Still Not a Dump Truck: Net Neutrality and the First Amendment

The D.C. Circuit’s decision in U.S. Telecom Assn. v. FCC came down yesterday. To the delight of net neutrality fans and dismay of many big ISPs, the court held 2-1 that the FCC’s reclassification of broadband under Title II was permissible as a matter of statutory, administrative, and constitutional law. I’m still digesting the first […]

Information Libertarianism

Jane and I have a new article coming out in volume 105 of California Law Review, titled Information Libertarianism. Here’s the abstract: Recent First Amendment precedent is widely attacked as unprincipled: a deregulatory judicial agenda disguised as free speech protection. The scholarly consensus is mistaken. Descriptively, free speech protections scrutinize only information regulation, usefully pushing […]

Does the Ninth Circuit’s “Dancing Baby” Decision Mean Anything for Fair Use Under the DMCA’s Anticircumvention Rules?

Last fall, in Lenz v. Universal Music Corp., the Ninth Circuit ruled that copyright owners are required to have a procedure (even if it is mostly an automated, computer-implemented procedure) in place to consider whether someone else’s use of the copyright owner’s work online is legally protected under the fair use doctrine prior to sending a takedown […]

Backpage, Dominatrixes, and a Victory Against Jawboning

Sheriff Thomas Dart, of Cook County, is a crusader against prostitution, sex trafficking, and related criminal activity. He has concentrated his efforts recently on Internet platforms such as Craigslist and Backpage, which have an “adult” section as thriving and variegated in its offers as any free weekly newspaper in a major metropolitan area. Dart is […]

The Crane Kick and the Unlocked Door

Cybersecurity legislative and policy proposals have had to grapple with when (if ever) firms ought to be held liable for breaches, hacks, and other network intrusions. Current approaches tend to focus on the data that spills when bad things happen: if it’s sensitive, then firms are in trouble; if not personally identifiable, then it’s fine; […]

In Memoriam: Greg Lastowka

I am deeply saddened to learn of the news of the death of my friend Greg Lastowka, a professor at Rutgers-Camden School of Law. Greg was a pioneer in studying virtual worlds and video games, and his work forms a good part of the foundation in that field. His work had that wonderful quality of […]

Against Jawboning

I’d be grateful for feedback on a new draft article, Against Jawboning, coming out in volume 100 of the Minnesota Law Review. Here’s the abstract: Despite the trend towards strong protection of speech in U.S. Internet regulation, federal and state governments still seek to regulate on-line content. They do so increasingly through informal enforcement measures, […]

Why Aren’t “Hacked” Celebrities Filing Takedown Notices?

Writing today in Slate, Emily Bazelon complains that the law does not do enough to protect the privacy rights of celebrities whose accounts were illicitly “hacked” last weekend, resulting in the release of unauthorized nude photos the celebrities apparently took of themselves. Bazelon contrasts what she characterizes as the celebrities’ inability to remove their objectionable content […]

Copyright and the Naughty Bits

My article Exposed is now up on SSRN. It’s coming out in volume 98 of the Minnesota Law Review in 2014. Here’s the abstract: The production of intimate media – amateur, sexually explicit photos and videos – by consenting partners creates social value that warrants increased copyright protection. The unauthorized distribution of these media, such […]

Censorship v3.1

I have a new essay up on SSRN, titled Censorship v3.1. It’s under consideration by the peer-reviewed journal IEEE Internet Computing. Here’s the abstract: Internet censorship has evolved. In Version 1.0, censorship was impossible; in Version 2.0, it was a characteristic of repressive regimes; and in Version 3.0, it spread to democracies who desired to […]