Release of Iran Blogosphere Case Study

iran blog map

As covered in Sunday’s New York Times by Neil MacFarquhar, the Internet and Democracy project is pleased to release “Mapping Iran’s Online Public: Politics and Culture in the Persian Blogosphere”, the latest in a series of case studies aimed at understanding the Internet’s impact on the public sphere around the world. Utilizing a unique methodology that blends computational analysis and human coding, this case study investigates the contours and scope of the discussions taking place in the Persian blogosphere. John Kelly and Bruce Etling, the authors of this report, write “in contrast to the conventional wisdom that Iranian bloggers are mainly young democrats critical of the regime, we found a wide range of opinions representing religious conservative points of view as well as secular and reform-minded ones, and topics ranging from politics and human rights to poetry, religion and pop culture.”

Be Sociable, Share!

11 Responses to “Release of Iran Blogosphere Case Study”

  1. Sam Jackson Says:

    This is really fascinating, great stuff! I was also really happy to be reminded of the orange revolution publication, because that will prove really useful for a class here at Yale… hooray I&D project! : )

    -Sam, a DN intern

  2. Bruce Says:

    Thanks Sam!

  3. Wolfgang Roth Says:

    A most helpfull aproach and a fabulous stepping stone leading away from stomac centered estimates to more rational assessments.
    I just wonder wether the exploitation of the vast amount of material would contribute to a more precise picture of the society and situation in Iran.

    Wolfgang

  4. idteam Says:

    Thanks Wolfgang. As we note in the paper, we think the blogosphere does mimic Iranian society and part of the conversation taking place online. Certainly more research is needed to understand the conversations that are taking place, who starts them, how ideas are amplified and rise to the top of the blogosphere, the interaction with different media sources and conversations in the offline world. Certainly much more research to be done!

  5. Nazanin Says:

    Dear fellows,
    Thank you all for the beautiful research you have done. I’m Iranian and I’m doing some similar research on the ways Iranians consume blogosphere at Sydney University. I run a blog just for the same purpose and I liked your work. Well done. It’s really amazing that while 18 millions of us access Internet, still we speak the third language of blogging in the world.

    Nazanin

  6. Bruce Says:

    Nazanin,

    Thanks for your kind comments on the paper. Just checked out your blog, which is great. Love that you put each post up in Persian and English. Look forward to reading your research.

    Bruce

  7. Nazanin Says:

    Oh thank you Bruce, You made my day. Fr sure I’ll send you a copy. It has to be finished by next April hopefully. I enjoy every sentence of your research. Thanks for checking my blog, I’m going to write a post about your research.
    Good Luck

  8. Berkman@10 Conference: Day 1 « Blurring Borders Says:

    […] Kelly studies how online communities interact. He spoke about mapping the Iranian blogosphere which is shown below. The different colors represent different areas of […]

  9. Schmidt mit Dete » Mapping the german blogosphere Says:

    […] John mit Hilfe von Netzwerkanalysen verschiedene nationale bzw. sprachliche Blogosphären: Zur iranischen Blogosphäre liegt bereits ein sehr interessantes Paper vor; derzeit stellt er Daten u.a. für die französische […]

  10. Blurring Borders » Blog Archive » Berkman@10 Conference: Day 1 Says:

    […] Kelly studies how online communities interact. He spoke about mapping the Iranian blogosphere which is shown below. The different colors represent different areas of […]

  11. Stuehle Says:

    John mit Hilfe von Netzwerkanalysen verschiedene nationale bzw. sprachliche Blogosphären: Zur iranischen Blogosphäre liegt bereits ein sehr interessantes Paper vor; derzeit stellt er Daten u.a. für die französische