About the Cyberlaw Clinic

Harvard Law School‘s Cyberlaw Clinic, based at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, provides high-quality, pro-bono legal services to appropriate clients on issues relating to the Internet, technology, and intellectual property. Students enhance their preparation for high-tech practice and earn course credit by working on real-world litigation, client counseling, advocacy, and transactional / licensing projects and cases. The Clinic strives to help clients achieve success in their activities online, mindful of (and in response to) existing law. The Clinic also works with clients to shape the law’s development through policy and advocacy efforts. The Cyberlaw Clinic was the first of its kind, and it continues its tradition of innovation in its areas of practice. The Clinic works independently, with law students supervised by experienced and licensed attorneys.  In some cases, the Clinic collaborates with counsel throughout the country to take advantage of regional or substantive legal expertise.

From the Blog

Congratulations, HLS Class of 2017!

Version 2This past Wednesday — May 24th, 2017 — marked Class Day at Harvard Law School, which takes place each year one day before the University-wide commencement ceremonies.  It’s one of our favorite days of the year here at the Cyberlaw Clinic, because it gives us the chance to host an annual get-together for graduating Clinic alums and their families and friends.  

Student Commentary on the Clinic’s Internet Jurisdiction Work

asnThe HLS Clinical and Pro Bono programs blog currently features a post by spring 2017 Cyberlaw Clinic student (and graduating Harvard Law School 3L) Alicia Solow-Niederman.  The piece highlights Alicia’s work this semester with Clinic Assistant Director Vivek Krishnamurthy and our friend and Clinic advisor Nani Jansen Reventlow. Alicia was part of a team that helped to tackle some complex questions about online jurisdiction, preparing a working paper along with student Javier Careaga Franco (LL.M ’17) entitled “Here, There, or Everywhere?.” The paper offers a methodology and taxonomy aimed at clarifying principles to govern the geographic scope of orders to remove online content.

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Commonwealth v. Augustine

The Cyberlaw Clinic filed an amicus brief (pdf) on behalf of the Electronic Frontier Foundation in the case, Commonwealth v. Augustine, in the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts. The case concerns whether law enforcement officers can obtain someone’s cell phone location data without first obtaining a warrant. The brief argues that the protections of the US and Massachusetts Constitutions prohibit law enforcement from warrantlessly poring over records of people’s movements. Law enforcement officers must demonstrate probable cause to a neutral member of the judicial branch and act according to a valid warrant before such intense intrusion into people’s privacy is appropriate. Without demonstrating reason to believe that a crime has occurred and that the privacy intrusion is likely to provide specified information relating to the crime, the government has not met its burden.