Archive for the 'Women’s Work' Category

Occupy Boston: You Can’t Evict an Idea

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Occupy Boston goes to court tomorrow. A Temporary Restraining Order prevents the Boston Police from removing the tents from Dewey Square Park. Superior Court Judge Francis Mcintyre ruled that tents constitute symbolic free speech. The hearing will determine if the TRO will be replaced by a Preliminary Injunction or simply expire leaving the BPD to do their will. The National Lawyers Guild lawyer representing us is optimistic. Another member of the Guild told me, “the case will be over.”  Folks went out tonight to rally public support. @gvmiii tweeted using a photohost with a less than obvious “intellectual property” regime.

You Can’t Evict an Idea

@LejlaOWS  Boston University ’15 tweeted.

Current police presence at #OccupyBoston on Twitpic    #OccupyBoston march on Twitpic    So many people at the #OccupyBoston march! #ows on Twitpic
#OccupyBoston march. Join us! on Twitpic    Share this widely. This is what patriotism looks like! #occup... on Twitpic    #OccupyBoston marching on Boylston on Twitpic

This is what alternative media looks like.

 

Sprucing Up

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Tree Work at Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute

Tree Work at Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute

For a celebration:

Banner above the door is a recent addition.

Banner above the door is a recent addition.

Suffragists First

The origin of the Schlesinger Library dates to 1943, when Maude Wood Park, an early congressional lobbyist and suffrage activist, made an initial gift of books, papers, and journals documenting the women’s suffrage movement. The library¹s collections have expanded beyond suffrage and now include a wide range of materials documenting the history of women in America. Today, the library contains more than 3,000 discrete collections and nearly 90,000 volumes.

Maude Wood Park [Radcliffe 1898] was among other things, the first President of the League of Women Voters. Everybody on the internet believes that she was one of only two women in a class of 72 that were in favor of the vote for women. Nobody on the internet knows how we know this. I know who to ask.