina was a Research Fellow at Harvard Law School investigating what fuels systems change in anti-poverty work, and an affiliate at Harvard’s Food Law and Policy Clinic, where she led the School Food Interventions project and focused on food literacy education and school food culture overhauls in applied settings. Before coming to Harvard, Bettina was a fair housing attorney at Bay Area Legal Aid in Oakland, California, serving low-income clients with disabilities and specializing in accommodations where housing was threatened due to mental health issues. Bettina received her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School. She clerked for the Honorable Daniel T.K. Hurley of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida, and for the Honorable Susan S. Beck, Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Court of Appeals.

Welcome Bettina!

Housing Law Clinic Welcomes New Clinical Instructor Nicole Summers

Nicole Summers joined Harvard Law School as a Clinical Instructor with the Housing Law Clinic. Prior to joining Harvard, she served as legal fellow with the NYU Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy and as an adjunct professor at New York University School of Law. Prior to working at NYU, Nicole worked as an attorney with The Bronx Defenders in their civil action practice.

Transactional Law Clinics Welcome New Clinical Instructor Noel Roycroft

Noel Roycroft joined the Transactional Law Clinics of Harvard Law School as a Clinical Instructor in  August 2018.  Before coming to Harvard, Noel was an associate in the corporate department of Ropes & Gray, LLP and a member of the firm’s asset management group where she focused her practice on representing investment products, their boards, and managers in transactional, regulatory, and compliance matters. Noel was also previously a fellow and associate counsel with the national office of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. Prior to gaining her law degree, Noel worked in the Massachusetts House of Representatives, where she was Chief of Staff to a Committee Chair and State Representative. Noel received her B.A. from Bowdoin College, graduate certificate in non-profit management from Northeastern University, and J.D. from American University’s Washington College of Law.

Welcome Noel!

CHLPI Welcomes Andrea Kunst

Andrea Kunst joined the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation in July 2018 as the Foundation and Corporate Relations Officer. She has practiced philanthropic fundraising, strategic advancement, and non-profit organization management for twenty years. She is an accomplished fundraising generalist with a track record of creating successful customized advancement plans for schools and nonprofits, consistently meeting and exceeding fundraising goals. She is founder and executive director of Cushing Mill Contracting, offering development and advancement services to schools and mission driven, non-profit start-ups.

Andrea was the Director of Advancement at Boston Day and Evening Academy, a competency-based, student-centered alternative high school within Boston Public Schools for 10 years; chaired the board of Dorchester Arts Collaborative during the period that it founded Dorchester’s first community art gallery; was Director of Development for Nativity Preparatory School during their successful capital campaign; and has broad experience as a teacher, writer, and manager. Andrea currently sits on the board of PieRSquared, an after-school math tutoring non-profit in Roxbury, and is an alumnus of the Education Policy Fellowship Program. She received both her B.A. in Communications and her M.A. in Writing and Publishing from Emerson College and lives in her adopted community of Dorchester, MA.

Welcome Andrea!

Senior Partners for Justice Public Service Volunteer Internship in the Probate and Family Court- Fall 2018

Senior Partners for Justice, a unique pro bono initiative of the Volunteer Lawyers Project, offers an internship program for law students who want to provide critical assistance to low-income clients while gaining valuable insight into the daily operations of the Probate and Family Court.

ABOUT SENIOR PARTNERS FOR JUSTICE

Founded in 2002 by Hon. Edward M. Ginsburg, a retired justice of the Massachusetts Probate and Family Court, Senior Partners for Justice includes practitioners of all levels of experience, from retired attorneys and judges to new members admitted to the bar and law students, who handle family law matters pro bono for low-income clients who would otherwise go unrepresented.

ABOUT THE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

The program is a 10 week commitment. Interns are placed in the Suffolk, Middlesex, and Norfolk Probate and Family Court Register’s Office, working directly alongside courthouse staff. This is an unpaid, non-credit internship, but it offers invaluable experience and a flexible schedule that can fit around other commitments.

We ask interns to spend at least one full day or two half days, preferably mornings, at their courthouse each week. Students provide information and the appropriate forms to pro se litigants navigating through the Probate and Family Court. In addition interested students may have the opportunity to participate with the Court Service Center and at VLP’s Guardianship and Family Law Clinics.

The nature of the internship is a little different at each court:

  • At Suffolk (located near North Station and Haymarket Station), interns staff the very busy Register’s office and have the chance to help the Lawyer for the Day, and observe court proceedings, and help pro se litigants in the Registry and at the Court Service Center.
  • At Middlesex (located in East Cambridge, at the Lechmere stop of the Green Line), interns rotate between different departments, gaining broad exposure to areas including Divorce, Paternity, and Probate.
  • At Norfolk (located in Canton, accessible only by car), interns work directly with the court staff members who assist pro se litigants, and have a chance for more one-on-one interaction at a less busy court.

Orientation for the Fall Internship will take place in late September (dates TBA).  The Internship program will begin the week after orientation and will run for approximately 10 weeks.

All participants in the internship program will be supervised by the registry staff and receive support from the staff at the Volunteer Lawyers Project, you will receive invitations to trainings, luncheons, and other events provided by the Volunteer Lawyers Project. We encourage incoming interns to review the family law training materials on-line either before or during the internship. These training materials provide a foundation for the work the interns will encounter in the registry. Training materials are available on our website at www.vlpnet.org.

APPLYING

Application are now being accepted for the Fall 2018 Semester. Apply online at https://vlpprobono.wufoo.com/forms/vlp-student-volunteer-application/. If you have questions, please contact Damaris Frias Stone at dfrias@vlpnet.org.

OCP Welcomes Alexis Farmer

Alexis Farmer is our new Communications and Administrative Coordinator, and we are delighted to welcome her to our office and to all of the clinical and pro bono programs!

Alexis comes to us from the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU, where she worked for several years as a Research and Program Associate focusing on redistricting and campaign finance reform.  She graduated from the University of Michigan in 2016, where she interned in a number of non-profit and governmental organizations.  In her senior year of college, she was a columnist for the The Michigan Daily, writing articles about current social and political issues.  In addition to many other responsibilities, Alexis will be writing stories for our blog and also publishing stories that your clinics and SPOs generate.  Please welcome her and send her your stories!

CHLPI Welcomes New Team Member Rachel Landauer

Via the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation

The Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation (CHLPI) welcomes Rachel Landauer to the team as a Clinical Fellow!

Rachel graduated from UCLA School of Law in May 2016 as a member of the David J. Epstein Program in Public Interest Law and Policy, and with a Master of Public Health degree from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. During law school, she worked with projects and organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union’s Reproductive Freedom Project, the National Health Law Program, and the Los Angeles HIV Law & Policy Project, and co-chaired UCLA’s Health Law Society. Immediately prior to joining the Center, Rachel was an associate at Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton LLP, focusing on health care regulatory and compliance matters.

HIRC Director Receives NGO Lawyer of the Year Joint Award

The Federal Bar Association awarded the NGO Lawyer of the Year Joint Award to HIRC’s founder and director Professor Deborah Anker in May. She was honored along with Karen Musalo, Director of the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies at Hastings College of Law. Congratulations to Professor Anker on her accomplishment!

Clinical Program Staff Presented with Harvard Law School’s Dean’s Award of Excellence

Three members of the clinical program received the 2018-2018 Harvard Law School Dean’s Award for Excellence. The award honors staff members who exemplify the spirit of excellence in the Harvard Law School community through leadership, collaboration, commitment, and innovation. Among those awarded were:

Maggie Bay, curriculum planning and enrollment manager, Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs;

Kira Hessekiel, project coordinator of Harvard Law School’s Cyberlaw Clinic; and

Patricio Rossi, clinical instructor within the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau.

Congratulations to Maggie, Kira, and Patricio!

Welcome Lyonel Jean-Pierre Jr.

Lyonel Jean-Pierre Jr. recently joined the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau as a clinical instructor.  He started his law career as a Massachusetts Legal Services Corporation Bart Gordon Fellow with Massachusetts Correctional Legal Services.  When the fellowship ended, Lyonel became a full-time staff attorney with the Worcester Community Legal Aid office (formerly known as Legal Assistance Corporation of Central Massachusetts) where he litigated various domestic relations and restraining order matters.  After nine years with Community Legal Aid, he joined the Law Office of Murphy and Rudolf LLP where he continued to practice in the Probate and Family Court but also represented parents and children in Care and Protection matters in the Juvenile Court as a member of the Children and Family Law Division Panel of the Committee for Public Counsel Services.

During his career, Lyonel has served as Co-Chair of the Family Law Section for the Worcester County Bar Association and worked with various community partners in the Worcester to address the effect that domestic violence has on families.  In 2012, he was honored with the YWCA Great Guy Award & Official State Citation.

Lyonel received a bachelors degree from Brandeis University where, in addition to completing his studies, he mentored “at risk” youth and was a track and field athlete for four years.  After college he obtained his J.D. from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York City.

Rachel Viscomi named assistant clinical professor of law and director of the Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program

Via Harvard Law Today

Rachel A. Viscomi ’01 has been appointed assistant clinical professor of law at Harvard Law School and named director of the Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program (HNMCP). She was formerly a lecturer on law at HLS and the acting director of HNMCP.

“Rachel Viscomi has a deep understanding of both the theory and practice of negotiation and conflict-resolution, which she teaches expertly in the classroom and the clinic,” said John Manning, the Morgan and Helen Chu Dean of Harvard Law School. “I am delighted that Professor Viscomi is joining our faculty to teach negotiation to our students and to enhance learning about this important field.”

Continue reading.

Community Enterprise Project 2018-2019 – Apply Now!

The Community Enterprise Project (Fall 2018 and Spring 2019) is a by-application division of the Transactional Law Clinics in which students engage in transactional legal representation through a community lawyering model. CEP students work with community organizations to identify organizational and community legal needs and develop comprehensive strategies to address those needs while gaining valuable, real-world transactional law experience.

In Fall 2018, CEP students will represent worker cooperatives, nonprofits, and small businesses in the Greater Boston area on various transactional legal matters. CEP students will also work with community groups and city/state officials on advocacy projects focused on one or both of the following:

  • Cannabis Equity Toolkit: this year, MA enacted the country’s first statewide cannabis “equity” program, giving preferential treatment to people who have been disproportionally affected by prior drug laws (particularly those in the Black and Brown communities). CEP students will create a legal toolkit (and conduct workshops in the community) that provides guidance on the licensing and permitting requirements in the City of Boston.
  • Worker Coops: the popularity of worker coops has exploded in recent years with the rise of the solidarity economy movement and anti-capitalist sentiment. CEP students, through discussion with organizers, existing coops and others, will explore ways in which legal services can be better streamlined with technical/business assistance and community organizing.

Apply Now!

To apply to CEP, please submit a statement of interest (no more than 200 words) and resume.

Please note that CEP students must commit to spending at least half of their clinical hours on Wednesdays and/or Thursdays at the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School in Jamaica Plain.

CEP applications should be addressed to Brian Price and Carlos Teuscher and submitted via e-mail to cteuscher@law.harvard.edu and clinical@law.harvard.edu

If accepted, students will register for 4 or 5 clinical credits through the Transactional Law Clinics and 2 course credits for the associated clinical seminar. Continuing TLC students may take CEP for 2 or 3 clinical credits and do not need to register in the associated clinical seminar.

Questions may be directed to Carlos Teuscher at cteuscher@law.harvard.edu.

Welcome, Shelley Barron!

The Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs would like to extend a warm welcome to Shelley Barron, who recently joined the Tenant Advocacy Project (TAP) as a Clinical Instructor.

After earning her JD from Northeastern University School of Law in 2012, Shelley began working at Community Legal Aid, Inc. in Worcester, MA as a Staff Attorney. While there, Shelley was a part of the Honorable Harry Zarrow Homeless Advocacy Outreach Project, which aims to prevent or reduce homelessness by providing legal assistance to those experiencing or at-risk for homelessness. Shelley focused on representing clients in eviction defense and housing discrimination cases, as well as advocating for access to shelters and affordable housing.

In 2015, Shelley began working as a Staff Attorney at Casa Myrna Vazquez, Inc. (CMV), a non-profit domestic violence agency in Boston. She provided an array of legal services to low-income clients in cases involving abuse prevention orders, family law, housing issues, and immigration matters. Shelley was also involved in managing Medical-Legal Partnerships with two Boston area hospitals while at CMV.

As a Clinical Instructor at TAP, Shelley will be supervising law students as they provide legal assistance to applicants and low-income tenants of affordable housing programs.

HRP Awards Four Post-Graduate Fellowships in Human Rights for the 2018-2019 Year

Via the International Human Rights Program

The Human Rights Program is pleased to announce its cohort of post-graduate fellowships in human rights. This year, Conor Hartnett, JD’18, and Alejandra Elguero Altner, LLM’17, have been awarded the Henigson Human Rights Fellowship and Jenny B. Domino, LLM’18, and Anna Khalfaoui, LLM’17, have been awarded the Satter Human Rights Fellowship.

Continue reading

Carol Flores of CJI receives Shatter the Ceiling Award

Amy Soto, Administrative Director of CJI, with Carol Flores

Last month the Harvard Women’s Law Association presented the annual Shatter the Ceiling Award to Carol Flores, Administrative Coordinator of the Criminal Justice Institute (CJI).  In presenting the award the students noted that Carol contributes to the success of a program that makes a big impact on many students as well as criminal defendants.  “Her dedication and love for her job really shows.”  Congratulations, Carol!

Representing Veterans in Discharge Upgrades: A Step-by-Step Pro Bono Training

Dana Montalto, Elizabeth Gwin and Evan Seamone of the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School will be conducting a training called Representing Veterans in Discharge Upgrades: A Step-by-Step Pro Bono Training on Tuesday, May 22, 2018 from 3pm to 5:30pm. The training will be held at the Boston Bar Association located at 16 Beacon Street, Boston MA.

Many of the men and women who served in the U.S. armed forces are cut off from veterans’ services and benefits because they were given a less-than-honorable discharge. They may have served in combat or have suffered physical or mental wounds, but are nevertheless unable to access much-needed treatment and support from federal and state veterans agencies because of their discharge status. In many cases, the origin of their need for support—for example, service-related post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury—also contributed to the conduct that led to their less-than-honorable discharges.

The training will offer a step-by-step approach to building a persuasive discharge upgrade petition, including a review of best practices for client meetings, gathering letters of support, engaging medical experts, and drafting a brief. They will also discuss how to address common challenges in discharge upgrade practice, such as tracking down government records and maintaining contact with clients who may be in crisis or dealing with other issues. Finally, the training will provide important updates about discharge upgrade law, including recommendations for how best to use the recent Kurta Memorandum to advocate for veterans discharged for mental health-related misconduct. Both attorneys with experience in discharge upgrade practice and those who are interested in getting more involved are encouraged to attend. Law students are welcome but are not eligible to take pro bono referrals from the Veterans Justice Pro Bono Partnership (VJPBP),

Attorneys who participate in the training will be eligible to join the Veterans Justice Pro Bono Partnership established in 2015 by the Veterans Legal Clinic at the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School. Through the VJPBP, the Veterans Legal Clinic screens and refers veterans seeking discharge upgrades to private attorneys and then provides ongoing support and expert resources to those attorneys throughout the case. The generosity and efforts of VJPBP attorneys help to address the enormous gap in the provision of legal services to veterans and will provide much-needed advocacy to those who served the nation in uniform.

Immediately after the training, the BBA’s Active Duty Military & Veterans Forum will host a reception for program attendees and other members and supporters of the Boston veterans community. The reception will be an opportunity to build our community and to recognize the important work you have been doing on behalf of veterans, as well as to honor Memorial Day.

If you are interested in attending, you can register for the training and the reception through the BBA website.

Susan Farbstein Honored in Harvard Women’s Law Association’s International Women’s Day Exhibit

Via International Human Rights Clinic

A portrait of Susan Farbstein, Co-Director of our International Human Rights Clinic, on display at Harvard Law School this week in celebration of International Women’s Day.

On this International Women’s Day, and every other day, we’re full of gratitude for all the women who push for change around the world. But we’re feeling particularly happy and proud today to see our very own Susan Farbstein honored in this year’s International Women’s Day portrait exhibit, organized by the Harvard Women’s Law Association (WLA).

Susan, who co-directs our International Human Rights Clinic, is among 25 luminaries celebrated in the Wasserstein Hall exhibit for their “astounding contributions” in the areas of law and policy.

They include Tarana Burke, a civil rights activist and the creator of “Me Too,” a phrase invented to raise awareness of the prevalence of sexual abuse in society; Zainah Anwar, a leading feminist activist and scholar in Malaysia, and the current Director of Musawah; Sarah McBride, an LGBT rights activist who serves as the National Press Secretary for the Human Rights Campaign; Losang Rabgey, the co-founder of Machik, a nonprofit dedicated to social innovation in Tibet through educational development and capacity building; and Michele Roberts, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Association, and the first woman elected to head a major professional sports union in North America.

It comes as no surprise to us that Susan stands among them. As an expert in Alien Tort Statute litigation, among other things, she has been co-counsel in such landmark human rights cases as Wiwa v. Shellin Re: South African Apartheid Litigation, and now Mamani v. Sanchez de Lozada and Sanchez Berzain. That historic case, which began trial in Federal District Court in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on Monday, marks the first time a former head of state stands trial in a civil case in U.S. court for human rights abuses.

Continue reading

Summer Internships for Law Students

This list will be updated periodically.
For questions about each listing, please contact the respective program.

Harvard Legal Aid Bureau

The Harvard Legal Aid Bureau hires approximately 15 law students to serve as Summer Legal Interns. Summer Legal Interns will be the primary case handlers on approximately 10-15 cases at a time in the areas of housing, family, government benefits, wage and hour litigation, and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS).

View full posting


Legal Services Center

The Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School seeks law students to serve as interns this coming summer.  Our summer program runs from Monday, May 21st – Friday, July 27th, 2018.  (Note: on a case-by-case basis, we will also consider split-summers and summer schedules that begin before May 21st and/or end after July 27th).

Located at the crossroads of Jamaica Plain and Roxbury, the Legal Services Center is Harvard Law School’s largest clinical placement, housing multiple clinics and providing direct legal services to hundreds of low-and-moderate income residents in the Greater Boston area each year. Our longstanding mission is to educate law students for practice and professional service while simultaneously meeting the critical legal needs of the community.

View full posting


Criminal Justice Institute

Application Deadline: April 27, 2018

Law clerks can expect to perform legal research, draft motions, interview clients and witnesses, perform field investigation, assist CJI clinical instructors with every aspect of the case, attend court proceedings and perform a wide range of research and case preparation duties. CJI is an excellent place for a clerkship as you will be matched with a seasoned clinical instructor, and you will gain valuable experience researching, investigating, drafting motions, and interviewing witnesses.

View full posting

 

Older posts