Speeding on the Subway

subway-speedtest

At the uptown end of the 59th Street/Columbus Circle subway platform there hangs from the ceiling a box with three disks on fat stalks, connected by thick black cables that run to something unseen in the downtown direction. Knowing a few things about radio and how it works, I saw that and thought, Hmm… That has to be a cell. I wonder whose? So I looked at my phone and saw my T-Mobile connection had five dots (that’s iPhone for bars), and said LTE as well. So I ran @Ookla‘s Speedtest app and got the results above.

Pretty good, no?

Sure, you’re not going to binge-watch anything there, or upload piles of pictures to some cloud, but you can at tug on your e-tether to everywhere for a few minutes. Nice to have.

So I’m wondering, @TMobile… Are those speeds the max one should expect from LTE when your local cell is almost as close as your hat?

And how long before you put these along the rest of the A/B/C/D Train routes? (The only other one I know is at 72nd, a B/C stop.) Or the rest of the subway system? In Boston too? BART? (Gotta hit all my cities.)

Meanwhile, thanks for taking care of my Main Stop in midtown.

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2 comments

  1. Doc Searls’s avatar

    FWIW, this piece so far (the day after it ran) got about 300 reads here and 160 on Medium — and that’s with a recommendation from @Ev himself. (Much appreciated, that.) A far cry in either place from the old days when the blog had many thousands of RSS readers, and readers of posts, per day. But I don’t care. It’s still early. :-)

    Oh, by the way, my photos on Flickr run in the 6,000-20,000 range per day. But then I’ve got ~ 65,000 photos there.

  2. Mike Warot’s avatar

    I used to have an RSS reader, but lost that in my flight away from the increasing horrow show that is Windows. I just typed in your web address… and viola… one of your readers.

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