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   Utopia and dystopia are recognized genres of fiction that probe the fabric of humanity’s social, political, and cultural framework. Utopian novels present the author’s philosophical perspective of an ideal society, while dystopian fiction examines how civilization is prone to social and moral afflictions, technological compromises, and political abuse, corruption, and oppression. Some early pioneers […]

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The Russo-Japanese War, 1904–5, grew out of a struggle for dominance and influence over Manchuria and Korea. Russia was interested in maintaining and expanding trading ports in warmer southern coastal areas and eyed both Manchuria and Korea as desirable. Japan was willing to negotiate an agreement where Russian could control Manchuria but leave Korea alone. […]

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Folklorist D.R. McAnally Jr. researched and compiled an entire volume of Irish legends and tales, Irish Wonders, in 1888. While little is known about McAnally, his publication was especially significant for the literary giant, William Butler Yeats, who consulted this work as he incorporated Irish folktales into his own writings. McAnally’s compilation became the defacto […]

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Grant Allen (1848 – 1899), is not well remembered today, but he was a prolific Canadian science and science fiction writer, novelist, naturalist, and a strong supporter of evolution theory and feminist ideals. Educated in France and England, he started as a teacher, but soon moved to writing on scientific subjects. However, he gained his greatest success […]

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The Baby Tender

  19th century homes posed many hazards for babies and toddler, such as open fires and cooking utensils. Static wood cradles and other barriers were the default safeguard for preventing tragic accidents. However, most households did not use such devices, instead relying upon older children to watch over younger siblings. In the 1860s, Dr. J. Silas […]

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Wooster Beach (1794-1859), was an ardent opponent to the allopathic/heroic medical treatments developed in the 18th century, especially such remedies as blood-letting and purging with mercurials. Beach viewed these methods as both ineffective and likely detrimental to the patient. Instead, he was an advocate for keeping an open mind to treatment options and concentrating on […]

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Carry On!

    Towards the end of the First World War, the publishing company of Harrison and Jehring published a short series of photo-pamphlets on various aspects of the British war effort. Intended as morale boosters, each pamphlet conveyed the supreme level of sacrifice and resolute commitment by British citizens. The cover art mimicked the simple […]

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When Prince Ludwig married Princess Therese on Oct. 12 1810, the city of Munich celebrated the occasion over 5 days with a combination of horse races, drinking, and feasting. The anniversary celebrations continued each year, with a growing number of participants, activities, and displays, eventually becoming known as Oktoberfest. At the 100th anniversary of Oktoberfest […]

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Lillian Moller Gilbreth (1878-1972) was a pioneer in blending psychology and engineering into the management of the workplace. In recognition of her accomplishments, Lillian Gilbreth was the first woman to be elected to the National Academy of Engineering, and until recently, the only woman to have been awarded the Hoover Medal for great, unselfish, nontechnical services […]

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Noah Brooks (1830 – 1903) is most notable as a journalist, editor, and early biographer of Abraham Lincoln. In fact, he was a close friend of Lincoln and a regular visitor to the White House. Brooks was even invited to the presidential box at Ford’s Theatre the night Lincoln was assassinated, though he was unable to attend […]

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