Posts filed under 'Governance'

Africa’s Internet Infrastructure

Eric Osiakwan and Ethan Zuckerman join Berkman Center visitors and participants to discuss current developments in Africa’s Internet and communications infrastructure, as a follow-up to their Luncheon Series talk last September.

Download the audio podcast (time: 1:35:38).

In this lively conversation with a great deal of questions and answers, we hear about exciting possibilities and innovations, as well as challenges, in connecting African communities to each other and to the global web.

Eric is the Executive Secretary both of the African Internet Service Providers Association (AfrISPA) and the Ghana Internet Service Providers Association (GISPA). And Ethan is a Berkman Center fellow, focusing on the impact of technology on the developing world. Ethan is also a co-founder of the Berkman-sponsored popular international citizen journalism project Global Voices.

3 comments April 12th, 2007

Napster’s Second Life? Regulatory Dynamics of Virtual Worlds

Viktor Mayer-Schoenberger on Napster's Second Life?

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Viktor Mayer-Schoenberger discusses “Napster’s Second Life? Regulatory Dynamics of Virtual Worlds”.

Five million registered users and counting – Second Life is the current darling of the media. With its decision to let users build their virtual world and retain intellectual property rights in their creations they broke new ground, then they opens-sourced their client software. Soon we may see multiple Second Life-like virtual worlds competing against each other – on what? Should lawmakers care? Should we care?

Runtime: 1:15:10, size: 320×240, 175mb, QuickTime .MOV, H.264 codec

Add comment April 4th, 2007

Napster’s Second Life? Regulatory Dynamics of Virtual Worlds

Viktor Mayer-Schoenberger discusses “Napster’s Second Life? Regulatory Dynamics of Virtual Worlds”.

Download the audio podcast (time: 1:15:10).

Five million registered users and counting – Second Life is the current darling of the media. With its decision to let users build their virtual world and retain intellectual property rights in their creations they broke new ground, then they opens-sourced their client software. Soon we may see multiple Second Life-like virtual worlds competing against each other – on what? Should lawmakers care? Should we care?

1 comment April 3rd, 2007

Pop Culture to Democracy

Steve Schultze discusses the convergence of pop culture with political action as it creates a new, networked form of participatory democracy. The discussion is a primer for the Beyond Broadcast 2007 Conference that will take place on February 24th at MIT.

Download the MP3 (time: 1:04:01)

1 comment February 9th, 2007

Securing Human Rights Online

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Ron Deibert, Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto. Prof. Deibert, who is also a principal investigator in the Open Net Initiative, discusses “Securing Human Rights Online: Addressing Long-term Problems of Sustainability, Coordination, and Resource.”

1 comment February 5th, 2007

Securing Human Rights Online

Ron Deibert, Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto. Prof. Deibert, who is also a principal investigator in the Open Net Initiative, discusses “Securing Human Rights Online: Addressing Long-term Problems of Sustainability, Coordination, and Resource.”

Download the MP3 (time: 1:03:01).

2 comments January 30th, 2007

Susan Crawford on The Internet and the Project of Communications Law

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Susan Crawford of Cardozo Law School discusses “The Internet and the Project of Communications Law,” focusing on the way the internet’s uniqueness as a social communications tool should affect the way we think about regulating it.

1 comment January 9th, 2007

Susan Crawford on The Internet and the Project of Communications Law

Susan Crawford of Cardozo Law School discusses “The Internet and the Project of Communications Law,” focusing on the way the internet’s uniqueness as a social communications tool should affect the way we think about regulating it.

Download the MP3 (time: 57:26).

1 comment January 9th, 2007

From Counterculture to Cyberculture: The Rise of Digital Utopianism

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Fred Turner of Stanford University on “From Counterculture to Cyberculture: the Rise of Digital Utopianism.”

In the early 1960s, computers haunted the American imagination. Bleak tools of the cold war, they embodied the rigid organization and mechanical conformity that made the military industrial complex possible. But by the 1990s—and the dawn of the Internet—computers represented a very different kind of world: a collaborative and digital utopia modeled on the communal ideals of the hippies who so vehemently rebelled against the cold war establishment in the first place.Fred Turner explores this extraordinary and ironic transformation by tracing the previously untold story of a highly influential group of San Francisco Bay–area entrepreneurs who made the connections between San Francisco “flower power” and the emerging technological hub of Silicon Valley. Thanks to their vision, counterculturalists and technologists alike joined together to reimagine computers as tools for personal liberation, the building of virtual and decidedly alternative communities, and the exploration of bold new social frontiers.

1 comment December 4th, 2006

From Counterculture to Cyberculture: The Rise of Digital Utopianism

Fred Turner of Stanford University on “From Counterculture to Cyberculture: the Rise of Digital Utopianism.”

Download the MP3 (time: 1:28:32).

In the early 1960s, computers haunted the American imagination. Bleak tools of the cold war, they embodied the rigid organization and mechanical conformity that made the military industrial complex possible. But by the 1990s—and the dawn of the Internet—computers represented a very different kind of world: a collaborative and digital utopia modeled on the communal ideals of the hippies who so vehemently rebelled against the cold war establishment in the first place.

Fred Turner explores this extraordinary and ironic transformation by tracing the previously untold story of a highly influential group of San Francisco Bay–area entrepreneurs who made the connections between San Francisco “flower power” and the emerging technological hub of Silicon Valley. Thanks to their vision, counterculturalists and technologists alike joined together to reimagine computers as tools for personal liberation, the building of virtual and decidedly alternative communities, and the exploration of bold new social frontiers.

4 comments December 1st, 2006

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