Artificial Intelligence, the Internet of Things, and Social Values

Please join the AALS Internet and Computer Law section for tomorrow’s session on “Artificial Intelligence, the Internet of Things, and Social Values” at the AALS annual meeting in San Francisco. Date / Time: Thursday, 5 January 2017, 1:30 – 3:15PM Location: Hilton San Francisco Union Square Hotel, San Francisco, CA Summary: The Internet of Things […]

Signs, Sex, and Strict Scrutiny

In the latest installment of the Porn Wars, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals has, upon rehearing, remanded a challenge to the age verification provisions of 18 U.S.C. 2257 / 2257A, with instructions that the district court should apply strict scrutiny in its First Amendment analysis. Perhaps strict scrutiny is not fatal in fact, but […]

The iPhone Writ Large

Apple and the Department of Justice are dueling over whether the iPhone maker must write code to help the government break into the San Bernadino shooter’s phone. The government obtained a warrant to search the phone (a nicety, perhaps, since the phone’s owner has consented to the search, and the shooter is dead). But, the […]

Backpage, Dominatrixes, and a Victory Against Jawboning

Sheriff Thomas Dart, of Cook County, is a crusader against prostitution, sex trafficking, and related criminal activity. He has concentrated his efforts recently on Internet platforms such as Craigslist and Backpage, which have an “adult” section as thriving and variegated in its offers as any free weekly newspaper in a major metropolitan area. Dart is […]

Sharing Shortcomings

I have a new essay coming out in Loyola University Chicago Law Journal titled Sharing Shortcomings. Comments and feedback are very much welcomed. Here’s the abstract: Current cybersecurity policy emphasizes increasing the sharing of threat and vulnerability information. Legal reform is seen as crucial to enabling this exchange, both within the public and private sectors […]

The Crane Kick and the Unlocked Door

Cybersecurity legislative and policy proposals have had to grapple with when (if ever) firms ought to be held liable for breaches, hacks, and other network intrusions. Current approaches tend to focus on the data that spills when bad things happen: if it’s sensitive, then firms are in trouble; if not personally identifiable, then it’s fine; […]

Against Jawboning

I’d be grateful for feedback on a new draft article, Against Jawboning, coming out in volume 100 of the Minnesota Law Review. Here’s the abstract: Despite the trend towards strong protection of speech in U.S. Internet regulation, federal and state governments still seek to regulate on-line content. They do so increasingly through informal enforcement measures, […]

ACLU Challenges Arizona Revenge Porn Law

The ACLU, ably assisted by Dentons US LLP, has filed a challenge to Arizona’s revenge porn law in federal district court (complaint, ACLU blog, WIRED story). This is great news for Arizonans: the bill was terribly drafted and unconstitutional from the moment it was signed into law. Fighting revenge porn is important, but as Arizona […]

Why Aren’t “Hacked” Celebrities Filing Takedown Notices?

Writing today in Slate, Emily Bazelon complains that the law does not do enough to protect the privacy rights of celebrities whose accounts were illicitly “hacked” last weekend, resulting in the release of unauthorized nude photos the celebrities apparently took of themselves. Bazelon contrasts what she characterizes as the celebrities’ inability to remove their objectionable content […]

Mod a Game Console, Go to Jail

I’ve been puzzling over the 6th Circuit’s new opinion in United States v. Reichert (No. 13-3479, Mar. 28, 2014), in which a divided panel affirmed a defendant’s criminal conviction for violating the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s anti-trafficking rule (17 U.S.C. § 1201(a)(2)) based on the defendant’s sale of a “modded” video game console to an […]