Author Interview: Law, Religion, and Health in the United States
Thursday March 08th 2018, 3:02 am
Filed under: author interviews,medicine and religion,public health

Professor Elizabeth Sepper is a scholar of religious liberty and health law at Washington University. In 2017, she participated in a conference organized by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. The conference was dedicated to considering complex legal and ethical issues that emerged in light of cases such as the 2014 Burwell vs. Hobby Lobby Supreme Court Case. Perspectives from attendees of the conference were gathered in the manuscript, Law, Religion, and Health in the United States, published by Cambridge University Press in summer of 2017.

Alexandra Nichipor of the Initiative on Health, Religion, and Spirituality was able to ask Professor Sepper some questions about her recent book.

Alexandra Nichipor: What made you decide to edit a volume around the topic of law, religion, and health?

Elizabeth Sepper: Law, religion, and health were in the air when we brought together the contributors to this volume. The Supreme Court had recently decided the landmark case of Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc., recognizing a for-profit corporation’s right to exercise religion and granting it an accommodation from the Affordable Care Act’s mandate to cover contraceptives in employee insurance plans. Related litigation against the contraceptive mandate was ongoing and had brought to the fore central, unresolved issues in law and religion doctrine that affect health.

At the same time, scientific advances increasingly were challenging religious doctrine. Advances in assisted reproductive technology and life-saving procedures muddy moral and legal questions about the beginning and end of human life. Evolving understanding of human psychology likewise led medical professionals to reject, for example, sexual orientation conversion therapy over objection from some religious believers. (more…)