Posts filed under 'Politics'

Alexander Heffner on Scoop 08

QuickTime Video

Download the MP3 (time: 01:14:23)

Alexander Heffner senior at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, was the guest speaker this week at the Berkman Center’s Luncheon Series.

He is co-founder and editor-in-chief of Scoop08.com, an online national student newspaper dedicated to coverage of the 2008 presidential election. Heffner discusses how scoop08 is geared towards young adults and represents political ideas across the spectrum. Presently, Scoop08 has a network of several hundred student journalists across the country and abroad, and actively continues to recruit new editors and writers. Runtime: 01:14:23, size: 320×240, 165.4MB, .MOV, H.264 codec

Add comment March 11th, 2008

Fernando Rodrigues “Journalism and Public Information in Brazil” – Video

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Fernando Rodrigues, Brazillian journalist and Harvard Nieman Fellow was the guest speaker this week at the Berkman Center’s Luncheon Series.

Rodrigues spoke about journalism and access to public information in Brazil.

Journalist Fernando Rodrigues assembled a database with some 25,000 records of Brazilian politicians showing electoral information and personal data –including the list of personal assets of each politician who run for office in the three past general elections in Brazil (1998, 2002 and 2006). In 2006, the day the website was last updated, it drew 1,000,000 viewers. It is a free access website and voters can check whether a particular politician has increased his or her patrimony in a compatible way with the declared income. The database has also been an endless source of news stories for media outlets all over Brazil.

Collecting all that information was not an easy task, since Brazil does not have a Freedom of Information Act. Mr. Rodrigues also works with the National Forum of Right of Access to Public Information, a new advocacy group in favor of a FoIA for Brazil. The Forum teaches people how to require public information from government agencies despite that there is no clear legislation about it.

Runtime: 01:12:43, size: 320×240, 214.3MB, .MOV, H.264 codec

1 comment January 22nd, 2008

THE MUKASEY HEARINGS REVISITED: LEGAL EXPERTS ANALYZE THE NEW ATTORNEY GENERAL’S VIEWS ON NATIONAL SECURITY AND SEPARATION OF POWERS

QuickTime Video

The confirmation hearings for Attorney General Michael Mukasey raised numerous legal and constitutional issues relating to the interplay of national security, civil liberties, and the separation of powers. The positions of the members of the Senate Judiciary Committee and of the then-nominated, now-confirmed, Attorney General present a rich variety of views of the Constitution, the balance of powers among the three Branches of government, and the pressures on both in a time of international conflict. A panel of experts in both Cambridge and Washington will analyze these positions and consider whether and what the views of the new Attorney General will add to the legal mix.

Download the MP3 (time: 1:25:12)

Add comment November 29th, 2007

Citizen Media Law Podcast #1: Federal Shield Bill; Co-Blogging and Legal Threats; Phoenix New Times Arrests

Welcome to the first episode of the Citizen Media Law Podcast, providing practical knowledge and tools for citizen journalists. This week, David Ardia responds to the federal shield bill passed in the U.S. House of Representatives, Colin Rhinesmith talks about legal threats to co-bloggers, and Sam Bayard reflects on the Phoenix New Times arrests.

Download the MP3 (time: 7:00)

Music used in this podcast was sampled and remixed from a track titled “Jazz House” by the Wicked Allstars, available on Magnatune.

To subscribe to the Citizen Media Law Podcast, visit our Subscriptions page or go directly to the podcast feed.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Add comment October 26th, 2007

Drew Clark on the Politics of Telecom, Media and Technology

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Drew Clark of the Center for Public Integrity joined an enthusiastic crowd at today’s Berkman Luncheon Series to discuss “Media Tracker, FCC Watch, and the Politics of Telecom, Media and Technology.”

Drew, a senior fellow and project manager at the Center, not only provided great insight into the difficult and confusing intersection of technology & politics, but also dove into specific examples such as, the FCC’s 700 MHz auction and the Connect Kentucky project.

For more information on Drew’s work, the Center for Public Integrity, and future luncheon guests, check out the Events & Webcast blog.

Runtime: 1:03:25, size: 320×240, 175MB, .MOV, H.264 codec

4 comments October 10th, 2007

The Future of the Net

JZ, live on the big screen, Future of the Internet Luncheon

In the spirit of One Web Day, a celebration of global online life taking place on September 22nd, as well as Berkman’s 10th anniversary, we dedicated our luncheon series last week to a discussion on “The Future of the Net.”

Download the MP3 (time: 1:05:20)

In a packed house, four Berkman Faculty/Fellows talked about their visions of the Net 10 years from now. Presenters included: MIT Media Lab professor Judith Donath, CALI fellow Gene Koo, visiting assistant professor at Northeastern School of Law Wendy Seltzer, and Berkman co-founder Jonathan Zittrain.

Add comment September 24th, 2007

The Future of the Net

QuickTime Video

In the spirit of One Web Day, a celebration of global online life taking place on September 22nd, as well as Berkman’s 10th anniversary, we dedicated today’s luncheon series to a discussion on “The Future of the Net.”

In a packed house, four Berkman Faculty/Fellows talked about their visions of the Net 10 years from now. Presenters included: MIT Media Lab professor Judith Donath, CALI fellow Gene Koo, visiting assistant professor at Northeastern School of Law Wendy Seltzer, and Berkman co-founder Jonathan Zittrain.

Produced by Leah Weinberger.

Runtime: 59:42 , size: 320×240, 86MB, .MOV, H.264 codec

3 comments September 21st, 2007

Digital Natives: Participatory Culture or Self-Representation?

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Corinna di Gennaro visited the Berkman Center this week to discuss “Digital Natives: Participatory Culture or Self-Representation?”

The growing diffusion of Internet adoption and use and the popularity of Internet applications from blogs to social networking sites, has sparkled a revolution in the way people gather and share information. But is the euphoria surrounding Web 2.0 backed up by actual changes in social practices? And are digital natives leading the revolution?

Corinna led the discussion that looked for answers to these questions and more, with a particular focus on how the Internet is reshaping notions of citizenship and people’s participation in the democratic process.

Corinna is a sociologist, working on the social implications of Internet adoption and use for civic engagement and political participation. She is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Annenberg Center at USC.

Runtime: 1:02:45, size: 320×240, 147MB, QuickTime .MOV, H.264 codec

Add comment May 18th, 2007

Digital Natives: Participatory Culture or Self-Representation?

Corinna di Gennaro visited the Berkman Center this week to discuss “Digital Natives: Participatory Culture or Self-Representation?”

Download the audio podcast (time: 1:02:39).

The growing diffusion of Internet adoption and use and the popularity of Internet applications from blogs to social networking sites, has sparkled a revolution in the way people gather and share information. But is the euphoria surrounding Web 2.0 backed up by actual changes in social practices? And are digital natives leading the revolution?

Corinna led the discussion that looked for answers to these questions and more, with a particular focus on how the Internet is reshaping notions of citizenship and people’s participation in the democratic process.

Corinna is a sociologist, working on the social implications of Internet adoption and use for civic engagement and political participation. She is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Annenberg Center at USC.

2 comments May 16th, 2007

Teresa Hackett on Digital Libraries in Developing Nations

Click To Play Video

University: Knowledge Beyond Authority
Internet & Society Conference 2007
Lead Up Event

The role and mission of libraries is to collect, organise, preserve and make available the world’s cultural and scientific heritage for current and future generations. Publicly funded libraries operating for the public benefit support access to knowledge, as well as education and training, critical to developing nations whose human resource is central to their advancement. Digital technologies are transforming the way that libraries work. What new opportunities are being created? What challenges do we face and how is eIFL.net addressing them?

Teresa Hackett runs eIFL-IP “Advocacy for Access to Knowledge: copyright & libraries”, a programme to raise awareness in copyright issues for libraries in 50 developing and transition countries. The goal is to build capacity and expertise amongst the eIFL.net library community and to represent the interests of members in key international policy fora such as WIPO, UNESCO and the WTO. Previously, Teresa was the Director of the European library association (EBLIDA), provided technical support to the European Commission library research programme and was part of the team to establish electronic information centres at the British Council Germany. Teresa is currently an Expert Resource Person on the Copyright and Other Legal Matters Committee of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA-CLM). She is a chartered librarian and in 2004 completed a post-graduate diploma in legal studies at the Dublin Institute of Technology.

Runtime: 1:14:10, size: 320×240, 208MB, QuickTime .MOV, H.264 codec

Add comment May 2nd, 2007

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