About Tim Stanley

Hi All, I am Tim Stanley CEO of Justia, a founder of FindLaw (with my wife Stacy Stern and Martin Roscheisen (CEO of NanoSolar http://www.nanosolar.com)). I also run the Stanford Copyright and Fair Use Center. I hope to use this blog to discuss some of the legal and economic issues that lawyers face on the Internet, when I am not putting up screen shots of the Red Sox World Series Win. Peace - Tim

Sacha Baron Cohen and Law School Skits

Ok I saw these a while ago… some law school comedy/parody of parody (who would have thought AliG would be dated material…).


“Ali G” at Cardoza Law School Part 1


“Ali G” at Cardoza Law School Part 2


“Borat” at Osgoode Law School (not as strong as the Cardoza, but then again not as edited)

ok… back to work for a bit… Peace – Tim

Pug Puppies Playing

This is a nice video of Pug Puppies playing :)

Peace – Tim

A Promise of Freedom: An Introduction to U.S. History and Civics for Immigrants (and Americans)

Hi Friends,

Here is a video with some of that learning :)

“A Promise of Freedom” is a 12 minute film based on the National Constitution Center’s “Freedom Rising.” It focuses on the history and founding of our nation and the important rights and responsibilities of U.S. citizenship.

From the Department of Homeland Security U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services by way of
FedFlix, a joint venture between the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) and public.resource.org

Peace – Tim

Videos are Back – Barak Obama’s Acceptance Speech

Great news, I can finally post videos again in this blog :) To celebrate and start things off, here is Barak Obama’s acceptance speech from the Democratic Convention in Denver.

ok… happiness returns :)

Peace – Tim

Radio Radio by Elvis Costello on Saturday Night Live

From This Year’s Model notes on elviscostello.info

The following night we made our U.S. television debut on Saturday Night Live. The Sex Pistols had been scheduled for the show only to cancel after an alleged oversight regarding work permits. Needless to say the expected viewing figures for the debut of U.K. punk outrage were in our favour.

We arrived at NBC with the intention of playing a couple of songs from our live set. Maybe something got lost in translation, but none of the humour seemed nearly as “dangerous” or funny as they seemed to think it was, or perhaps they were just having a bad show. The record company interference certainly didn’t help my mood.

We were getting pressure to perform a number from My Aim is True. I honestly believed that the words of “Less than Zero” would be utterly obscure to American viewers. Taking a cue from an impromptu performance by Jimi Hendrix on a late ’60s B.B.C. television show, I stopped this tune after a few bars and counted off an unreleased song, “Radio, Radio”. I believed that we were just acting in the spirit of the third word of the show’s title, but it was quickly apparent that the producer did not agree. He stood behind the camera making obscene and threatening gestures in my direction. When the number was over, we were chased out of the building and told that we would “never work on American television again”. Indeed, we did not make another U.S. television appearance until 1980. Although this clip from SNL went on to be rerun on numerous occasions, I was not allowed back on the show until 1989. However, I was forgiven in time to be invited to re-create the moment, with the Beastie Boys as my backing band, for the show’s 25th anniversary special.

And a Wikipedia Article on the SNL performance.

Bob Winter on Trademarking Ethiopian Coffee

Bob Winter on Trademarking Ethiopian Coffee… and some Starbucks analysis.

And Here is a post from Donna Byrne’s Food Law Blog.