Chayes Fellows circle the globe

(Left to right:  2018 Chayes Fellows Samantha Lint ’19, Lilianna Rembar ’19, and Laya Maheshwari ’19.  Photo:  Lorin Granger.)

 

In 2018, 13 Harvard Law School students were selected as Chayes International Public Service Fellows. This program, established in 2001 and dedicated to the memory of HLS Professor Abram Chayes ’49, provides students with the opportunity to spend eight weeks during the summer working with governmental or non-governmental organizations concerned with issues of an international scope or relevant to countries in transition. Their projects can take many forms; this year, the summer work undertaken by Chayes Fellows focused on issues ranging from refugee assistance in Lebanon to employment and administrative matters, international anti-corruption law, and environmental governance in China, among others.

Read about the experiences of three of the 2018 Chayes Fellows on Harvard Law Today, and view a photo gallery.

Special Event: Establishing and Enforcing Norms

The Chayes International Public Service Fellowships are dedicated to the memory of Professor Abram Chayes, who taught at Harvard Law School for more than 40 years. These fellowships provide Harvard Law School students with the opportunity to spend eight weeks during the summer working with  governmental or non-governmental organizations concerned with issues of an international scope or relevant to countries in transition.

Special event: Courts under Political Pressure

photo:  Lorin Granger

Dieter Grimm LL.M. ’65, a former justice of the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany, returned to Harvard Law School on September 18 to speak on “Courts under Political Pressure.”

Justice Grimm served as a justice on the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany from 1987 to 1999. He is a permanent fellow and former rector at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin Institute for Advanced Study, and a professor emeritus of law at Humboldt University of Berlin. Grimm has been a visiting professor at HLS and at universities around the world. His recent publications include Constitutionalism: Past, Present, and Future (Oxford University Press, 2016) and Sovereignty: The Origin and Future of a Political Concept (Columbia University Press, 2015). An honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he holds a law degree from the University of Frankfurt and an LL.M. from Harvard Law School.

Read more on Harvard Law Today.