f/k/a archives . . . real opinions & real haiku

November 16, 2005

the plot reserved for me

Filed under: pre-06-2006 — David Giacalone @ 6:00 pm


Autumn cold; curtained window

of the fortuneteller

softly glowing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rainfall pelts the roof–

smell of fresh pine chips

from the pinto’s empty stall

 

 

 

ekgG

 

 

 

 








autumn evening —

yellow leaves cover

the plot reserved for me

 

 

 



“autumn cold” & “autumn evening” – Shadwell Hills (Birch Prees Press, 2002)           

 “Autumn evening” — A New Resonance 2Modern Haiku XXX:2 




 








Indian Summer —

a squirrel tips over 

the rock salt bag


[Nov. 16, 2005]

 

 

 potluck


tiny check  We are again eschewing all A3G/UTR Talk, but Evan and Howard

both have it covered.

 

 

quarterback  Methinks Ted Frank is over-reaching with his suggestion that Ralph

Nader’s complaint over the Eagles cutting Terrell Owens is representative

of the state of consumer fraud jurisprudence.  Ted alleges that Nader is

“arguing that the Philadelphia Eagles’ decision to suspend star wide receiver

Terrell Owens . . . is consumer fraud because season-ticket holders had an

expectation that Owens would play for the team.”  In his Overlawyered.com

post, he continues:


“(But what about all those New York Times subscribers who

expected to read Judy Miller?) The suggestion rises to self-

parody, though it exhibits the absurdity of modern consumer

fraud law in that it isn’t crazier than suits that actually succeed.”

 


tiny check At Slate, Robert S. Boynton has a balanced article on whether junior

academics can afford to be opinionated webloggers.  “Attack of the

Career-Killer Blogs,” Nov. 16, 2005, via Bashman).   I believe too many

law professors pull their punches on weblogs on any topic that might

interfere with appointment to academic chairs, political plum positions,

or prized judicial seats.

 

                                                                                                                                 go out long quarterback flip

 

2 Comments

  1. I don’t think I’m overreaching. Consumer fraud attorneys get millions in settlements for allegations as insane as that one. While it’s unlikely that any judge will intervene, it’s not for lack of supporting precedent that a case would be dismissed.

    Comment by Ted — November 17, 2005 @ 12:34 pm

  2. I don’t think I’m overreaching. Consumer fraud attorneys get millions in settlements for allegations as insane as that one. While it’s unlikely that any judge will intervene, it’s not for lack of supporting precedent that a case would be dismissed.

    Comment by Ted — November 17, 2005 @ 12:34 pm

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