About the Cyberlaw Clinic

Harvard Law School‘s Cyberlaw Clinic, based at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, provides pro bono legal services at the intersection of technology and social justice. The Cyberlaw Clinic was the first of its kind, and it continues its tradition of innovation in its areas of practice.

The Clinic’s work, teaching activities, and client selection are animated by our core values:

  • promotion of a robust and inclusive online ecosystem for free expression;
  • advancement of diversity as a key interest in technology development and tech policy;
  • elimination or mitigation of the impact of bias in the development and deployment of technology;
  • respect for and protection of privacy, vis-à-vis both private and government actors;
  • open government;
  • transparency with respect to public and private technical systems that impact all citizens (and, in particular, members of vulnerable populations);
  • access to knowledge and information;
  • advancement of cultural production through efficient and balanced regulatory and enforcement regimes; and
  • support for broad participation in public discourse.

Participation in the Cyberlaw Clinic helps law students prepare for practice by working on real-world client counseling, advocacy, litigation, and transactional projects. The Clinic strives to center clients in our legal work, helping them to achieve success as they define it, mindful of (and in response to) existing law.

From the Blog

Victory for Transparency in Probabilistic Genotyping Case 

recent decision by the Superior Court of New Jersey, Appellate Division held that the proprietary source code underlying DNA analysis software TrueAllele may be examined by an independent expert in advance of a hearing on admissibility.  The opinion aligns with the position advocated by the Clinic in its October amicus brief on behalf of Upturn, Inc., a DC-based nonprofit organization promoting technology equity. The decision is a victory for defendants’ rights and due process in a developing area of criminal law.  

Lockdown and Shutdown: New White Paper Exposes the Impacts of Recent Recent Network Disruptions in Myanmar and Bangladesh

The Cyberlaw Clinic and International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School were proud to co-author a new white paper, Lockdown and Shutdown: Exposing the Impacts of Recent Network Disruptions in Myanmar and Bangladesh, in collaboration with Athan, the Kintha Peace and Development Initiative, and Rohingya Youth Association. The report exposes the impacts of internet shutdowns in Myanmar and Bangladesh, highlighting the voices of ethnic minority internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Myanmar and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, who describe the shutdowns’ impacts in their own words. The co-authors joined to present a webinar to launch the report on January 19, 2021.