Archive for March 26th, 2005

Careful What You Ask For Dept.

20

A
new chewing gum, which its makers claim can help enhance breasts, is proving
to be a big hit in Japan.

The makers claim Bust-Up gum can also help improve circulation, reduce stress
and fight aging, if chewed three or four times a day.

The gum releases compounds, contained in an extract from a plant called Pueraria
mirifica that helps to keep the muscle tissue in good order.

Pueraria mirifica, also known as Kwao Krua, is a species found in Thailand and
Myanmar and has long been used by hill tribe people as a traditional medicine.

The plant’s underground tubers contain a number of chemicals called phytoestrogens
– natural compounds that mimic the effects of the female sex hormone estrogen.

Makers of the gum cite tests carried out by Thailand’s Chulalongkorn University
that found Pueraria mirifica therapy was able to enhance breast size by 80 percent.

Further tests carried out in England found that the plant had a beneficial effect
on the skin and hair as well.

from China Daily

Granola Heads Vs.Fruit Loopies at Harvard

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Angry cereal fans are lashing out after
Harvard University cleared its dining halls this school year of brand-name
cereals, such as Fruit Loops and Cap’n Crunch, and swapped them for less
expensive, apparently healthier options like Tootie Fruities and Colossal
Crunch.

For Harvard sophomore Allison Kessler, it’s annoying to pay more than $4,000
for a meal plan that scrimps on her favorite breakfast foods. Particularly
since, Kessler, like many college students, eats cereal several times
a day.
”I used to eat Lucky Charms for lunch and dinner," she said. ”The
fake stuff gets real soggy, and I’ve just stopped eating cereal. This is
not fair."

Harvard officials say student surveys showed an interest in healthier,
organic products, and brand-name cereals have been slow to move in that
direction. At the same time, the major cereal companies are raising prices
about 8 percent to 10 percent per year, more than double the rate for natural
and lesser-known cereals, according to Jami M. Snyder, a spokeswoman for
Harvard University Dining Services. ”We have a responsibility to spend
their dollars wisely," Snyder said.

Harvard has reduced its six-figure cereal budget by 25 percent this academic
year since shelving most brand-name cereals, including Apple Jacks, Cheerios,
and Frosted Flakes.

Sure, and if they replaced their supply of homoginized
Vitamin D enriched milk with organic goat’s milk, we bet they could reduce
their milk budget by at least 75%!

from the
Boston Globe