Clinical and Pro Bono Programs

Providing clinical and pro bono opportunities to Harvard Law School students

Tag: Clinical and Pro Bono Opportunities

Senior Partners for Justice Public Service Volunteer Internship in the Probate and Family Court- Fall 2018

Senior Partners for Justice, a unique pro bono initiative of the Volunteer Lawyers Project, offers an internship program for law students who want to provide critical assistance to low-income clients while gaining valuable insight into the daily operations of the Probate and Family Court.

ABOUT SENIOR PARTNERS FOR JUSTICE

Founded in 2002 by Hon. Edward M. Ginsburg, a retired justice of the Massachusetts Probate and Family Court, Senior Partners for Justice includes practitioners of all levels of experience, from retired attorneys and judges to new members admitted to the bar and law students, who handle family law matters pro bono for low-income clients who would otherwise go unrepresented.

ABOUT THE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

The program is a 10 week commitment. Interns are placed in the Suffolk, Middlesex, and Norfolk Probate and Family Court Register’s Office, working directly alongside courthouse staff. This is an unpaid, non-credit internship, but it offers invaluable experience and a flexible schedule that can fit around other commitments.

We ask interns to spend at least one full day or two half days, preferably mornings, at their courthouse each week. Students provide information and the appropriate forms to pro se litigants navigating through the Probate and Family Court. In addition interested students may have the opportunity to participate with the Court Service Center and at VLP’s Guardianship and Family Law Clinics.

The nature of the internship is a little different at each court:

  • At Suffolk (located near North Station and Haymarket Station), interns staff the very busy Register’s office and have the chance to help the Lawyer for the Day, and observe court proceedings, and help pro se litigants in the Registry and at the Court Service Center.
  • At Middlesex (located in East Cambridge, at the Lechmere stop of the Green Line), interns rotate between different departments, gaining broad exposure to areas including Divorce, Paternity, and Probate.
  • At Norfolk (located in Canton, accessible only by car), interns work directly with the court staff members who assist pro se litigants, and have a chance for more one-on-one interaction at a less busy court.

Orientation for the Fall Internship will take place in late September (dates TBA).  The Internship program will begin the week after orientation and will run for approximately 10 weeks.

All participants in the internship program will be supervised by the registry staff and receive support from the staff at the Volunteer Lawyers Project, you will receive invitations to trainings, luncheons, and other events provided by the Volunteer Lawyers Project. We encourage incoming interns to review the family law training materials on-line either before or during the internship. These training materials provide a foundation for the work the interns will encounter in the registry. Training materials are available on our website at www.vlpnet.org.

APPLYING

Application are now being accepted for the Fall 2018 Semester. Apply online at https://vlpprobono.wufoo.com/forms/vlp-student-volunteer-application/. If you have questions, please contact Damaris Frias Stone at dfrias@vlpnet.org.

Community Enterprise Project 2018-2019 – Apply Now!

The Community Enterprise Project (Fall 2018 and Spring 2019) is a by-application division of the Transactional Law Clinics in which students engage in transactional legal representation through a community lawyering model. CEP students work with community organizations to identify organizational and community legal needs and develop comprehensive strategies to address those needs while gaining valuable, real-world transactional law experience.

In Fall 2018, CEP students will represent worker cooperatives, nonprofits, and small businesses in the Greater Boston area on various transactional legal matters. CEP students will also work with community groups and city/state officials on advocacy projects focused on one or both of the following:

  • Cannabis Equity Toolkit: this year, MA enacted the country’s first statewide cannabis “equity” program, giving preferential treatment to people who have been disproportionally affected by prior drug laws (particularly those in the Black and Brown communities). CEP students will create a legal toolkit (and conduct workshops in the community) that provides guidance on the licensing and permitting requirements in the City of Boston.
  • Worker Coops: the popularity of worker coops has exploded in recent years with the rise of the solidarity economy movement and anti-capitalist sentiment. CEP students, through discussion with organizers, existing coops and others, will explore ways in which legal services can be better streamlined with technical/business assistance and community organizing.

Apply Now!

To apply to CEP, please submit a statement of interest (no more than 200 words) and resume.

Please note that CEP students must commit to spending at least half of their clinical hours on Wednesdays and/or Thursdays at the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School in Jamaica Plain.

CEP applications should be addressed to Brian Price and Carlos Teuscher and submitted via e-mail to cteuscher@law.harvard.edu and clinical@law.harvard.edu

If accepted, students will register for 4 or 5 clinical credits through the Transactional Law Clinics and 2 course credits for the associated clinical seminar. Continuing TLC students may take CEP for 2 or 3 clinical credits and do not need to register in the associated clinical seminar.

Questions may be directed to Carlos Teuscher at cteuscher@law.harvard.edu.

Last Day to Enroll in a Clinic for Spring 2018!

Clinics with Open Seats

The following spring clinics still have a few seats available!

If interested, please email Maggie Bay (mbay@law.harvard.edu) by the end of the day.

Please do not hesitate to contact our office (clinical@law.harvard.edu) with any questions.

Spring Clinics with Open Seats – If Interested, Please Respond A.S.A.P.

If you would like to join one of the clinics below, please email us as soon as possible.  

Any open seats will be awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Please Note: The drop deadline has now passed for all spring clinics.  If you are enrolled in another spring clinic, you may not drop that clinic without receiving a “WD” (withdrawal) notation.

Deadline Extended – Election Law and Voting Rights, Spring 2018 Independent Clinical Opportunity

Update: Deadline Extended to 1/8/18 at 5PM

Please Note: Students who meet the initial deadline of 1/5/18 will not be effected by this extension.

Remote placements for 2 or 3 clinical credits with the following organizations*:

Students who are interested in one (or more) of these placements should submit a resume and a short statement for each placement they would like to be considered for.  If you are interested in more than one placement, please include a list of your ranked preferences.  These materials should be submitted to the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Program (OCP) by January 5, 2018 January 8, 2018 at 5PM (clinical@law.harvard.edu).

OCP will send work with these organizations to select students, and will coordinate communication once decisions have been made.  Students who are selected to work with one of the organizations above will enroll in an Independent Clinical and will need to complete an Independent Clinical Application by January 12, 2018.  Independent Clinical requirements include a 15-page academic paper due at the end of the spring semester. Students will need to secure either Professor Charles Fried or Professor Larry Lessig as their faculty sponsor for the independent clinical.

Spanish for Public Interest Lawyers – Spring 2018

Spanish for Public Interest Lawyers is a non-credit class that offers HLS students the opportunity to learn Spanish language skills in a legal context, emphasizing language most commonly used in civil and criminal legal services practice. The class will strengthen existing Spanish speaking and comprehension abilities and teach Spanish legal vocabulary to students involved in public interest legal practice. The class will introduce students to general legal Spanish vocabulary (e.g. immigration, human rights, legal aid, etc.). Students will work to develop stronger attorney-client relations by improving communication with Spanish-speaking clients.

STUDENTS MUST HAVE AT LEAST ADVANCED PROFICIENCY IN SPANISH.

To Apply: Email clinical@law.harvard.edu with the following information by 5 PM on Monday, January 15.

  • Name
  • Year (1L, 2L, 3L, LL.M.)
  • If applicable, name of the clinic or SPO you will be working with in the spring and any clinic or SPO you have previously worked with.
  • At least one paragraph, in Spanish, describing your general interests and your focus in law school.
  • Bullet points (also in Spanish) that list past or current experiences you’ve had speaking Spanish or working with Spanish-speaking client.

Students will be contacted by January 17 with the results of their application. Students who are accepted will receive more information about the class schedule and location. Classes will be held weekly. The first class will meet the week of January 22 and the last class will meet the week of April 2.

Spring 2018 Community Enterprise Project – Apply Now!

The Community Enterprise Project (Spring 2018) is a by-application division of the Transactional Law Clinics in which students engage in both direct client representation and community economic development. In addition to representing clients located near the Legal Services Center at Harvard Law School on transactional matters, CEP students work in small groups to connect with community organizations, identify organizational and community legal needs, and develop comprehensive strategies to address those needs while gaining valuable, real-world transactional law experience in a community setting.

 Apply Now!

To apply to CEP, please submit a statement of interest (no more than 200 words) and resume.

Please note that CEP students must commit to spending at least half of their clinical hours on Wednesdays and/or Thursdays at the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School in Jamaica Plain.

CEP applications should be addressed to Brian Price and Carlos Teuscher and submitted via e-mail to cteuscher@law.harvard.edu and clinical@law.harvard.edu

If accepted, students will register for 4 or 5 clinical credits through the Transactional Law Clinics and 2 course credits for the associated clinical seminar. Continuing TLC students may take CEP for 2 or 3 clinical credits and do not need to register in the associated clinical seminar.

New Winter Term Course Offered by Clinical Faculty

Lawyering for Justice in the United States

This seminar will allow students who have participated in an HLS clinic or SPO to draw on their collective experiences to explore questions about lawyering for justice in the United States in 2018. The course will take a deep dive into the why and how of systemic change and the role of lawyers in supporting it. Students will have conversations with each other and with faculty from a wide variety of HLS clinical programs, engaging in deep, guided reflection on their own past or ongoing clinical work. Students and faculty together will explore contemporary problems through a structural lens and will practice creative problem-solving geared toward identifying and evaluating potential structural solutions.

This course is by-application.  Interested students must submit: a resume (detailing their relevant legal practice experience), a short explanation of their interest in justice in the United States, how the course fits into their goals for law school and beyond, and what they hope to gain from the course.

Applications are due by Wednesday, October 25.

Read Course Catalog description

Independent Clinical with the MacArthur Justice Center Criminal Justice Appellate Clinic

Location: Washington D.C.

Applications Due: October 20, 2017

The Roderick & Solange MacArthur Justice Center in Washington, D.C. (“MJC”) is offering a two-credit winter term clinical opportunity for students who are interested in appellate litigation and passionate about criminal justice issues.

Students admitted to the clinic will travel to Washington, D.C. office for the winter term to work full-time on appeals before federal circuit courts and/or the U.S. Supreme Court, which raise important issues related to civil rights and the criminal justice system. Students will have the opportunity to make a substantial contribution to the office’s ongoing appellate cases, including performing research and draft legal analysis for briefs that will be filed in federal court. Students will gain exposure to the broader appellate process, which may include participation in client interaction and strategic decision-making, analysis of factual records, and participation in moot oral arguments (depending upon the stage of their assigned appeals). Students will also have the option of continuing the clinic in the spring semester, allowing more substantial involvement in their assigned appeals and increased exposure to appellate litigation.

MJC is one of the nation’s premier civil rights organizations and champions criminal justice reform through litigation, in areas that include police misconduct, rights of the accused, issues facing indigent prisoners, the death penalty, and the rights of detainees. The organization’s Washington, D.C. office focuses specifically on appellate litigation as a vehicle for achieving change in these areas. Examples of issues raised in MJC appeals include:

  • Unsettled questions of criminal procedure under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments (search & seizure, privilege against self-incrimination, right to a jury, right to counsel);
  • Fundamental trial rights under the Due Process Clause, including issues unique to capital trials;
  • Issues facing indigent prisoners, including the constitutional rights of prisoners to be free from cruel and unusual treatment by prison officials and access to courts;
  • Constitutional challenges to the use of solitary confinement in the prison system;
  • Challenges to certain discriminatory executive actions outside of the criminal justice system, including discriminatory practices of Immigrations and Custom Enforcement and discrimination against Muslim travelers at the border.

Students admitted to the clinic will be supervised by Amir H. Ali, who founded MJC’s Washington, D.C. office and serves as Supreme Court & Appellate Counsel. Mr. Ali will be a Lecturer at the law school during the spring term, providing opportunities to meet with students who continue the clinic during the spring semester.

Application:

Students interested in this clinic should submit a resume, an unedited writing sample, and a statement of interest (less than 300 words) that includes: (i) the student’s reason for applying to the clinic, including particular criminal justice issues the student is interested in; (ii) any prior exposure to appellate and/or criminal justice issues; (iii) whether the student would be interested in continuing the clinic during the Spring semester. Applications should be submitted to clinical@law.harvard.edu by October 20, 2017.

Limited funding for students’ travel/accommodations in Washington, D.C. will be available through the Office of Clinical Programs. Students will be notified of their application results by October 23, 2017.  Accepted students will be required to submit an Independent Clinical Application to the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs by October 31, 2017.

Students interested in applying for funding must submit the Independent Clinical Funding Application by October 31, 2017 as well.

New Markets Lab – Independent Clinical Program – January 2018

The New Markets Lab, a non-profit law and development center, will supervise an independent clinical project in January 2018 to offer students an opportunity to see firsthand the impact that the economic legal and regulatory environment has on development and economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa.  The independent clinical project will take place in both Washington, D.C. and Tanzania, where the New Markets Lab is working with partners on the ground, including the Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor of Tanzania, Tanzania Horticultural Association, and African Fertilizer and Agribusiness Partnership, among others. The program will expose students to the roles of government, business, and international institutions in interacting with and shaping the enabling environment for business and trade to encourage agricultural development at the grassroots level.

The 2018 winter term independent clinical placement will involve working with the New Markets Lab to develop a Case Study that applies understanding of law and regulation to challenges affecting enterprises in the agricultural sector. As in past years, it will also include consultations with agribusinesses, local organizations and institutions, and public sector and civil society representatives to better understand how legal and regulatory needs and challenges are dealt with in the market and how local institutions could be strengthened in this area.  As part of the program, students are also required to produce a 15-page paper that conforms to the independent clinical program guidelines and is supervised by a Faculty Sponsor.

Application 

Students interested in applying should email their resume and a short statement of interest by October 20, 2017 to Katrin Kuhlmann at kkuhlmann at newmarketslab.org

Students will be notified of their application results by October 23.

Accepted students will need to secure a faculty sponsor and submit and Independent Clinical Application to the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs by October 31, 2017.

Funding

This project is being funded through the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs, and, therefore, there is no need to submit a funding application. It is anticipated that students who are selected for the program will have their transportation and housing costs covered.

Please feel free to email Ms. Kuhlmann if you have questions about the project and/or are trying to decide whether to apply.  She can be reached at kkuhlmann at newmarketslab.org, with a copy to Shannon Keating (skeating@newmarketslab.org), or by telephone on 202-309-5564 or 617-998-1569.

Independent Clinical with the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty

Location: Washington D.C.

Applications Due: October 20, 2017

The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty is a non-profit law firm dedicated to protecting the free expression of all religious faiths. Becket seeks interns for the winter term to work in its Washington, D.C. office on a variety of Supreme Court, appellate and trial-level matters. Such work might include representing: religious ministries seeking protection from government mandates to violate their faith; Native Americans seeking the right to use eagle feathers in their religious ceremonies; prisoners seeking the right to exercise religion while incarcerated; members of the military seeking accommodations to allow them to continue to serve while meeting religious requirements for their appearance or dress; and mosques, churches, and temples challenging zoning decisions that restrict their ability to build houses of worship or other ministries.

Interested students are requested to send a resume and cover email to clinical@law.harvard.edu and Chelise Fox at cfox@becketlaw.org by 5pm on Friday October 20, 2017.

Students who are selected must submit an independent clinical application to the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs (OCP) by October 31, 2017.

Students will be eligible for housing expense reimbursement from Becket.

Students seeking reimbursements for travel will need to submit a funding request to OCP by October 31, 2017.

Upcoming Clinic Application Deadlines

Please note the upcoming clinic application deadlines:

Making Rights Real: The Ghana Project Clinic – Application Deadline Extended to August 25, 2017

Government Lawyer: Semester in Washington Clinic – Applications Due By August 25, 2017

Spanish for Public Interest Lawyers Fall 2017

Spanish for Public Interest Lawyers is a non-credit class that offers HLS students the opportunity to learn Spanish language skills in a legal context, emphasizing language most commonly used in civil and criminal legal services practice. The class will strengthen existing Spanish speaking and comprehension abilities and teach Spanish legal vocabulary to students involved in public interest legal practice. The class will introduce students to general legal Spanish vocabulary (e.g. immigration, human rights, legal aid, etc.). Students will work to develop stronger attorney-client relations by improving communication with Spanish-speaking clients.

STUDENTS MUST HAVE AT LEAST ADVANCED PROFICIENCY IN SPANISH.

To Apply: Email clinical@law.harvard.edu with the following information by 5 PM on Wednesday, August 30:

  • Name
  • Year (1L, 2L, 3L, LL.M.)
  • If applicable, name of the clinic or SPO you will be working with in the spring and any clinic or SPO you have previously worked with.
  • At least one paragraph, in Spanish, describing your general interests and your focus in law sch
  • Bullet points (also in Spanish) that list past or current experiences you’ve had speaking Spanish or working with Spanish-speaking client

Students will be contacted by September 1 with the results of their application. Students who are accepted will receive more information about the class schedule and location. Classes will be held weekly. The first class will meet the week of September 11 and the last class will meet the week of November 13.

Apply Today for the 2018 HLS Semester in Washington Program!

Deadline: August 25, 2017

Apply Now

The program is an extraordinary opportunity to work at the intersection of government, policy, and practice while pursuing your particular interests. Clinic participants spend the spring semester (or winter & spring semesters) living in Washington and working as legal interns in federal offices in the Executive, Legislative, or Judicial Branches. The placements, in offices where lawyers provide legal advice and assistance on policy, legislative, or regulatory matters, are developed collaboratively between the students and the Program Director to match to the students’ interests.

Previous placements have included the White House Counsel’s Office, the Justice Department’s Civil Rights, Criminal, and Environmental Divisions, the Department of Defense’s Office of General Counsel, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Senate Judiciary, Armed Services and Energy Committees, and many more.

To learn more about the program, take a look at the clinic’s blog, where you can find information on the course portion of the program and much more.

If you have any questions or want to discuss how the clinic might help further your goals, you can email the Clinic Director, Jonathan Wroblewski, at jwroblewski@law.harvard.edu or give him a call at 202-514-4730. He’d love to hear from you!

The initial application deadline for the Clinic is August 25, 2017Apply today through the online application process!

Upcoming Clinical Application Deadlines

Please note the upcoming clinical application deadlines!

April 10, 2017 – Public Education Policy & Consulting Clinic (deadline extended)
April 10, 2017 – Community Enterprise Project of the Transactional Law Clinics

New Clinic: Democracy and the Rule of Law Clinic

The Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs is announcing a new clinic, Democracy and the Rule of Law Clinic.

Please visit the clinic webpage and read the course catalog description for more information.

2017-2018 Clinical Registration

Fall, Winter, and Spring Semesters

March 29 (9am) – March 30 (5pm)
Visit our website for more information about clinical registration preferencing.

Please note that there are a handful of by-application clinics with rapidly approaching application deadlines:

  • Public Education Policy and Consulting Clinic (Fall or Spring) – March 27, 2017
  • Government Lawyer: United States Attorney Clinic (Fall or Spring) – March 27, 2017
  • Semester in Human Rights Clinic (Fall) – April 7, 2017
  • Community Enterprise Project of the Transactional Law Clinics (Fall or Spring) – April 21, 2017

Please do not hesitate to contact us (clinical@law.harvard.edu) or stop by our office (WCC 3085) with any questions.  OCP offers general clinic advising as well as more individualized logistical/preferencing advice.

2017-18 Clinical Registration: Info Series

To help HLS students with the upcoming clinical registration at the end of March, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs has organized a a series of info sessions, ClinicTalks, designed to help students learn about the work in each of the clinics. Faculty Directors as well as current and former clinical students will attend to help answer questions about the clinic and the clinical registration process.

All sessions are scheduled from 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm and food will be served at each event.

View Full Calendar

Clinical Advising
Students can schedule an individual advising appointment with one of our advisers here.
OCP also holds student walk-in hours every Friday from 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm.

Spring 2017 Clinical Opportunities – Deadline January 13 @ midnight

Dear Students,

The general clinic add/drop deadline for the spring 2017 semester is tomorrow, January 13, at 11:59:59PM.

There are a few spring clinics that currently have open seats available.

Interested students may log in to Helios and add themselves to these clinics (in the “Add/Drop” section of Helios) – any open seats will be claimed on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Students have until midnight tomorrow to enroll in one of the below clinics:

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or run into any issues trying to enroll in one of the above clinics through Helios!

Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs
WCC 3085 | 617.495.5202 |  clinical at law.harvard.edu

Spanish for Public Interest Lawyers – Spring 2017

Description

Spanish for Public Interest Lawyers is a non-credit class that offers HLS students the opportunity to learn Spanish language skills in a legal context, emphasizing language most commonly used in civil and criminal legal services practice.

The class will strengthen existing Spanish speaking and comprehension abilities and teach Spanish legal vocabulary to students involved in public interest legal practice. The class will introduce students to general legal Spanish vocabulary (e.g. immigration, human rights, legal aid, etc.). Students will work to develop stronger attorney-client relations by improving communication with Spanish-speaking clients.

 Student Requirements

  • Students must have at least advanced proficiency in Spanish.
  • This class is not for credit, but regular attendance is required.
  • The class will meet for 10 weeks, for two hours each week (day & time TBD).
  • Class participation is vital. Language practice and listening to Spanish between classes is encouraged.

 Enrollment

  • 2L and 3L students currently in a direct services clinic or SPO who have at least advanced proficiency in Spanish will receive priority.
  • Students meeting the criteria will be accepted through a randomized selection process.

 To Apply

Email clinical at law.harvard.edu with the following information by 5 PM on Tuesday, January 10.

  • Name
  • Year (1L, 2L, 3L, LL.M.)
  • If applicable, name of the clinic or SPO you will be working with in the spring and any clinic or SPO you have previously worked with.
  • At least one paragraph, in Spanish, describing your general interests and your focus in law school.
  • Bullet points (also in Spanish) that list past or current experiences you’ve had speaking Spanish or working with Spanish-speaking clients.

Students will be contacted by January 13 with the results of their application. Students who are accepted will receive more information about the class schedule and location. Classes will be held weekly. The first class will meet the week of January 23 and the last class will meet the week of April 10.

Clinical Students Awarded Public Service Venture Fund Fellowships

Clinics at Harvard Law School not only provide students with opportunities for hands-on legal practice with robust supervision but many have a strong public service component. So it’s no surprise that members of the innaugural class of Public Service Venture Fund Fellows have been shaped by their clinical work in a wide range of practice areas, including human rights, consumer protection, housing, employment, cyberlaw, and immigration. Here’s wishing them the best of luck in their new endeavors!

Events: Nov 9 through Nov 15

We hope you will join us for some or all of these events this weekend and next week:

What: Coordination of Sandy Efforts for Students
When: Fri, Nov 9, 12–1pm
Where: WCC Milstein East C
Details: HLS Events Calendar

What: Project No One Leaves: Community Responses to the Foreclosure Crisis Conference
When: Fri, Nov 9 – Sun, Nov 11
Where: Harvard Law School (various locations)
Details: Project No One Leaves website

What: Advocacy for Boston-Area Veterans: Unmet Needs and Pro Bono Opportunities
When: Mon, Nov 12, 12–1pm
Where: WCC Milstein West B
Details: HLS Events Calendar

What: Knowing Your Legal Rights: A Seminar for Military Veterans and Families
When: Wed, Nov 14, 5–7pm
Where: WCC 1010
Details: HLS Events Calendar

What: Negotiation in the News: Negotiating a Ceasefire in Syria
When: Thu, Nov 15, 12–1pm
Where: WCC 3012
Details: HLS Events Calendar

Event: Mandatory Clinical Ethics Training & Reception for Students

What
Mandatory Clinical Ethics Training & Reception

When
Fri, Sep 21, 4-6pm (Check-in at 3:45pm)

For Whom
HLS Students enrolled in their first clinic in Fall 2012 or Winter 2013

Where
Milstein East, WCC

Featured Speakers
Dean Martha Minow
Chief Justice Margaret Marshall
Lisa Dealy, Assistant Dean of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs
Shaun Goho, Clinical Instructor, Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic
Jeremy McClane, Lecturer on Law, Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program
Maureen McDonagh, Lecturer on Law and Clinical Instructor, WilmerHale Legal Services Center, Post-Foreclosure Eviction/Housing Law Clinic

Details
Welcome to the start of a new clinical year! This session will introduce you to your new role as a student attorney and explain your basic ethical obligations. Topics covered will include confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and due diligence. As a reminder, all HLS students enrolled in their first clinic in Fall 2012 or Winter 2013 are required to attend.

Students in attendance will receive a confirmation slip that they must provide to their clinic supervisor. Students unable to attend the training must contact their clinic supervisor and the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs ( clinical at law.harvard.edu).

Please note that laptops are not permitted at the event.

If you have any questions, please contact  clinical at law.harvard.edu.

Opportunity: DOJ Independent Clinical

Are you a JD 2L or 3L interested in counterterrorism policy, prosecution, and related national security matters? If so, you may be interested in a independent clinical opportunity to perform research and analytical work with the Counterterrorism Section and the Office of Law and Policy of the National Security Division of the Department of Justice.  Professors Heymann and Rosenberg act as faculty sponsors. The terms for the 2012-2013 program are detailed in the program’s Memorandum of Understanding.  This is an extraordinary opportunity for both public service (satisfies the pro bono requirement) and professional training!

Students perform clinical work during the Fall and Spring, and possibly in the Winter term in the unlikely event of an emergency project (only if work does not conflict with other Winter Term obligations). Admission is selective and based on a student’s academic performance, relevant experience, professional recommendations, and interest in the subject matter. Enrollment is limited to no more than five students. All students must satisfy the security clearance requirements for the Department of Justice Volunteer Internship Program, sign a confidentiality agreement, and attend a mandatory orientation session in Cambridge at the beginning of the Fall semester.

Two clinical credits (1 Fall credit + 1 Spring credit) are awarded through the Independent Clinical Work Program. Grading is Credit/Fail. Due to the highly confidential nature of this program, students have the independent clinical final paper and weekly emails waived.  Students can only take one clinical per term.  Review additional information about this program by reading the Memorandum of Understanding.

To apply, submit your most recent academic transcript and resume to Kim Peterson ( kpeterso at law.harvard.edu), Assistant to David Rosenberg, on or before 4 p.m. on June 22, 2012.

Snapshot: Admitted Students Weekend

Clinical students and instructors chat with newly admitted students during a panel on clinical opportunities at HLS

This past weekend, 190 admitted students visited Harvard Law School for a busy few days of touring the campus, meeting with professors and administrators, attending sample classes, learning about housing and financial aid, and getting to know one another.

During two panels, clinical students and instructors chatted about the wide-ranging clinical opportunities at HLS, which include 27 clinics, 10 student practice organization, and numerous pro bono opportunities. Here are a few fun stats:

  • 74% of student complete a clinical before graduation
  • HLS students completed 828 clinical placements in 2011-12
  • Students worked in 27 different clinics with 60 different supervising faculty and instructors in 17 different countries
  • The Class of 2011 averaged 628 hours of pro bono service
  • Since the Pro Bono requirement was instituted in 2002, students have completed over 1 million pro bono hours

If you have any questions about anything related to clinical opportunities or the pro bono requirement, please don’t hesitate to contact us!

Snapshot: Clinical Fair

Tyler Giannini (R), Human Rights Program Clinical Director and Clinical Professor, chats with a student during last week’s Clinical Fair (photo courtesy of HRP)

Thanks to all the clinics and students who made last week’s Clinical Fair a success! While Clinical Registration only comes once each year, the Office of Clinical and Pro Bono Programs is available year-round to answer your clinical and pro bono questions. Don’t be shy about getting in touch!