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Rosenberg Gallery Catalogues added

The Fine Arts library recently purchased two rare exhibition catalogues from Paul Rosenberg’s gallery in Paris.  Les grandes influences au dix-neuvieme siècle, published in 1925, is one of the earliest of Rosenberg’s documented shows.  Exposition d’oeuvres recentes de Henri-Matisse, is from 1936. Rosenberg was Matisse’s dealer and an early champion; this illustrated catalogue is a valuable addition our holdings of the bibliography on this artist.

Paul Rosenberg (1881-1959) opened his gallery on the Rue La Boetie in 1911. He moved to New York in 1940, and Paul Rosenberg & Co. continued to operate after his death. Rosenberg’s papers are in the archives of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The Fine Arts Library now owns over three dozen of the galleries’ publications.

Occuprint Portfolio 2012 Acquired

The Fine Arts Library recently acquired a portfolio of 31 prints selected to represent the global Occupy movement.  The works were selected from among hundreds submitted by Occupy groups worldwide and exhibited online by a group called Occuprint; the project supports their educational outreach program. The non-profit Booklyn Artists Alliance helped select the posters to be included, supported the printing and is distributing these works.  This group of posters joins several other graphic portfolios added to the collection in recent years including two from the Justseeds Artists’ Collaborative Migration now and Resourced.

Spanish costume book

The library recently acquired a rare 19th century imprint: Costumbres y trajes de la edad media Cristiana y del renacimiento  (Barcelona : Libreria de Joaquin Verdaguer, 1852-1854). The book contains historical and descriptive essays and thirty-four hand-painted engravings of various figures in Western European medieval costume, such as this image of jousting knights. As was the custom at the time, the plates appear to have been created by various artists, some French and some Spanish, and assembled from different sources and then colored for the press. Verdaguer’s interests were apparently wide; his other contemporary titles include books on Chinese landscapes and calligraphy. This is one of the only three copies found in North America.

Listen, listen : a new artist’s book

The Fine Arts Library has just purchased a copy of the limited edition Listen, listen : Adadam Agofomma : honoring the legacy of Koo Nimo produced by the book artist Mary Hark as a tribute to a Ghanaian musician. Listen, listen is a visual interpretation of  Nimo’s ‘palmwine music’. Hark uses native materials such as maize, plantain leaves, and papyrus to make the paper which is printed in a letterpress studio in Minnesota and finally bound in her own studio in Madison, Wisconsin.  The book incorporates recordings as well as prints by Ghanaian artist Atta Kwami.

‘Listen, listen’ fits into the library’s mission to collect a variety of artists’ books. Our artists’ books collection features personal, cultural, and political statements made by international artists working in a book or book-like format. For more information on this collection, look here: http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/finearts/collections/artists_books.cfm

Listen, listen fits into the library’s mission to collect a variety of artists’ books. Our artists’ books collection features personal, cultural, and political statements made by international artists working in a book or book-like form.

Russian Modernist Journal

In 2003, the Tretiakov Gallery in Moscow commissioned a facsimile reprint of the single issue of the early Russian modernist journal ‘Unovis’. This journal, organized by the Russian artist Kazimir Malevich and produced in 1920 by the staff and students of the Vitebsk Art School, is one of the principal forms of documentation of the art movement of the same name that flourished in Moscow from 1919 to 1922.

This facsimile edition also includes a book of essays on the movement and its makers (in Russian) and a reproduction of a full-color poster.

 

Ben Shahn at Harvard

Ben Shahn at Harvard Commencement 1957

 

The Fine Arts Library holds the collection of Stephen Lee Taller devoted to the American artist Ben Shahn (1898-1969). The Archive contains many thousands of items related to the artist’s work, including books written by and illustrated by Ben Shahn, magazines in which his work was featured, exhibition and auction sales catalogues, commercial work (book jackets, record jackets, advertisements), dissertations, and newspaper clippings. An image inventory attempts to record every know work by the artist.

A separate portion of the Taller Archive held by the Harvard Art Museums includes drawings and graphic work.  The Museums also hold Shahn’s entire archive of photographic negatives.   All of those works may be viewed in the Museums’ collections database.

Shahn presented the 1956-57 Charles Eliot Norton lectures, published as The Shape of Content.  He also received an honorary degree from the University in 1957.

Camerawoman revealed

Capital, San Pedro la Rua cloister, Estella, Spain. Arthur Kingsley Porter Collection.

The Fine Arts Library holds a collection of over 10,000 photographs of European medieval monuments taken by Professor Arthur Kingsley Porter (1883-1933)  in the 1920s.   The Porter collection includes negatives as well as prints and served as the basis for several of his noted publications such as Romanesque sculpture of the pilgrimage roads (1923).

Kathryn Brush, Professor at the University of Western Ontario,  has studied Porter’s work in depth and  recently focused on the role played by Lucy Wallace Porter (1876-1962) in her husband’s photographic campaigns.  There is reason to believe that Mrs. Porter took many of the images and even that she may have been the more accomplished photographer.  It is of course difficult to attribute responsibility in the absence of detailed shooting records.  It was rewarding therefore to locate  this image of Mrs. Porter behind the camera as evidence of her efforts.

 

A Medieval Islamic Bestiary

We have a new addition to the Fine Arts Library’s collection of facsimile editions of illuminated manuscripts. The facsimile in this case reproduces the  Kitāb al-Manāfi‘ al-Ḥayawān (The Book on the Usefulness of Animals), a collection of texts classifying and describing the varieties of wild and domestic animals, compiled by the medieval Arab scholar Ibn al-Durayhim al-Mawṣilī (1312-1361) and illustrated during his lifetime with 91 miniatures, probably in Mamluk Syria.

 

 

The work is of great importance for the history of Islamic painting, since it is one of the few illustrated codices of the Mamluk period that can be securely dated and linked to a known author. The autograph manuscript is held by the Royal Library of the Monastery of San Lorenzo del Escorial, near Madrid, Spain. No other copies are known.

 

 

 

This full facsimile edition of Ibn al-Durayhim’s Book on the Usefulness of Animals, accompanied by a scholarly translation of the text by Carmen Ruiz Bravo, was issued in 1990 by a small Spanish publisher that went out of business soon thereafter. As a result, few copies of this facsimile made their way into the collections of academic and research libraries. Only one copy is recorded outside of Spain, and until the Fine Arts Library acquired its copy none were held by institutions in North America.

Embroidery as artist’s tool

Candace Hicks. Common threads

The Fine Arts Library recently acquired a unique artist’s book made from fabric with decorations and text created exclusively through embroidery.  Candace Hicks is a Texas-based artist who elevates a common copy book by recreating it with stitchery.  Common threads (2011) is one of several sewn books Hicks has made in recent years.

For more information about this and other books in our artists’ book collection, please contact us.

 

Exhibition Catalog as Artist’s Book

Byars catalogue

Here are photographs of the unassuming and enigmatic interior of a recently acquired 1977 James Lee Byars catalogue, issued to accompany an exhibition at the Städtisches Museum Mönchengladbach in Germany.  A gold box contains a sheet of crumpled black tissue paper with “TH FI TO IN PH” printed in gold, short for ’THe FIrst TOtally INterrogativ PHilosophy’.  Johannes Cladders’ essay is printed inside the box.

Byars’ object is merely the latest addition to our collection of over a dozen Mönchengladbach catalogs edited or assembled by Cladders in the 1970s and issued in challenging formats such as boxes, scrolls, and portable cases and featuring the work of iconic conceptual artists like Marcel Broodthaers, Giulio Paolini, Daniel Buren, and Jannis Kounellis.

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