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Archive for the 'Barry Rubin' Category

From Alan Dowty So the focus shifts to deterrence. Both Charles Krauthammer (here) and Zev Chafets (here) hold out little hope for international efforts to block Iran getting the bomb, or for military action to that end (though Chafets suggests that Israel might be able “in the best case” to weaken and delay Iran’s program). […]

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From Josef Joffe The British website LiveLeak.com has removed Fitna, intoning that it had to “place the safety of its staff above all else.” You would have thought that this is a typical reaction for all those “Euroweenies,” as the satirist Peter O”Rourke once called America’s cousins from across the sea: Let’s cave in to the […]

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Iraq: still no easy answers

In November 2002, the Chronicle of Higher Education asked a number of scholars this question: “What will the world be like five years after a war with Iraq?” To mark the fifth anniversary of the Iraq war, MESH asked all of the respondents to revisit their predictions. This week, MESH is posting the responses it […]

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Lebanon 2006 was prelude

From Barry Rubin Jonathan Spyer’s article, “Lebanon 2006,” appears in the new issue of the Middle East Review of International Affairs (MERIA) Journal. This is the first analysis to include the findings of the Winograd Commission. Spyer points to the failure of the Israeli political leadership to define a clear set of goals in the […]

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From Andrew Exum Imad Mughniyah is dead, killed in Damascus by a car bomb at the age of 45. Mughniyah was believed to have been Hezbollah’s chief of military operations, and his assassination marks the first time a major figure in the movement has been killed since secretary-general Abbas Musawi in 1992—an assassination which brought […]

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Elie Kedourie (1926-1992) was a rigorous interpreter of Middle Eastern history and contemporary affairs, famous for his penetrating style and principled conservatism. In 1970 he published an essay on “The Middle East and the Powers,” as the opening piece in a collected volume named after its most renowned article, The Chatham House Version. Below, we […]

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From Walter Laqueur Detail from Eugène Delacroix, The Fanatics of Tangier, 1837-38. It is not “the West against the rest.” Throughout human history, civilizations have coexisted and competed, and there is no good reason to assume that this will change in the foreseeable future. True, there is still considerable resistance to accepting such obvious facts […]

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