Meet the 2018 Chayes Fellows

Thirteen Harvard Law School students have been awarded 2018 Chayes International Public Service Fellowships for work in 13 countries:

Elise Baranouski ’20
Reprieve, United Kingdom

Emma Broches ’20
Commission for International Justice and Accountability, Europe

Cristina Cornejo ’20
World Bank Office of Suspension and Debarment, Washington, DC

Niku Jafarnia ’19
International Refugee Assistance Project, Lebanon

Ji Yoon Kang ’20
Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

Ayoung Kim ’20
Oxfam, Philippines

Samantha Lint ’20
Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

Ava Liu ’20
Natural Resources Defense Council, China

Laya Maheshwari ’20
Médecins Sans Frontières, France and Switzerland

Patrick Maxwell ’20
Geneva Call, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Kate Peiffer ’20
United Nations World Food Programme, Italy

Lilianna Rembar ’20
Legal Resources Centre, Ghana

Natalie Trigo Reyes ’19
José Alvear Restrepo Lawyers’ Collective Corporation, Colombia

The Chayes International Public Service Fellowships are dedicated to the memory of Professor Abram Chayes, who taught at Harvard Law School for more than 40 years. These summer fellowships provide Harvard Law School students with the opportunity to spend eight weeks engaged in public service with an international scope and/or relevant to countries in development or those making transitions to peace, stability, and democracy.

Read more about the 2018 Chayes Fellows here.

Cravath Fellows pursue law projects around the world

Since the Cravath International Fellowships were launched in 2007, more than 170 students have traveled to 69 countries during Winter Term as Cravath Fellows, pursuing clinical placements or independent research with an international, transnational, or comparative law focus. In 2018, ten Cravath Fellows traveled to nine countries; four of the students (left to right: James Toomey ’19, Alexis Wansac ’19, Filippo Raso ’18 and Niku Jafarnia ’19) recently shared their stories with Harvard Law Today.

Photo credit:  Lorin Granger/HLS Staff Photographer

Meet our incoming fall exchange students!

exchange-fall-2017

This fall, nine students from law schools abroad are studying or conducting research at HLS. At the same time, 11 HLS students will spend the fall semester abroad, in Brazil, China, France, Japan, Mexico and Switzerland, either at our exchange partner schools or through an independent semester abroad, and this year two HLS students will enroll in the Harvard Law School and University of Cambridge J.D./LL.M. Joint Degree Program in the United Kingdom.

We hope you’ll have a chance to meet these visiting students.

Pictured above, left to right: FANG Longfei, Renmin University Law School, China; Luna Barroso, Fundação Getulio Vargas, Brazil; Thomas Romailler, University of Geneva Faculty of Law, Switzerland; Harum Mukhayer, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom; BAO Xiaoli, Renmin Law School, China; Joël Schwizgebel, University of Geneva Faculty of Law, Switzerland; Joel Phillips, Sydney Law School, Sydney, Australia; and Alice Dartevelle, Sciences Po Law School, Paris, France. (Not pictured: Tim Bowley, Sydney Law School, Sydney, Australia.)

Where can study abroad take you?
Visit the Semester Abroad pages in the International Legal Studies section of the HLS website, and watch the HLS Calendar of Events and this blog for postings about information sessions scheduled in September and later in the year.

HLS hosts conference on law and development

ghrs-conferenceLegal scholars from across the globe gathered at Harvard Law School in July for a two-day conference on law and development. The conference is the latest in a series of conferences held periodically by a loose consortium of schools–including Harvard Law School, the University of Geneva, Renmin University of China, and the University of Sydney, Australia–on themes of broad shared interest. Previous meetings focused, respectively, on property, corporate governance, and dispute resolution. This year’s conference also included participants from the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Seoul National University, the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia, and the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. This year’s session explored law and development from five vantage points: Business and Trade; Gender and Family; Disability; China as a Case Study; and Three Examples of Potential for Reform.