Yum!

September 1st, 2011

Just updating one of our RedHat servers. Yum is great. It even updates itself.

Kinda creepy, actually. Like it’s trying to better itself. Becoming more than what it is…

rev 2000

August 31st, 2011

Spinal just hit revision #2000. Adam and I are going to get beers after work Thursday to celebrate. Feel free to join in.

Here at RCS, our main Django app (Spinal) uses key=value pairs to generalize our database. Which is great, because you can shove anything in there. However, it makes Django queries difficult. For example, if you want to get all sessions after a certain date, you might have to do something like this:


str_month_start = str(start_datetime)
rulsessions = ResourceUsageLogSession.objects.filter(resourceusagelogsessionkvpair__key='start_datetime', resourceusagelogsessionkvpair__val__gte=str_month_start)

(Aside: Remember, since everything is in string form, you can’t compare dates, you need to first convert dates into Y-m-d format and then compare items alpha-numerically.)

However, if you want to get the all of the dates before a certain date, you can’t use .exclude()

This won't work!
str_month_start = str(start_datetime)
rulsessions = ResourceUsageLogSession.objects.exclude(resourceusagelogsessionkvpair__key='start_datetime', resourceusagelogsessionkvpair__val__gte=str_month_start)

The above code will exclude on both lookup fields, not on their intersection. Instead, you have to filter on the logical inverse of the first statement:

str_month_start = str(start_datetime)
rulsessions = ResourceUsageLogSession.objects.filter(resourceusagelogsessionkvpair__key='start_datetime', resourceusagelogsessionkvpair__val__lt=str_month_start)

What’s the lesson here? Databases (and web frameworks built on top of them) are best when used with standardized fields, and generic models may lead to some tough coding.

666

August 30th, 2011

Adam is stoked because we ran a billing script and it returned 666 usage objects.

Rock on, Desecrator!