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Search Results for 'bookplate'

For over five years, student assistants in the Modern Books & Manuscripts department have diligently cataloged and scanned thousands of bookplates from Houghton’s collections. Compiled primarily by collector Daniel Butler Fearing (Harvard 1882), the bookplate collection is organized roughly by subject, which include Fearing’s favorite collecting topics, fish and watercraft. The groups of bookplates that […]

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This image of a skeleton kneeling on a book is part of a set of ten bookplates. They reproduce on silk prints by several eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century wood engravers, including Thomas Bewick (1753-1828). Other subjects depicted in the set include Aesop’s fable of the fox and the stork; a medal portrait of the mathematician Charles […]

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Grown-up collectors aren’t the only readers who use bookplates; many examples in our collection were designed for children. Anna Ray Chatman (1900-1987) was born into a prominent Massachusetts family (her maternal grandfather was Oliver Ames, the governor of Massachusetts from 1887-1890, and Oakes Ames, a celebrated Harvard botanist, was her uncle). Her bookplate was designed […]

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Searching for something to feature for this week’s entry, I came across a volume titled Women Designers of Bookplates, just one of many extra-illustrated volumes of bookplates in the collection of Winward Prescott. Published in a limited edition in 1902, the book includes brief information on female bookplate designers of the period, reproduces a number […]

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Émil August Göldi (1859-1917), whose colorful bookplate is this week’s feature,was a Swiss-Brazilian zoologist who discovered numerous species of Amazonian wildlife, and researched the causes and prevention of yellow fever. Following a successful research career, Goldi was tasked by the Brazilian government with the founding of a scientific museum in Pará, which still exists today. […]

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Unfortunately, it’s not always easy to find information on the collector whose bookplate we have. This is one such example: the striking woodcut plate of Frank E. Lane. Was he a book collector? A man who enjoyed rowing to a secluded spot to read and do a little fishing? He was most likely Australian, as […]

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Most collectors might have just one bookplate for their entire collection. Rhode Island collector and merchant Daniel Butler Fearing (1859-1918) had a number of different bookplates for his many collections. This week’s plate is the one designed for Fearing’s collection of bookplates on watercraft: This particular plate was designed by Boston artist Elisha Brown Bird […]

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Continuing with our theme of bookplates featuring animals from the southern hemisphere, this week we’ve chosen the bookplate of Rhode Island industrialist Rowland Gibson Hazard (1801-1888). Hazard managed the Peace Dale Manufacturing Company in Peace Dale, RI, and served on the Rhode Island House of Representatives as well as on the Rhode Island Senate. He […]

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We’ve decided to join the current trend of weekly series in special collections blogs and start one of our own, and so we proudly introduce the “Bookplate of the Week” series! For nearly five years, student assistants in Modern Books & Manuscripts have been cataloging Houghton’s enormous and previously “hidden” collection of bookplates. Lists of […]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo Collection. One of the many pleasures of working with this collection is the amazing graphic nature of the cover art on books, newspapers, and magazines that we encounter on a daily basis.  After seeing the success of Scanning Key […]

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The following is the first in a four-part series on books from the library of Sarah Orne Jewett (1849-1909) and her family. Best known for her novels and stories set in Maine, including Deephaven (1877) and The Country of the Pointed Firs (1896), Jewett’s papers and family library came to Harvard in 1931, the bequest […]

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Ba(rnum) humbug

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Newly represented among the authors in the Santo Domingo Collection is the showman and author P.T. Barnum. Shown here is an 1866 copy of Barnum’s survey/memoir The humbugs of the world, translated into French as Les blagues de […]

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A lover of souls

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Maurice Barrès (1893-1923) was a French novelist, journalist, and political ideologue who aligned himself with the anti-Semitic French nationalist movement of his period. Besides novels and political works, Barrès also produced several books of travel writing, including this […]

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Hitler’s Kokain

This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Julio Mario Santo Domingo collection. The volumes in the Santo Domingo Collection are variously remarkable for their content, their condition, their presentation, and their provenance. Perhaps the most arresting example yet of the latter is this unassuming item: Kokain, a German […]

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This post is part of an ongoing series featuring items from the newly acquired Santo Domingo collection. Today’s volume, an 1860 edition of Baudelaire’s Les paradis artificiels: opium et haschisch, is handsomely appointed in navy morocco and marbled paper boards, with a matching suede-lined slipcase. It bears the bookplates of the French writer Maxime Du […]

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The Modern Books and Manuscripts department is pleased to announce the acquisition of the Julio Mario Santo Domingo collection, comprising over 50,000 books, manuscripts, works of art, audio recordings and films, placed on long-term deposit at Harvard by the collector’s son, Julio Mario Santo Domingo III. The Santo Domingo Collection enriches and greatly expands the […]

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The “Bookplate of the Week” series is on hiatus this week; for a bookplate related to this post, click here. Work continues apace on our project to digitize the Dickinson family library. 59 books are now available to view through the Dickinson family library finding aid (click on the “Digital Content” tab at the top […]

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Bound by Rowntree

Marianne Tidcombe, in her Women Bookbinders, 1880-1920 (1996), explores in detail how the simultaneous growth of educational opportunities for women and the birth of the Arts and Crafts Movement in England at the end of the 19th century resulted in a dramatic increase in women bookbinders.  Houghton’s shelves are already graced with the handiwork of […]

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By examining a reader’s annotations in the margins of a book, it can be possible to obtain insight into what might have influenced that reader’s own writing.   We recently acquired both a copy of J.W. Mackail’s Latin Literature owned and annotated by T.S. Eliot, as well as Allen Ginsberg’s copy of T.S. Eliot’s Collected […]

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