Archive for the 'lawyer' Category

Statutory Damages Flexible: Tenenbaum Case Updated

Represented by Professor Charles Nesson, Joel Tenenbaum pulled one back in his P2P downloading case, in which he was sentenced $675,000 dollars statutory damages to the copyright owners.
I was sitting in the hearing when Professor Nesson presented his move of either placing a new trial or granting a remittitur. Briefly, Charlie’s argument is: 675,000 dollars is unconstitutionally high, and therefore instructing the jury that maximum amount should be a mistrial.
After five months awaiting, Judge Nancy Gertner agreed Joel’s motion of remittitur by reducing the damages Joel owes to $67,500 – one-tenth of the original one. In her ruling, she wrote:

Reducing the jury’s $675,000 award also sends another no less important message: The Due Process Clause does not merely protect large corporations, like BMW and State Farm, from grossly excessive punitive awards. It also protects ordinary people like Joel Tenenbaum.

Still, for each song, Joel has to pay $2,250, and if my memory serves, upon what is the appropriate amount of damages, “30 Dollars”, Charlie said after the hearing.

Chinese Posts at BlawgDog from Dec. 14th to Dec. 20th: English Abstracts

From December 14th to December 20th, 2009, seven new Chinese entries have been posted to the Blawgdog. Here are the brief one-sentence abstracts for the English readers’ reference:

  • Top Ten 2009 Copyright News in China
    Chosen by the China Copyright Journal. I added the referral links to those news that had been commented at blawgdog.
  • It’s Wrong not because of Burdening the Duty of Carefulness, but because of Providing Joint Liability
    Some Beijing academicians oppose Article 36 of the drafting China’s Tort Law Bill by saying it should not burdens the ISPs the duty of carefulness. I clarified in this essay that the key problem of Article 36 is wrongfully providing a joint liability to the ISPs. 
  • Turning Exemption Provisions to the Criterion of Liability
    This article is also about Article 36 of the drafting China’s Tort Law Bill. I noted that, in the legal transplantation in recent years in China, the exemption provisions in foreign legislations are often (intentionally or mistakenly) shifted to be the criteria of liability. For example, Sec. 230 of the CDA in US is an exemption arrangement, while Article 36 is a criterion of liability; another example can be the safe harbour to the ISPs in the DMCA (on the so-called red flag test) was wrongfully transplanted to be a criterion of liability.
  • Xinhua News Agency: China will not Resolve the un-recorded Domain Names
    This entry has been translated into English at here.
  • I See the Historical Day
    This post mentioned the latest news: the Ministry of Industry and Information is proposing that the foreign enterprises “must register domain names from Chinese registrars if the names are used for business in China. The domain names oversea registered shall not be used in the businesses toward China.” And admitted the state will “supervise the domain names that launches the website oversea, and take measures to control the foreign name registrars”.
  • Reprint: Two Articles by Mr Youxi Chen
    Chen is a lawyer, and the vice Chair of the Committee of the Constitutional Law and Human Rights in China Bar Association. He published two articles at his website blaming the newspaper misleading the mass in reporting the news that lawyers are arrested in ChongQin. He argues that the Chinese lawyers are in very hard social environment now.
  • China IP Weekly Newsletter
    Writen and edited by Luckie Hong, a co-author of BlawgDog, reporting the latest news in IP Law. This issue includes SNDA Literature (NASDAQ: SNDA’s subcompany) annouced suing Baidu for over one million in infingement of copyright, and the new development of Netac v. Sony, and other 7 latest news.

Paper Abstract – By John BURKE and Hao DONG

Competition Policy and Updating Vehicles for the Delivery of Legal Services: The New South Wales Experience and Lessons for Hong Kong

John BURKE* & Hao DONG**

Accepted by SSCI Journal: Asian and Pacific Law Review

Abstract: Competition policy has been applied to the legal profession in NSW for over a decade. The introduction of a broad reaching competition law to Hong Kong is currently being considered there. This article will review two key aspects of competition policy in NSW, the introduction of incorporated legal practices (‘ILPs’) and multi-disciplinary legal practices (‘MDPs’). In particular, it will explore the degree to which these changes have altered the traditional professional model of legal practice in NSW and the benefits and costs of these effects. These lessons are relevant to legal profession in Hong Kong because proposals in a public consultation paper issued by the Commerce and Economic Development Bureau on 6 May 2008 envisage that competition policy would apply prima facie to all business models. Furthermore, existing (but dormant) legislation permitting ILPs and recommendations to allow MDPs make these changes to the landscape of legal practice a real possibility. This article will conclude that such changes should be viewed with caution in Hong Kong and perhaps other solutions sought to improve the efficiency and productivity of the legal system and access to justice in that jurisdiction.
——————————————————————————–

* Teaching Fellow, City University of Hong Kong. BA (Macquarie University), Dip. Law (SAB), LLM (UTS), Graduate Certificate in University Teaching and Learning (Charles Sturt University).
** Lecturer in Yunnan University (PRC), PhD Candidate in City University of Hong Kong. The authors would also like to thank Professor Christopher Roper and Professor Gino Dal Pont’s careful proof reading, as well as very helpful insights provided by Michael Sandor on the current law of Hong Kong, who refereed this article.

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