Posts filed under 'Governance'

Africa’s Internet and Communications Infrastructure (Part I)


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Eric Osiakwan and Ethan Zuckerman discuss current developments in Africa’s internet and communications infrastructure. Eric Osiakwan is the Executive Secretary both of the African Internet Service Providers Association and the Ghana Internet Service Providers Association. Ethan Zuckerman is a Berkman Center fellow, focusing on the impact of technology on the developing world.

Click here to download the presentation slides (PDF file).

This video was originally shared on blip.tv by VideoBerkman with a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license.

Add comment September 26th, 2006

Doc Searls on The Giant Zero

The Berkman Center welcomes Doc Searls today in his new appointment as Berkman Fellow. Doc Searls is Senior Editor of Linux Journal, where he has covered the Internet, free software and open source movements for more than a decade. He is also (with fellow Berkman Fellow David Weinberger and others) a co-author of “The Cluetrain Manifesto,” and is one of the world’s most widely-read bloggers.

Doc Searls on “The Giant Zero“:

The metaphor is a play on the meaning of both World of Ends (which I co-wrote with fellow Berkman fellow David Weinberger) and The Stupid Network, by Berkman alumnus David Isenberg. (David is also my given name, by the way. Coincidence?) The origin of the metaphor, however, is Craig Burton, who was the first to observe that an end-to-end architecture in which every point is essentially zero distance from every other point (and as stupid as possible in the middle as well), would geometrically resemble a 3-D zero.

Over the next hour, we’ll hear Doc speaking at a Berkman Luncheon Series event on September 19, 2006.

Download the MP3 (time: 1:25:25).

Click here to view Doc’s presentation slides.

Add comment September 20th, 2006

Doc Searls on The Giant Zero

Watch The Video

The Berkman Center welcomes Doc Searls today in his new appointment as Berkman Fellow. Doc Searls is Senior Editor of Linux Journal, where he has covered the Internet, free software and open source movements for more than a decade. He is also (with fellow Berkman Fellow David Weinberger and others) a co-author of “The Cluetrain Manifesto,” and is one of the world’s most widely-read bloggers.

Doc Searls on “The Giant Zero“:

The metaphor is a play on the meaning of both World of Ends (which I co-wrote with fellow Berkman fellow David Weinberger) and The Stupid Network, by Berkman alumnus David Isenberg. (David is also my given name, by the way. Coincidence?) The origin of the metaphor, however, is Craig Burton, who was the first to observe that an end-to-end architecture in which every point is essentially zero distance from every other point (and as stupid as possible in the middle as well), would geometrically resemble a 3-D zero.

Over the next hour, we’ll hear Doc speaking at a Berkman Luncheon Series event on September 19, 2006.

Click here to view Doc’s presentation slides.

Produced by Indigo and Colin Rhinesmith.

This video was originally shared on blip.tv by VideoBerkman with a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license.

Add comment September 20th, 2006

Who Controls The Internet?

Jack Goldsmith, Professor of Law at Harvard, talks about “Who Controls The Internet: Illusions of a Borderless World?”.

A new book co-written with Columbia Law School Professor, Tim Wu. The book asks the following questions, “Is the Internet erasing national borders? Will the future of the Net be set by Internet engineers, rogue programmers, the United Nations, or powerful countries? Who’s really in control of what’s happening on the Net?”

On this edition of AudioBerkman, we’ll hear from Jack Goldsmith speaking at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School.

Download the MP3.

Produced by Colin Rhinesmith.

Attribution: Music for this edition for AudioBerkman was sampled and remixed from a track by mystro titled Mystro Soul Instrumental.

Add comment May 23rd, 2006

Leveraging India as India Stands Up

Ashok Jhunjhunwala, Professor of Electrical Engineering and co-founder of the Telecommunications and Computer Networking Group at the Indian Institute of technology at Madras, explores the factors that have contributed to, and characterized the rise of India over the past decade, and the challenges that lie ahead for the world’s largest democracy.

In this edition of AudioBerkman, Professor Jhunjhunwala offers his unique perspective on this process and in particular the role of new technologies, policies, and business models. Through his working creating information and communication technologies, incubating start-ups, collaborating with national and international companies, advising on national technology policy and preparing the engineers and leaders for tomorrow, Professor Jhunjhunwala has become a true academic entrepreneur, helping shape the present and the future of his University, his nation, and indeed the developing world.

Download the MP3 (time: 24:36)

Produced by Colin Maclay and Colin Rhinesmith.

Attribution: Music from this episode of AudioBerkman was sampled and remixed using a track from Antony Raijekov titled Moment of Green.

Add comment May 19th, 2006

David Isenberg: Network Neutrality Reality

David Isenberg, Berkman Fellow and co-organizer of this year’s F2C: Freedom to Connect conference in Washington, D.C. discusses the issue of Network Neutrality and challenges facing the Internet by the largest telephone companies, the FCC, and Congress.

Download the MP3 (time: 1:13:17)

Download the Powerpoint.

Add comment May 3rd, 2006

The Wealth of Networks

Yochai Benkler, Professor of Law at Yale University, explores the effects of laws that regulate information production and exchange on the distribution of control over information flows, knowledge, and culture in the digital environment.

Professor Benkler discusses these and other topics from his new book, The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom. The Wealth of Networks is a comprehensive social theory of the Internet and the networked information economy. In it, Professor Benkler describes how patterns of information, knowledge, and cultural production are changingand shows that the way information and knowledge are made available can either limit or enlarge the ways people can create and express themselves.

Professor Lawrence Lessig of Stanford Law School has written about Yochai Benklers book, The Wealth of Networks. He says, This is by far the most important and powerful book written in the fields that matter most to me in the last ten years. Read it, Professor Lessig says. Understand it. You are not serious about these issues on either side of these debates unless you have read this book.

Yochai Benklers lecture was presented on April 18, 2006 at Harvard Law School, hosted by The Berkman Center for Internet & Society.

Produced by Colin Rhinesmith.

Download the MP3 (time: 41:22)

Attribution: Music from this episode of AudioBerkman was sampled and remixed using a track from Antony Raijekov titled Be Brave (Dub-TripHop RMX).

3 comments April 23rd, 2006

The Legacy of WSIS

AudioBerkman brings you inside the World Summit on the Information Society the enormous UN-sponsored convention held in December 2003. WSIS brought together a staggering number of international diplomats, scholars, activists, and government officials for discussions about the future of information and communications technologies (ICTs). How do you make sense of a milestone this big? The scholarly journal, Information Technologies and International Development, asked exactly this question in January by issuing a call for papers for an issue devoted to making sense of WSIS. AudioBerkman follows Colin Maclay, a Berkman Center fellow and contributor to the journal, as he and ITID editors sift submissions and try to evaluate the legacy of WSIS. (running time: 9 min)

Stream the MP3 (9.1 MB).

Download the MP3.

Add comment March 24th, 2004

Looking Back on an Internet Decade

Ten years ago, in the March 1994 issue of Wired, Berkman fellow John Perry Barlow fired a revolutionary shot heard ’round the world. In his essay The Economy of Ideas he announced to the world that everything we know about intellectual property is wrong. Audio Berkman producer Benjamen Walker took a trip to New York City to mark this ten year anniversary. Listen in: Looking Back on an Internet Decade with John Perry Barlow (16 minutes).

Stream the MP3 (the file may take time to buffer — 15.7 MB).

Download the MP3.

Read On

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Add comment February 27th, 2004

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