The Sunday Diigo Links Post (weekly)

April 18, 2010 at 2:31 am | In links | Comments Off on The Sunday Diigo Links Post (weekly)
  • Useful site with upcoming and archived webcasts; this is the section on Architecture, Construction, and Engineering.

    tags: research, design, brighttalk, webcasts, video, reference, architecture, urban_design, ecological_urbanism

  • I had no idea a Council on Tall Buildings existed!
    QUOTE
    The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat studies and reports on all aspects of the planning, design, construction and operation of tall buildings. Also of a major concern is the role and impact of tall buildings on the urban environment. Our membership—uniquely interdisciplinary—includes some of the world’s top authorities in their specific profession.
    UNQUOTE

    tags: buildings, reference, tall_buildings, architecture, urbanism

  • Wish I could attend this event:
    QUOTE
    Old is the New Green:
    Starbucks Center
    Presented in Partnership with the Cascadia Region Green Building Council Seattle Branch.

    This iconic building was built in 1912 by Union Pacific from Yesler Mill timber to house the Sears and Roebuck & Co. store. At 2.1 million square feet the LEED-EB certified building is the largest multi-tenant building in Washington State and helped to breathe life back into Seattle’s SODO neighborhood.

    Kevin Daniels, President of Nitze-Stagen and Daniels Development, will speak to the challenges of being a trail blazer in sustainable preservation and what made this project such a success. Don’t miss the chance to get an insider view at what makes Starbucks’ global headquarters a leader in green preservation.
    UNQUOTE

    tags: heritage, sustainability, preservation, urban_renewal, adaptability, seattle, architecture

  • It’s obvious that without efforts at TOD (transit-oriented development) there is a danger of HSR (high speed rail) making sprawl more attractive. But if we get the development angle down right, there’s no reason things couldn’t turn out as they have in Europe, where HSR does *not* equal sprawl. Why should it do so in North America? Are we that stupid – or greedy? (Don’t answer that…)
    QUOTE
    In theory (and hopefully in practice) the priorities of HSR in the U.S. are a wide mix of economic, environmental, and urban planning, goals. But some urban planners are arguing that an unintended consequence of actually building HSR lines could be a major step backwards in the notion of sustainable living.

    (…SNIP…)
    Granted, as Yonah Freemark points out, this foretelling of sprawl takeovers could be all speculation — there’s been no link established between existing HSR stations in France and Spain and an epidemic of suburban growth. Also there’s no evidence that the “commute from afar” attitude has been embraced en masse in the parts of the U.S. serviced by fast trains — how many people live in Philadelphia and take the Acela to New York City every day?
    UNQUOTE
    Bingo. Do TOD, plan better, and make living in cities attractive through amenities (including community).

    tags: high_speed_rail, transportation, transit, sprawl, transit_oriented_development

  • Note: the following three bookmarks relate to previous posts on this blog: Comment quality? (March 25, 2010) and Follow up on commenting, and Facebook (March 27, 2010):

  • One of three sites that came out of a conversation on Fred Wilson’s avc.com post, Some thoughts on comments. This site was mentioned in the comments by Liad Shabado of Doof. Permalink to Liad’s comment here.
    QUOTE
    The Casual segment of the games industry changes almost as rapidly as the Internet itself. Technology evolves, broadband usage increases and, every day, more and more people are playing and accessing and even playing their games online. Not only that, casual games are getting richer and more complex. The evolution in casual game design is finally taking its own path and leaving behind many design rules that applied to core video-games.

    In this section, we will examine what it means to design games for the evolving casual games medium and its wide-ranging, international audience.
    UNQUOTE

    tags: gaming, game_design, fred_wilson, comments, anonymity

  • One of three sites that came out of a conversation on Fred Wilson’s avc.com post, Some thoughts on comments. This site was mentioned in the comments by Liad Shabado of Doof. Permalink to Liad’s comment here.

    From this page, intro to Kim:
    QUOTE
    Amy Jo Kim is a game/social/web designer known for bridging the divide between game and web design. She has designed software UIs, games, online communities, and wrote the seminal book Community Building for the Web way back in 2000. I have long admired her work, and I am grateful that she recently sat down for an interview on the basics of game mechanics and how they can be used in interaction design.
    UNQUOTE

    tags: amy_jo_kim, comments, anonymity, gaming, game_design, bokardo

  • One of three sites that came out of a conversation on Fred Wilson’s avc.com post, Some thoughts on comments. This site was mentioned in the comments by Liad Shabado of Doof, a paper written in 1994. Liad found 5 of his 7 rules to be useful when thinking about anonymous comments. Permalink to Liad’s comment here.

    tags: comments, anonymity, fred_wilson, reference, the_commons, virtual_ecosystems

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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