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With this blog we hope to draw attention to the intriguing and remarkably rare items discovered by Harvard Library users during the course of their research. Harvard Library Preservation routinely reviews books returned through circulation, knowing that these returns include a surprising numbers of works that are too deteriorated to survive continued use, and are that too rare and interesting not to share online with the Harvard community, and beyond.

Titles are selected for digitization through various criteria such as rarity, condition, use, research relevance, and/or visual content. We invite you to peruse the titles posted here as well as subscribe to our feeds and see what titles queued for digitization, as well as those already completed and online.

Discover, Connect, and Comment!

 

Tokyo 1911

Ogawa Kazuma (1860-1929), remarkable Japanese photographer, printer and publisher, was an innovator in photomechanical printing and photography during the Meiji and Taisho periods. He started studying English and photography at the age of 15, moving to Tokyo in 1880 where he was hired as an interpreter in the Yokohama Police Department, meanwhile learning photography. Wanting to improve his English and photographic skills, he traveled to America, visiting Washington, Boston, and Philadelphia where he took courses in portrait photography and the dry plate process. Upon his return to Japan in 1884, Ogawa opened the first photographic studio in Tokyo, eventually establishing himself as one of the premier Japanese photographers. He published more than 400 books during his career providing beautifully crafted artistic photographs along with images of a rapidly changing Japan during the Meiji and Taisho period.

Ogawa provides the following insight into his photographic publication on Tokyo in 1911.

The present album, notwithstanding the comparative small number of photographs it contains, gives pictures of most places in Tokyo that are noted for their charming scenery or historic interest and enables the beholder to obtain a fair idea of the actual views of those places, an idea which will, it is believed, fully confirm the truth of the proverb that one sight is better than a hundred hearsays.

The book provides 107 halftones with descriptive information in Japanese and English. The images offer an excellent view of Tokyo at a time when tradition and modernization collided regularly resulting in fundamental changes to social structure, politics, and economics.

 

view of Tokyo from an airship

view of an expanding Tokyo from an airship

 

cherry blossoms

cherry blossoms

 

post office and telephone exchange

 

fire brigade display

fire brigade display

 

kindergarten

kindergarten

 

wrestling event

wrestling event

 

Description:
Ogawa, Kazumasa 1860-1930 author. Scenes in the eastern capital of Japan. Tokyo :: Publisher, K. Ogawa, F.R.P.S.,, 1911.
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:32638697
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

This early Civil War Era broadside from 1861 entitled: “Comparison of Products, Population and Resources of the Free and Slave States” was compiled by John M Batchelder, most likely from 1850s data. At the top of the chart is an illustration of former New York Policeman, Peter Hart, whose heroic attempt to keep the flag flying over Fort Sumter during the bombardment of April 12-13, 1861 became iconic. The Hart image signals that the broadside was likely printed soon after the fall of Fort Sumter. Further evidence on this being an early Civil War document is the use of the term “seven Seceding States”, indicating it was printed before news spread of Virginia’s secession, the eighth state to leave the Union on April 17th. The graph appears to be a striking visual argument as to why the North was superior to the South, having a decisive advantage in population, schools, education, libraries, wealth, and infrastructure. The South was accredited with an edge in cotton production, annual mean temperature, and illiteracy. By using the terms, “Free” and “Slave” States, the compiler made his sympathies known and his allegiance with the abolitionist movement and a free labor economy. Where this was posted and who was the targeted audience is not entirely clear.

John M. Batchelder (1811-1892) was a Boston civil engineer with a particular interest in telegraphy and submarine cables. He corresponded with Samuel F.B. Morse for the advancement of the telegraph system. Batchelder and his family were involved in a number of social causes, including petitions against slavery and fugitive laws, as well as prevention of cruelty to animals.

 

Description:
Batchelder, John Montgomery 1811-1892 author. Comparison of products, population and resources of the free and slave states. Cambridge: Printed by Welch, Bigelow, c1861.
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:29921910
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

Beginning operations in 1906, The Aladdin Company of Bay City, Michigan became one of America’s most long lived manufacturers of mail-order pre-fab homes. By 1918 Aladdin accounted for almost 3% of all new housing in the United States. With its steady growth and soldified reputation in the homeowner market, Aladdin ventured into mass produced industrial housing, mostly targeting large manufacturing companies, such as coal mining and textile mills, needing fast and cheap housing for their “company towns”. Aladdin Cities included plans for infrastructure, such as water treatment plants, lighting systems, and even landscaping for streets. Designs also allowed for stores, churches, schools, and public offices.

Aladdin was bold with their advertisement campaign, particularly in minimizing the value of the architect as the exclusive “expert designer”. Aladdin boasted that their hands-on experience was superior to these high priced architects and their company could construct a town in under a month with building costs of 30% less than traditional methods.

There should be nothing mysterious, theoretical or psychological about the planning and completion of a modern, sanitary and attractive community of workmen’s homes.

The Aladdin Company produced prototype towns for the Du Pont industry and used this initial success to offer plans from 300 to 3,000 dwellings along with some 50 unique homestyles designs. In addition to homes, Aladdin offered larger housing structures to serve military needs, such as barracks. Although Aladdin continued to sell groups of homes to various customers for 75 years, its effort to establish an industrial catalog was unsuccessful.

This 1918 catalog provides a unique insight into housing in America, including changing methods in home construction, planning, and costs.

 

Description:
Aladdin Company. Aladdin plan of industrial housing as developed from the experience of thirteen years in the expenditure of millions of dollars as architect, manufacturer, engineer and contractor of moderate priced homes, communities and industrial cities. Bay City, Mich. : The Aladdin Co., 1918-.
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:32109488
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

Theodore Dreiser is well known for his contributions to American literature, including the 1900 classic Sister Carrie. However, before Dreiser became this literary icon, he was an editor and journalist, writing columns and criticism in a woman’s magazine entitled “Ev’ry Month”. The publication, which lasted from 1895 to 1903 and described as “An Illustrated Magazine of Popular Music, The Drama, and Literature,” was targeted at the growing middle-class woman, much in the same vein as Ladies Home Journal or Harper’s Bazaar. His brother, Paul Dresser, was a successful balladeer and contributor to the magazine. Since the publication spanned the Spanish-American War, it introduced patriotic songs and articles.

Dreiser is a pivotal writer for the start of the 20th century, creating characters who did not adhere to Victorian mores and values, but were recognized for their persistence against life’s obstacles and society’s constraints. It is unclear as to how much his writing during this time displays evidence of his thinking, philosophy, or eventual literary prowess. However, as an editor and column contributor, often under pseudonyms, he was clearly exploring the female voice in America. It does not take a leap of faith to make some connections to his first novel, Sister Carrie, a woman on her journey from a small town to the sordid society of the big city, achieving stardom and fortune as an actress.

A regular feature were the songs of Gussie L. Davis. Davis was one of America’s earliest successful African-American music artists, the first Black songwriter to become famous on Tin Pan Alley as a composer of popular music. His  “Irene, Good Night” was revitalized by Leadbelly in the 1930s.

“While the people who have enjoyed the songs of Gussie L. Davis are numbered by the thousands, there are very few who know that instead of being a girl, this talented writer is a bright-eyed, intellectual young colored man. He is remarkable, over some of the more widely known people of his race, in the fact that he writes not only the music of his songs, but the words as well. Mr. Davis was born in Cincinnatti in 1863, and for some years attended the public schools in that city. When about seventeen, he determined to join a minstrel troupe, but found it hard to get a footing, as he was unknown. Having a taste for music, he composed a song called “ When we sat beneath the Maples on the Hill, ” and had it published at his own expense. This song was a success, and gave the young composer a reputation, which enabled him to get a good position in the minstrel business. While in this line he discovered how desirable a knowledge of music was, and determined to get a musical education. With laudable enterprise he secured a position in a music college as janitor, where he received lessons and a tiny salary for his services. Here he spent nearly three years in hard work, leaving it to play the piano for a living.”

Description:
Dreiser, Theodore 1871-1945. Ev’ry month. New York: Howley, Haviland & Co, 1895-.
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:27408642
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

The Gods of Pegana

Edward Plunkett, the 18th Baron of Dunsany, was known for his fantasy tales published under the name ‘Lord Dunsany.’ His imaginary worlds were filled with gods, witches, and magic. He invented a fictional land with its own culture, history, and mythology, which had a huge influence on the epic works of J.R.R. Tolkien. His first fantasy work, The Gods of Pegana, was published in 1905. The accompanying illustrations by Sidney Herbert Sime are equally celebrated and considered integral to the work. The Gods of Pegana was the start of a 15-year collaboration with Sime and sometimes led to Dunsany crafting stories around Sime’s inspirational illustrations rather than just complimenting his prose. Other than two frontispieces for a pair of Arthur Machen books, Dunsany’s were the only books Sime illustrated. Most of Sime’s work was produced for magazines and newspapers. While Dunsany was born into wealth, Sime was born into poverty in Manchester, working as a coal miner until he could finally afford to attend art school. However, the class differences did not impede their relationship. Upon its release, The Gods of Pegana was well received with positive reviews by the media.

“There has been no such big and delicate fancy as this book for many years.”—Daily Chronicle.

“The splendour and imagery of Mr. Sime’s pictures.”—Pall Mall Gazette.

“There are certain things which give this book of myths a mysterious appeal. It is written in language which has sometimes delicate music in it fitted to subtle fancies. And the mere fact of its appearance in the modern world is interesting. It re-peoples the physical world.”—Manchester Guardian

Lord Dunsany followed his success with Time and the Gods (1906), The Book of Wonder (1912), and The King of Elfland’s Daughter (1924). Not limited to the fantasy genre, Dunsany also wrote plays, essays, poems, and reviews until his death in 1957. He became largely forgotten in the ensuing decades, with most of his work falling out of print. To some degree, his work is experiencing a renaissance as his contributions to the genres of fantasy and science fiction are finally being realized and celebrated.

The chief of the gods of Pegāna is Mana-Yood-Sushai, who created the other gods and then fell asleep

Slid, the god of waters

Mung, the god of death

Description:
Dunsany, Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett. The gods of Pegāna. [London] : Pegana Press, 1911.
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:5362428
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

Etiquette at Washington

The Industrial Revolution in America created a consumer economy, shifting traditional wealth and power away from the long standing blue-blood families and towards the capitalist magnate and a developing new middle class. The idea of the “self-made” American was clearly at odds with the traditional aristocratic and elitist mores of the past centuries. Yet at the same time, this “new” class hungered for similar customs of exclusivity to differentiate themselves from the working class and the less fortunate. The new middle class, built on wealth and economic clout, wanted to purchase an American code of mores and manners, similar to buying opulent homes, fashionable clothing, or new technology. During this period, a proliferation in etiquette books were printed, providing social rules for a new American “polite society”. The “Etiquette at Washington” publication was promoted as an “insider’s guide” by a local citizen, aimed at educating those visiting or moving to Washington D.C.  It has some interesting sections on social conventions for the presidency and other federal institutions and officials.

“This is a modest little volume, purporting to be the Oracle of fashion and good-breeding, in which one may learn like Sheridan’s heroine, to “start by rule and blush by example”— to take wine with grace—eat with ease—enter a room with dignity—sustain one’s self with all possible sangfroid under the most trying circumstances—and finally to be buried according to the strictest notions of propriety. This book must be esteemed available acquisition by those who hold a solecism in taste as worse than a crime, and more readily pardon the neglect of a bill, than a failure to answer an invitation to dinner. Nothing escapes the attention of the writer.”    

a review from the Southern Literary Messenger, v.15

Some excerpts:

The President:

Every citizen of the United States who visits Washington, considers that he has a claim to visit the Chief Magistrate of the Union, and he is accordingly presented to him, and after shaking hands and conversing for a few moments, retires, delighted with the suavity of the President, and elevated in his own estimation. Strangers who are awaiting an audience in the ante-room, are frequently much annoyed at witnessing individuals who come long after, admitted before them….An invitation to dine with the President cannot be declined, except under the most pressing circumstances, without the greatest breach of respect to the Chief Magistrate of the Union. An invitation from him, is a sufficient apology for declining an invitation previously given and accepted.

General Society:

There is no place in the United States where less attention is paid to mere money than at the seat of government; and the millionaire, whose magnificent equipage attracts such attention in the commercial cities, is surprised at the little influence he exercises here. The truth is that the great personages who form the centre of attraction are generally not rich men, and make but little attempt in their style of living. It is no unusual thing to find a Senator, whose lofty talents and gifted eloquence are the theme of every tongue, plainly lodged with his family at furnished apartments, provided for him by a French cook, or forming a part of a mess composed of six or eight of his fellow Senators.

Customs:

It sometimes becomes necessary to perform the unpleasant duty, of ridding oneself of a disagreeable or improper acquaintance, and in no situation is true politeness more necessary than in this. The object is not to produce an open rupture, but simply to inform the proscribed person of a desire for a discontinuance of the acquaintance, which can usually be accomplished by an adherence, more rigid than ordinary, to the strict observances of ceremony. If he is too dull to observe this, more decided measures are warrantable.

 

Description:
Etiquette at Washington together with the customs adopted by polite society in the other cities of the United States. To which is added an appendix, containing an accurate description of the public buildings in Washington. Baltimore :: John Murphy & Co., printers and publishers, 1850.
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:30211081
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

The card catalog was a library stalwart for almost 200 years. The earliest use of a card system for inventory control is credited to France where rare confiscated books were distributed to various repositories around Paris for safe keeping. Upon distribution, a card was created with basic bibliographic information to be held at the “Paris Bureau de Bibliographie”. The early application of cards sometimes involved the use of discarded playing cards and other non-standard formats and sizes. Other libraries resisted the use of cards and relied upon a traditional ledger book for tracking and recording acquistions. However, the growth of library collections made the book format impractical and unwieldy for recording entries and maintaining updates, leaving libraries to either manage a haphazard list of annotated holdings or resort to transcribing a new updated ledger. Ezra Abbot (1819–1884), assistant librarian of Harvard College, planned and implemented an alphabetic card catalog with a catalog based on to topics or subjects, creating a more efficient and effective method for inventory control and searching publications.

The modern ubiquitous catalog card made its appearance in Britain and the United States around 1876, with Melvil Dewey, and his Library Bureau business, establishing card-size standards, recommended cabinetry, and instructions on the appropriate application of a card catalog system. Dewey, along with Thomas Edison, developed a preferred “library hand” to be used in libraries and taught in library schools. The chief advantage of the card catalog over the book catalog was how easy it was to add new acquisitions to the file without making any older part of the catalog obsolete. That, in turn, made it easy to include added entries and offering users searching by title, author, or subject. The library catalog in turn influenced the business sector providing an easy to maintain system for tracking parts, products, and transactions. While most manufacturers targeted libraries, many redeployed similar cabinetry and filing systems for use in businesses.

Some manufactures offered a modular expandable product targeted toward the growing library collections as well as developing a long-term relationship between the company and the library.

 

The Globe Co.  offered additional services “Competent catalogers will be furnished if desired to catalogue your library with the decimal classification…”

 

A one-stop company: “The Library Bureau sells a system, not merely cards, cases and filing boxes. It not only supplies the needed material but assumes responsibility for its proper and effective working, which its twenty years experience makes it competent to do.”

 

Description:
“Globe” card catalogue for public or private libraries. [Cincinnati] : Card Index Department, The Globe Company, [1897].
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:27163300
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

Description:
The card catalogue cabinet should grow as the books on the shelves increase. [New York?] : [publisher not identified], [between 1890 and 1899?].
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:27163272
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

Description:
The Brooks card index system. Boston : Geo. H. Richter & Co., manufacturers of modern devices and furniture for public and private offices, banks and libraries, [between 1890 and 1899?].
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:27163215
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

Description:
Library Bureau, issuing body. Correspondence. New York : Prepared and printed by The Whitman Co., [1899].
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:27163341
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

Up Up and Away

The Versailles balloon experiment of Sept 10, 1783

 

Barthélemy Faujas-de-St.-Fond (1741-1819) was a lawyer, naturalist, and geologist, with an ardent interest in the prospect of ballooning and the experiments being conducted by the Montgolfier brothers. While St. Fond made significant contributions in the study of volcanic activity, he is now mostly remembered as the first to document and publish an account of the Montgolfiers’ balloons, presenting details of each experiment and subsequent improvements. St. Fond also provides particulars of each public ballooning events, including position of witnesses, precise timings and viewing angles. Initially, the Montgolfiers experimented with hydrogen gas, which exhausted too quickly for use in practical travel. However, the Montgolfiers soon discovered that air heated to 100 degrees Celsius could provide enough lift and endurance to provide long distance balloon travel. On June 5, 1783 the brothers tested a balloon made of paper and linen, which rose some 6,000 feet and traveled over 7,000 feet from the point of release. They soon followed this success by demonstrating a balloon experiment carrying a sheep, rooster, and duck to an audience at Versailles, with King Louis XVI in attendance. The animal crew came down safely with exception of the rooster, whose wing was hurt. However, St. Fond quickly rejected any notion or implications of a balloon mishap.

“…but this, was done by a kick of the sheep, half an hour before the ascent, in presence of more than ten witnesses. It is vexatious to see the public papers thus assert facts without proof, which in such cases ought always to be guaranteed by the signatures of those who send them.”

“At last the brothers Montgolfier commenced their work. They first of all began to make the smoke necessary for their experiment. The machine—which at first seemed only a covering of cloth, lined with paper, a sort of sack thirty-five feet high—became inflated, and grew large even under the eyes of the spectator, took consistence, assumed a beautiful form, stretched itself on all sides, and struggled to escape. Meanwhile, strong arms were holding it down until the signal was given, when it loosened itself, and with a rush rose to the height of 1,000 fathoms in less than ten minutes.”

“When we reflect for a moment upon the numberless difficulties which such a bold attempt entailed, upon the bitter criticism to which it would have exposed its projectors had it failed through any accident, and upon the sums that must have been spent in carrying it out, we cannot withhold the highest admiration for the men who conceived the idea and carried it out to such a successful issue.”

“The aerostatic machine was constructed of cloth lined with paper, fastened together on a network of strings fixed to the cloth. It was spherical; its circumference was 110 feet, and a wooden frame sixteen feet square held it fixed at the bottom. Its contents were about 22,000 cubic feet, and it accordingly displaced a volume of air weighing 1,980 lbs. The weight of the gas was nearly half the weight of the air, for it weighed 990 lbs., and the machine itself, with the frame, weighed 500: it was, therefore, impelled upwards with the force of 490 lbs. Two men sufficed to raise it and to fill it with gas, but it took eight to hold it down till the signal was given. The different pieces of the covering were fastened together with buttons and button-holes. It remained ten minutes in the air, but the loss of gas by the button-holes, and by other imperfections, did not permit it to continue longer. The wind at the moment of the ascent was from the north. The machine came down so lightly that no part of it was broken.”

 

The balloon experiment of Oct. 19, 1783 with two men on board

 

Experimenting with hydrogen

 

Description:
Faujas-de-St.-Fond, (Barthélemy) cit 1741-1819 author. Description des expériences de la machine aérostatique de MM. de Montgolfier. Paris ;: Chez B. Le Francq,, 1784.
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:29669463
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

Winter in New England

Invigorated by the crisp, bracing air, you skate, ski, snowshoe, toboggan, sleigh ride, tramp – whatever your fancy may dictate. 

The 1920s is considered the dawn of winter sports tourism, driven in-part, or at least complemented by the first Winter Olympics in 1924. The Boston & Maine Railroad identified a new commercial opportunity and led the charge for the development of winter tourism in New England. B&M advertising in magazines and newspapers would highlight destinations like Lake Winnipesaukee and the White Mountains, seacoast resorts, and New England’s historic places. Their campaign would try to capture, or to some extent even invent, an alluring and romantic New England winter landscape. In 1929, the first organized ski school in the United States was established in New Hampshire. It was one of the earliest resorts to promote winter vacationing and ushered in ski-mania in America.

By the 1930s and 1940s, railroads across America would offer “snow trains”, catered to the blossoming winter sport business. Some of the railroads invested in building resorts along their route, provided instructors and coaches, and offered on-board outfitting shops to further encourage vacationers. While the targeted audience was sporting types, particularly skiers, the railroads also catered to non-sporting types who might want to relax at a resort or delve into healthy spa activities.

In this early publication, the B&M declares:

Winter days mean wonderful air; air that is a better tonic than is champagne; air that means vigor and strength and an appetite, stimulated by simple pleasures, for healthy, simple food. And when the day is over there is no luxury greater than sitting before an open fire and munching popcorn and apples.

Moreover, in the enjoyment of Winter pleasures there is no limit of age or sex. The little people are perfectly sate on the specially constructed equipment provided for them. Both men and women find the outdoor activities attractive and beneficial. In short, New England in Winter has come into its own as a great health resort. The present is always a good time to consider your plans for the coming season.

 

Description:
Winter in New England : Where to Go & Where to Stay : Winter Season 1923-1924 / Issued by Passenger Traffic Department. Boston : Boston and Maine Railroad, [1923].
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:27129065
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

Owen Jones (1809-1874), an architect and designer, became one of the foremost authorities on design theory and historical ornamentation and patterns. He was a major contributor to modern color theory, and his doctrine on patterns and ornament are still considered relevant to scholars and historians today. After predictable tours of the great European cities, he turned his attention to the East for Ancient Greek and Islamic design. Spending significant time in the 1830s touring Greece, Egypt, Constantinople and Spain, he produced many drawings and water-colors, which he then reproduced through the newly developed chromolithography process. His publication demonstrated the elegance, complexity, and the purity of Islamic form, color, and design, which whet the interest among Victorian architects and designers, eventually establishing Islamic art as serious and significant. Based on his contributions, Jones was given the considerable responsibility for the layout and decoration of the Great Exhibition of 1851. While he meticulously studied the decoration of many cultures and periods, he was also a proponent for developing a uniquely 19th century style in England. He was an avid collector, acquiring and reproducing as many examples as possible for teaching tools, including illuminated books, wallpapers, textiles, ceramics, etc. He even gave a nod to the art of tattooing as a genuine artform. Jones published “The Grammar of Ornament” as a source book for examples and theories from various periods to encourage experimentation and incorporation of art forms and design.

“I have ventured to hope that, in thus bringing into immediate juxtaposition the many forms of beauty which every style of ornament presents, I might aid in arresting that unfortunate tendency of our time to be content with copying, whilst the fashion lasts, the forms peculiar to any bygone age, without attempting to ascertain, generally completely ignoring, the peculiar circumstances which rendered an ornament beautiful, because it was appropriate, and which as expressive of other wants, when thus transplanted, as entirely fails.”

“We can find no work so fitted to illustrate a Grammar of Ornament as that in which every ornament contains a grammar in itself. Every principle which we can derive from the study of the ornamental art of any other people is not only ever present here, but was by the Moors more universally and truly obeyed. We find in the Alhambra the speaking art of the Egyptians, the natural grace and refinement of the Greeks, the geometrical combinations of the Romans, the Byzantines, and the Arabs. The ornament wanted but one charm, which was the peculiar feature of the Egyptian ornament, symbolism. This the religion of the Moors forbade; but the want was more than supplied by the inscriptions, which, addressing themselves to the eye by their outward beauty, at once excited the intellect by the involutions, and delighted the imagination when and the music of their composition.”

“Man’s earliest ambition is to create. To this feeling must be ascribed the tattooing of the human face and body, resorted to by the savage to increase the expression by which he seeks to strike terror on his enemies or rivals, or to create what appears to him a new beauty. The tattooing on the head which we introduce from the Museum at Chester is very remarkable, as showing that in this very barbarous practice the principles of the very highest ornamental art are manifest, every line upon the face is the best adapted to develop the natural features.”

tattoo2

Description:
Jones, Owen. The grammar of ornament. London : Published by Day and Son, Limited, [1865].
Persistent Link:
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FHCL:29003077
Repository:
Widener Library
Institution:
Harvard University

 

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