Archive for the 'video' Category

Nathan Matias on Developing Effective Citizen Responses to Discrimination and Harassment Online

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Discrimination and harassment have been persistent problems since the earliest days of the social web. As platforms and legislators continue to debate and engineer responses, most of the burden of dealing with online discrimination and harassment has been borne by the online citizens who experience and respond to these problems.

How can everyday Internet citizens make sense of social problems online, including our own racist and sexist behavior? How can we support each other and cooperate towards change in meaningful, effective ways? And how can we know that our interventions are making a difference?

Nathan Matias — MIT PhD candidate and Berkman Fellow — shares four years of research and design interventions aimed at expanding the power of citizens to understand and develop effective responses to discrimination and harassment online.

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Bruce Schneier on Security and Privacy in the World-Sized Web

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We’ve created a world where information technology permeates our economies, social interactions, and intimate selves. The combination of mobile, cloud computing, the Internet Things, persistent computing, and autonomy are resulting in something different. This World-Sized Web promises great benefits, but is also vulnerable to a host of new threats. Threats from users, criminals, corporations, and governments. Threats that can now result in physical damage and even death.

In this talk Bruce Schneier — author and internationally renowned security technologist — looks back at what we’ve learned from past attempts to secure these systems, and forward at what technologies, laws, regulations, economic incentives, and social norms we need to secure them in the future.

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California Supreme Court Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar on Haiti, Machine Learning, and Ankle Holsters: Reflections on the U.S. Treasury Department in the Late 1990s

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In 1997, as a freshly-minted lawyer, Mariano-Florentino (Tino) Cuéllar joined the staff of the Treasury Department’s Office of Enforcement. Almost immediately, he was drawn into some of the fascinating issues that Treasury confronted at the time, from the regulation of electronic money to international policing and anti-corruption initiatives. In this talk, he reflects on his years at Treasury and discusses some of the connections between the challenges he encountered at Treasury then, and some of the dilemmas facing the world today.

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Nettrice Gaskins on Techno-Vernacular Creativity and STEAM

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In this talk Dr. Nettrice Gaskins — author and STEAM Lab Director at Boston Arts Academy — discusses her model for ‘techno-vernacular’ creative production as an area of practice that investigates the characteristics of this production and its application in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Mathematics) learning.

Her research consists of a study involving workshops conducted between 2013 and 2014 that sought to examine the impact of the following combined methods a) culturally situated design, which connects vernacular art and crafts with standards-based STEM principles and allows users to simulate and develop their own creations; b) art-based learning, which is effective in stimulating the development of 21st century skills such as creativity, learning, and innovation; and c) educational applications of new technologies on underrepresented ethnic groups’ learning in STEAM.

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The State of Student Privacy

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What questions are dominating the student privacy and educational technologies (“ed tech”) landscape?

In this conversation the Berkman Center’s Student Privacy Initiative team does a deep dive into the 1.0 and 2.0 privacy conversations:
The 1.0 strand of inquiry has examined privacy concerns related to the interactions between governmental entities (K-12 public schools) and third-party services (from commercial ed tech vendors), with a focus on data collection, consent, and security. The 2.0 line of inquiry has encompassed intra-governmental matters (how schools themselves are or should be using student data to inform their work with students), intra-industry analysis (the role of new and emerging types of ed tech, such as IoT and robotics), as well as how these and related questions within each sphere (government and vendor) impact their shared interactions and the experiences of key stakeholders (students, teachers, parents, policymakers, etc.).

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Robin Chase on Privacy in a World of IoT, Self-Driving Cars, and a Climate Crisis

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Robin Chase — cofounder of Zipcar and Veniam (building a dynamic communications network for the Internet of moving things) — lays out a near term future where communications and software platforms will deliver us smart cities, smart homes, and ubiquitous clean low-cost shared transport. On the one hand we have an environmental imperative to get co2 emissions under control, use assets efficiently, deliver thriving sustainable cities. On the other hand, at what cost to privacy?

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Mary L. Gray on Re-assembling the Assembly Line: Digital Labor Economies and Demands for an Ambient Workforce

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Crowdwork — “the process of taking tasks that would normally be delegated to an employee and distributing them to a large pool of online workers, the ‘crowd,’ in the form of an open call” — has become an entire category of global employment we could never have imagined existing a few short years ago.

In this talk, Mary L. Gray — Senior Researcher at Microsoft Social Research — presents results of a two-year ethnographic and qualitative study of the cultural meaning, political implications, and ethical demands of crowdwork in India and the United States.

The study examines the emergence of an Ambient Workforce — a distributed, always-on, at-the-ready, expansive labor market, dependent on a mix of intense bursts of activity AND a “long tail” of idling — and how society might help shape this explosively growing sector.

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Sarah Jeong on The Internet of Garbage

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Women are disparately impacted by harassment on the Internet. Harassment can be framed as a civil rights problem, with legal solutions proposed and vitriol directed towards platforms for failing to protect female users. But, as Sarah Jeong — a lawyer and journalist who covered the Silk Road trial for Forbes — suggests, the Internet has figured out interesting ways to deal with other kinds of online speech — like spam and malware. And using this lens could inform the fight against online harassment.

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Cory Doctorow: Kill All DRM in the World Forever, Within a Decade

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In this conversation with Jonathan Zittrain, Cory Doctorow — author and EFF Special Advisor — explains how he plans to kill all DRM in the world forever, within a decade.

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Patrick Murck on Property Law and the Blockchain

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Confusion abounds about Bitcoin, and the market technology that helps keep the alternative currency market transparent and stable: Blockchain. Compounding this confusion is the reliance on insufficient analogies used to describe aspects of these systems like “wallets”, “coins,” and “miners.” These abstractions gloss over important nuances in how the bitcoin system actually works, and creates a hazard for regulators, policymakers and academics who use these analogies to shape law and policy decisions.

In this talk Patrick Murck — Berkman Fellow and Co-founder of the Bitcoin Foundation — unpacks Blockchain and some of the complicated property law issues that it poses.

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