Archive for November 11th, 2005

Latest from the Ministry of Truth

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WASHINGTON — The House Intelligence
Committee will look into a possible leak of classified information about
secret CIA prisons but will not reopen its 2003 inquiry into prewar intelligence
on Iraq.

As calls for intelligence-related reviews grow on Capitol Hill, Representative
Peter Hoekstra, Republican of Michigan, said yesterday that his committee
will study several specific leaks of classified information, including
a Nov. 2 Washington Post story that discussed the existence of secret CIA
prisons overseas.

The story said the ”black sites" were in eight countries, including
democracies in Eastern Europe.

Hoekstra would not confirm the story’s accuracy or whether the prisons
exist.

Absolutely Orwellian! In the face of criminal and possibly
treasonous malfeasance and misdirection at the highest levels of government
which have led this great country to the brink of a historic disaster
and already cost thousands of American lives, the Republicans in the
House are only worried
about who leaked the fact that our government is maintaining secret torture
prisons around the world for the expressed intent of violating US law
and international treaties we have signed and pledged to honor.

Honor, wherefore art thou! We ache with longing to be
able to once again feel clean and proud and honored to call ourself
an American. It seems so long ago, so sad, so sad……

from the
Boston Globe

 

Password Crackers Utilize Hash

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A trio of entrepreneurial hackers hope
to do for the business of password cracking what Google did for search
and, in the process, may remove the last vestiges of security from many
password systems.

Over the past two years, three security enthusiasts from the United States
and Europe set a host of computers to the task of creating eleven enormous
tables of data that can be used to look up common passwords.

The tables
– totaling 500GB – form the core data of a technique known as rainbow
cracking, which uses vast dictionaries of data to let anyone reverse
the process
of creating hashes – the statistically unique codes that, among other
duties, are used to obfuscate a user’s password.Last week, the trio went
public
with their service. Called RainbowCrack Online, the site allows anyone
to pay a subscription fee and submit password hashes for cracking.

This is no different that making skeleton keys or
selling kits that allow folks to pirate cable signals.  People
who care about or need secure systems will start using passwords that
rainbow tables
can’t crack. However, trying to pass themselves off as a legitimate
business and selling cracks from their web site, lacking a number of
legitimate customers, smacks us as about as smart as selling the other
kind of crack.

from the
Register