Quad Contemplations

I was enjoying a nice fall afternoon, which felt slightly cool and breezy, in that nirvana of climates that comes around every spring and fall or as those in Southern California call it: everyday.

While the park benches and duck pond of Boston Common were calling me, I couldn’t bare to trek on two T-lines to get there. Instead, I decided to explore a bit more of Cambridge. While I love the manicured simplicity and quaintness of Radcliffe Yard at Harvard, I wanted to venture in the opposite direction. So I found the Quad, a little slice of the Utopian balance at a university reminiscent of Dead Poets Society, just a stone’s throw from my apartment, down Shepard St, between Massachusetts Ave and Garden St (can you tell I’ve been to New York?). The Quad, which is home to Cabot House, is a small park, framed by four red brick buildings, dormitories and a cafeteria, complete with a tower clock, a roster-adorned wind vane, and all the New England charm you would expect. On one end of the lawn, students re were tossing a football,  while others were scattered, lounging in chairs and listening to music or working away on laptops.

 

The Quad Dorm

 

I took a seat and for the next hour, contemplated what being here means to me and what I want to achieve. I realized that this was indeed the balance of social and academic life that was beyond a foreign concept to me. It was more like Indiana’s discovery in the Close Encounters of the Third Kind sort of foreign.

Like many, I have brought my own baggage with me to Harvard, but my hope is to unburden myself of these lingering matters and replace them with new praxes.

It was a great hour of reflection–a word that was somewhat cringe-worthy for me–but it was the equivalent of some serious “couch time.”

I came a long way to find better meaning in education and its reform, from Houston to Cambridge, but sometimes, some of the best lessons can come from your own back yard.

Quad Feet

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