Special event: A talk with Nasredeen Abdulbari LL.M. ‘08, Minister of Justice, Republic of Sudan

Transitional Justice in Sudan and the Role of the International Criminal Court
A talk with Nasredeen Abdulbari LL.M. ‘08, Minister of Justice, Republic of Sudan

Nasredeen Abdulbari currently serves as Minister of Justice of the Republic of Sudan. (Read “Pursuing justice, freedom and peace,” a profile on Harvard Law Today.) Earlier, he was a lecturer in the International and Comparative Law Department, University of Khartoum, where he taught courses in public international law, conflict of laws, and an introduction to the English legal system. He also worked, on a Satter Fellowship from Harvard Law School, as Head of the Protection, Peace-building, and Psychosocial Unit of the Sudan Social Development Organization (SUDO). In East Africa, Abdulbari was a senior researcher at the Rift Valley Institute and consultant for the Open Society Initiative for Eastern Africa, based in Nairobi, Kenya.

His academic articles have been published in the Journal of African Law (University of London), the African Human Rights Law Journal (Pretoria University), the Birkbeck Law Review (University of London), and the Harvard Human Rights Law Journal, and his opinion pieces have been published in The Guardian, The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The Global Observatory. He is a co-author of The Future Constitution of Sudan: Aspirations and Views (Ahfad University for Women, Sudan, 2013). His most recent work, “The Interlinkage between Understandings of Self-Determination and Understandings of Peace,” was published as a book chapter in Making and Breaking Peace in Sudan and South Sudan: The Comprehensive Peace Agreement and Beyond (Oxford University Press, 2021).

Abdulbari holds an LL.B. and LL.M. from the University of Khartoum; an LL.M. from Harvard Law School, where he was a Stoffel Scholar and a Landon H. Gammon Fellow; and an S.J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center.

Lisa Dicker, Lecturer on Law and Clinical Instructor, Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program, will serve as moderator.

This event is open to the Harvard community. Please use your Harvard email address to register and access the Zoom link.

Friday, April 23 at 12 p.m. | Online; register here

Sponsored by International Legal Studies, the Human Rights Program, and the Program on Law and Society in the Muslim World

Special Event: Digital Rights in the Time of COVID-19

Nani Jansen Reventlow is founding Director of the Digital Freedom Fund, which supports partners in Europe to advance digital rights through strategic litigation. She is also the initiator of the Catalysts for Collaboration project, which offers best practices and case studies encouraging activists to collaborate across disciplinary silos and use strategic litigation in digital rights campaigns. Nani is a recognized international lawyer and expert in human rights litigation responsible for standard-setting freedom of expression cases across several national and international jurisdictions.  She is a Lecturer in Law at Columbia Law School and Adjunct Professor at Oxford University’s Blavatnik School of Government. She is also a Senior Fellow at Columbia Law School’s Human Rights Institute and an Affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. Nani has been an advisor to Harvard’s Cyberlaw Clinic and an Associate Tenant at Doughty Street Chambers since 2016.

Evelyn Douek, Lecturer on Law and an S.J.D. candidate at Harvard Law School, will join the conversation as moderator.

Tuesday, March 30 at 12 p.m. EDT | Online

This event is open to members of the HLS community.  Please register in advance with your Harvard email address to access the Zoom link.

Reflections from 2020 Chayes Fellows

Panelists at the November 2020 presentation

Clockwise, from top left: Sarah Deibler, Kim Everett,
Maria Smith, and Gina Starfield

In November, Chayes International Public Service Fellows Kimberly Everett ’22, Maria Smith ’22 and Gina Starfield ’22 spoke about their summer work at a panel discussion, “International Public Service against the Background of a Global Pandemic.”  Sarah Deibler, an S.J.D. candidate and 2017 Chayes Fellow, served as moderator.

View the presentation here. 

Explore the Chayes International Public Service Fellowship

“I was struck by the diversity of my work assignments, which were as varied as the stories of refugees themselves. The asylum applicants whose cases I worked on came from Iran, Pakistan and Palestine, and are fleeing distinct forms of hardship: gender-based violence, political intimidation, and terrorist recruitment. Each case allowed me a window into a new part of the world, a new problem, and a very difficult story.”

­– Noopur Sen ‘22, joint degree student,
HLS and Harvard Kennedy School

Noopur spent her 1L summer as a Chayes International Public Service Fellow, working with the Asylum Protection Centre, an NGO based in Serbia. This year, she was one of 24 Chayes Fellows who worked with organizations based in 12 countries, on issues ranging from biosurveillance and other aspects of AI, to sustainable international trade after the pandemic to protecting the rights of asylum seekers, whistleblowers, and indigenous peoples in countries around the world.

Want to learn more? Join us on Tuesday, November 17 at 12 p.m. for International Public Service against the Backdrop of a Global Pandemic, a discussion with 2020 Chayes Fellows Maria Smith ’22 (Digital Freedom Fund), Gina Starfield ’22 (Al Otro Lado), and Kimberly Everett ’22 (Clooney Foundation for Justice: TrialWatch), moderated by Sarah Deibler, S.J.D candidate (and 2017 Chayes Fellow). Please register with your Harvard email address to access the Zoom link.

Whether you have a firm idea of the career you plan to pursue, or you’re just beginning to explore new possibilities, the Chayes Fellowship can allow you to spend next summer working with a governmental or non-governmental organization concerned with issues of an international scope or relevant to countries in transition. It’s an excellent opportunity for 1Ls interested in international public service.

Chayes Fellows conduct substantive legal work- which can include research, drafting reports and memos, providing direct services to clients, and collaborating closely with supervising attorneys in their placement organizations. They also receive advice and support from the Chayes Program staff, HLS reference librarians, and others, prior to and during their summer placements.

How does it work? Visit the Chayes Fellowship web pages for more information about seeking a placement and applying for the Fellowship, as well as evaluations from past Chayes Fellows and more.