Entries Tagged as 'What’sNew'

Friday, August 2nd, 2013

What’s New: Acquisitions from the Collection of Charlotte and Arthur Vershbow

In the second half of the twentieth century Charlotte and Arthur Vershbow of Boston formed a notable private rare book collection. They were close friends of Philip Hofer, founding curator of Houghton Library’s Department of Printing and Graphic Arts, and their collecting was deeply influenced by Hofer’s collection and attitude toward collecting. After the deaths […]

Monday, July 29th, 2013

What’s New: Italian opera seria manuscripts from the library of the Ducs de Luynes

The Harvard Theatre Collection recently purchased an interesting collection of manuscript 18th century opera arias at Sotheby’s. Owned by the Ducs de Luynes, and kept in their ancestral Château de Dampierre, some of these arias may have been in the D’Albert family since before the French Revolution. An intriguing provenance indeed, which raises many questions: […]

Friday, May 10th, 2013

What’s New: Colorful Adventures

Two recent acquisitions in the Early Modern Books and Manuscripts department have plenty of colorful adventures, both literally and metaphorically. The first is a card game (call number pFB7.L5633.G800g) based on the classic picaresque novel L’Histoire de Gil Blas de Santillane by Alain Rene Le Sage, first published in 1715. Houghton already holds a set […]

Monday, May 6th, 2013

What’s New: “Boston’s Crusade Against Slavery” exhibition opens

During the Civil War era Boston led the national crusade against slavery and the struggle over emancipation and citizenship. Owing largely to activists in Boston, Massachusetts became one of the first states to end slavery. It soon granted black men full suffrage, ended the ban on interracial marriage, and in 1855 became the first state […]

Friday, April 19th, 2013

What’s New: In Search of Things Proust

This weekend, expect the smell of madeleines to fill the balmy spring air of Harvard Yard, as Proustians from around the world gather in Cambridge for the conference Proust and the Arts. Coinciding with the centennial of the publication of Swann’s Way, the first book in Proust’s masterwork In Search of Lost Time, the co-organizers […]

Friday, March 29th, 2013

What’s New: Edward Lear Online

Houghton Library holds the largest collection anywhere of original works by the English author and artist Edward Lear (1812-1888). For the past two years the library has been engaged in a project to digitize all this material. The first phase of the endeavor included Lear’s natural history drawings, which were also the subject of an […]

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

What’s New: The Machine that Needed an Artist

The Department of Printing and Graphic Arts recently acquired this hollow-cut silhouette in an oval shape of approximately 3½ x 5”. The inscription below the silhouette identifies the maker as “Williams,” referring to one of the few African-American silhouettists known of the nineteenth century, Moses Williams (1777-ca.1825). An inscription in the same hand on the […]

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

What’s New: Poetry on the line

A story in this week’s Harvard Gazette covers a new exhibition at the Woodberry Poetry Room called PHONE-A-POEM: A Selection of Archival & Newly-Commissioned Answering Machine Poems. Started in 1976 by Cambridge poet Peter Payack, for 25 years Phone-a-Poem offered callers recorded poems from the likes of Allen Ginsberg, Denise Levertov, or Donald Hall. Visitors […]

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

What’s New: Videos Highlight Houghton Contributions to Library Lab

Library Lab, a Harvard grant program for funding innovative ideas in libraries, has posted videos about a number of recent projects to YouTube. Three of those projects involve contributions from Houghton staff members: Connecting the Dots is a pilot project using the new archival cataloging standard EAC-CPF to create records for the members of Samuel […]

Friday, March 8th, 2013

What’s New: A Digital Harmony

In 1626, Nicholas Ferrar and his extended family withdrew from London to the village of Little Gidding, where they lived in secluded religious devotion. As part of their practices, the women of the family created a harmony of the Gospels, literally cutting and pasting the four texts to produce a single narrative. King Charles I, […]