Call for Papers: Artificial Intelligence, the Internet of Things, and Social Values

Artificial Intelligence, the Internet of Things, and Social Values Call for Papers – AALS Section on Internet and Computer Law Topic The Internet of Things will create a vast surge in the amount of data that we – and our devices – generate. To make sense of this trove of information will require the use […]

Still Not a Dump Truck: Net Neutrality and the First Amendment

The D.C. Circuit’s decision in U.S. Telecom Assn. v. FCC came down yesterday. To the delight of net neutrality fans and dismay of many big ISPs, the court held 2-1 that the FCC’s reclassification of broadband under Title II was permissible as a matter of statutory, administrative, and constitutional law. I’m still digesting the first […]

Signs, Sex, and Strict Scrutiny

In the latest installment of the Porn Wars, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals has, upon rehearing, remanded a challenge to the age verification provisions of 18 U.S.C. 2257 / 2257A, with instructions that the district court should apply strict scrutiny in its First Amendment analysis. Perhaps strict scrutiny is not fatal in fact, but […]

Watch “Is Free Speech for Assholes?”

The panel discussion from the Speech Holes conference is now available online, where First Amendment scholars grapple with the age-old question, “Is Free Speech for Assholes?“

Is Free Speech for Assholes?

The College of Law at the University of Arizona is holding a First Amendment conference in February; the public lecture, which features a bevy of free speech luminaries, is titled, “Is Free Speech for Assholes?” The panel will debate the virtues and pitfalls of current First Amendment doctrine, from corporate speech to hate speech to […]

Ground Control to Major Dumb

The St. Louis Cardinals, one of baseball’s most famous teams, is under investigation (by both Major League Baseball and the FBI) for allegedly hacking into a data warehouse compiled by the Houston Astros. At first blush, this seems strange: the Cardinals play in the National League Central, and the Astros in the American League West. […]

Big Pharma: the New Hustler

That’s the provocative thesis of Jane’s post over at Balkinization for the conference Public Health in the Shadow of the First Amendment. Worth a read! And here’s her second post.

Celebrities, Copyright, and Cybersecurity

The fall began with a wave of hacked nude celebrity photos (as Tim notes in his great post). The release generated attention to the larger problem of revenge porn – or, more broadly, the non-consensual sharing of intimate media. Legislators and scholars have moved to tackle the problem. Danielle Citron proposes a model statute for criminalizing revenge […]

ACLU Challenges Arizona Revenge Porn Law

The ACLU, ably assisted by Dentons US LLP, has filed a challenge to Arizona’s revenge porn law in federal district court (complaint, ACLU blog, WIRED story). This is great news for Arizonans: the bill was terribly drafted and unconstitutional from the moment it was signed into law. Fighting revenge porn is important, but as Arizona […]

Why Aren’t “Hacked” Celebrities Filing Takedown Notices?

Writing today in Slate, Emily Bazelon complains that the law does not do enough to protect the privacy rights of celebrities whose accounts were illicitly “hacked” last weekend, resulting in the release of unauthorized nude photos the celebrities apparently took of themselves. Bazelon contrasts what she characterizes as the celebrities’ inability to remove their objectionable content […]