f/k/a archives . . . real opinions & real haiku

January 19, 2006

we should make the word “blawg” obsolete

Filed under: pre-06-2006 — David Giacalone @ 4:08 pm

I just posted a lengthy essay on the above

topic.  It’s in the form of an Open Letter to

the Editor of Blawg Review.     Go here.

 

This is the opening: 

 





“Whether or not a neologism continues

as part of the language depends on many

factors, probably the most important of which

is acceptance by the public.”

                                     WikiWhat / Answers.com

 


“Words become obsolete or archaic for any

number of Reasons.”

                        Christopher Orlet –

                          Existential Journalist

 


Dear Blawg Review Editor [“Ed“]:

 

I’ve come to know you as an articulate lover of the English language. 

As far as I know, you don’t say “lawgic” or “lawnguage,” drink “lawtte,” 

bill clawents, or use Blawk‘s Dictionary. You don’t call lazy associates

 “slawkers,”  and have yet to dub Jack Abramoff a “lawbbyist.”

 

You’re usually a skeptic and no fan of “cute.”  If linguists called their

weblogs “blings” (or argonauts called theirs “blargs”), you’d probably 

smirk.  But, note: no one else uses such verbal oddities in naming their

weblogs.  So, Ed, why do you, and other otherwise-serious members of

the legal community, refer to law-oriented weblogs as “blawgs?”  Why

take an insider pun by a popular lawyer-webdiva (which should have been

passed around and admired briefly as a witty one-off) and help perpet-

uate it?

 

thesaurus   For much more Go here.


update (Jan. 20, 2006): The Editor of Blawg Review has responded

to this posting by acting as if the issue were whether one has a

right to make new words.   Our point is, of course, that all words

are not created equal and that “blawg” fails virtually all of the tests 

for a useful word that is worth keeping and, more important, worth 

using (especially by a profession accused so often of using words

that confuse and that set it apart).  [more inside]

 


what my words can’t explain —
the autumn sun
on your back

 

 

 

 

 

 


coyote moon small  

 




a coyote call

goes unanswered

evening star

 

 









back again


the driftwood thrown


with all my strength


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

explaining it,


my life sounds frivolous


holly berries

 

 

 

 

 



what my words can’t explain” – The Heron’s Nest

“a coyote call” – Acron No. 6 (Spring 2001)

“explaining it” – acorn haiku magazine


“back again” – pegging the wind, 2002; acorn

 

                                                                                                               dictionaryN

 

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