Letter from Munich – 065

Letter from Munich – the Joseph Affair – 65

EINE DEUTSCHE FASSUNG STEHT WEITER UNTEN.

5 April 2002

Dear Mr. Graf, dear friends,

“Here,” Francesca had said, “we have the most questionable element in this statement. Can anyone really believe that this boy would be so afraid of the judge that he would NOT tell the truth? Isn’t it more reasonable to suppose that if a boy were afraid of a judge, he would for that very reason go on and tell the truth? I think it would also be reasonable to think about the fact that there are a large number of neo-Nazis in Saxony and in Sebnitz, that there are right-wing extremists even among the police, that the brother of this boy, Rene May, was beaten by neo-Nazis because of the statements that Rene made before the judge in Dresden and on television, that the boy was lying to the police because of this intimidation, and that what he told the judge earlier was in fact the truth.”

Francesca continue reading Rene May’s statement:

Question: Your sworn statement of 29 March 2000 is now in front of you. Who wrote that?

Answer: Frau Kantelberg wrote it in her office. Diana was also there. It was already written. I was supposed to just sign, because both of them wanted to go somewhere. Where, I don’t know. I didn’t read it, because I can’t read properly. And it wasn’t read out to me. I was there for about an hour and signed it.

“The Kantelberg-Abdullahs,” Francesca remarked, “say that is simply not the truth.”

Question: The sworn statement of 6 July 2000 is now in front of you. How did this statement come about?

Answer: I was there at the Abdullahs and made the statement. Herr Abdullah said to me that Joseph was abused with a stun gun and I should say that. Whether it was true, I don’t know. I was there for about three hours. On this day Herr and Frau Abdullah and Diana were there. With both of them, it was that Herr Abdullah spoke to me on the street. He asked me to come with him.

“Once again,” said Francesca, “I have to repeat, that the Kantelberg-Abdullahs themselves gave me the transcript of this statement, and they insist that what the boy says at this point is simply not true.”

Question: Did you get something in return?

Answer: I got 10 DM on each of the two days.

Question: Why are you making this statement today?

Answer: I think I would have gotten into trouble otherwise. My father said I should tell everything the right way, the way it was. He called that to me when you came to pick me up.

“The key words here,” said Francesca, “are, ‘I think I would have gotten into trouble otherwise.’ What kind of ‘trouble’ was he talking about? Into trouble with his father, with the police, with the court, with neo-Nazis?”

Question: Would you like to say anything else?

Answer: No I don’t know anything more. If I remember the names of the skinheads or the friend who was taken upstairs, then I’ll tell you. One of the skinheads was called “Mertens” or something, with a last name.

During the questioning I was given something to drink and some cookies.

Ended at 5:45 pm.

“And then below are the signatures of the officers and Rene May,” said Francesca. “An unusual document, isn’t it? I can only think of what I said about the boy’s completely opposite statement to the judge, when I asked if anyone could really believe that this boy would be so afraid of the judge that he would NOT tell the truth? Isn’t it more reasonable to think that if a boy were afraid of a judge, he would for that very reason go on and tell the truth and that what he told the judge was the truth, but not what he told the police?”

Sincerely yours,

Robert John Bennett

Mauerkircherstrasse 68

81925 Germany

Telephone: +49.89.981.0208

E-Mail:  rjbennett at post.harvard.edu

E-M… Saad and Renate Kantelberg-Abdulla:  rjbennett at post.harvard.edu

E-M… an Herrn und Frau Dr. Kantelberg-Abdulla:  majoskantelberg at t-online.de

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